6

First thing first. I hope my title is not misleading. I tried my best to phrase it.

Now, see the code below. Case 1 is pretty straight forward. Both cases work as expected. My question is why does compiler allow Case 2? Are there specific scenarios when this is desired. I cannot think of one.

interface IEmployee
{
    void Register(string role);
}

abstract class Employee : IEmployee
{
    public void Register(string role)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(role);
    }
}

// Case 1
class Manager : Employee
{
}

// Case 2
class Developer : Employee, IEmployee
{
}

class Test
{
    public void Test1()
    {
        IEmployee emp1 = new Manager();
        emp1.Register("manager"); // output "manager"

        IEmployee emp2 = new Developer();
        emp2.Register("developer"); // output "developer"
    }
}
  • When you're inheriting from Employee your already inheriting from IEmployee because Employee inherits from IEmployee, just Inherit from Employee or IEmployee instead of both. Does that answer your question or are you asking why it works? – CalebB Nov 26 '15 at 6:22
  • @CalebB I already know what you explained. Question is why Case 2 is allowed at all? Are there any use cases for such design? – Nikhil Vartak Nov 26 '15 at 6:24
  • It's allowed because IEmployee is implemented through the inheritance of Employee which implements all needed IEmployee members. There is no need to do as far as I know because you can explicitly declare IEmployee.? for implementing the member in the Developer class through inheritance of Employee. – CalebB Nov 26 '15 at 6:28
3

edit

as i expected the answer can be found in the c# specification

some taglines:

13.4.5 Interface implementation inheritance

Without explicitly re-implementing an interface, a derived class cannot in any way alter the interface mappings it inherits from its base classes

13.4.6 Interface re-implementation

A class that inherits an interface implementation is permitted to re-implement the interface by including it in the base class list

read more to study all cases (digital copy can be found in Visual Studio folders)


first thought: case 2 is allowed at least because interfaces can be implemented explicitly (sample). it turned out to be a subset of available options

public interface IEmployee
{
    void Register(string role);
}

public abstract class Employee : IEmployee
{
    public void Register(string role)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(role);
    }
}

// Case 2
public class Developer : Employee, IEmployee
{
    // this will not work without IEmployee in declaration!
    void IEmployee.Register(string role)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("i'm developer!");
    }
}
public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var dev = new Developer();
        dev.Register("senior"); 

        IEmployee e = dev;
        e.Register("senior");   
    }
}

program print:

senior
i'm developer!

first value comes from Employee.Register

second value - from Developer.Register


if Developer defined as

// Case 2
public class Developer : Employee
{
    public void Register(string role)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("i'm developer!");
    }
}

output of the same program is:

i'm developer!
senior
  • Do they need to explicitly inherit IEmployee to do that verses inheriting Employee then doing as shown above? – CalebB Nov 26 '15 at 6:29
  • yes, if they need different results of Register method when using as Employee and IEmployee – ASh Nov 26 '15 at 6:35
  • @CalebB, i have added more details about that situation and updated sample – ASh Nov 26 '15 at 6:44
  • If different output from concrete class and interface are expected, better approach IMO would be to mark Employee.Register as virtual and override it inDeveloper. Then IEmployee emp2 = new Developer(); emp2.Register("developer") would produce I'm developer and not developer. – Nikhil Vartak Nov 26 '15 at 7:45
  • 1
    @nvartak, if i design or own the base class, i can make method virtual and override in derived class and everything is all right. but if base class is not under my control, i need some other ways to change interface mapping. actually i can't remember when i last time followed such design :[ – ASh Nov 26 '15 at 7:58

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