7

I need to convert big arrays of 16-bit integer values from big-endian to little-endian format.

Now I use for conversion the following function:

inline void Reorder16bit(const uint8_t * src, uint8_t * dst)
{
    uint16_t value = *(uint16_t*)src;
    *(uint16_t*)dst = value >> 8 | value << 8;
}

void Reorder16bit(const uint8_t * src, size_t size, uint8_t * dst)
{
    assert(size%2 == 0);
    for(size_t i = 0; i < size; i += 2)
        Reorder16bit(src + i, dst + i);
}

I use GCC. Target platform is ARMv7 (Raspberry Phi 2B).

Is there any way to optimize it?

This conversion is needed for loading audio samples which can be as in little- endian as in big-endian format. Of course it is not a bottleneck now, but it takes about 10% of total processing time. And I think that is too much for such a simple operation.

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  • 6
    Is this really a bottle-neck? Have you measured? Have you profiled? – Some programmer dude Nov 26 '15 at 6:39
  • if i recall correctly, there is a dedicated assembly instruction for doing this! but i don't recall the name – hanshenrik Nov 26 '15 at 6:44
  • 2
    @hanshenrik: bswap on x86-64. Or __builtin_bswap in GCC. – Jon Purdy Nov 26 '15 at 6:54
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    Why are you using those stupid casts? In one you are for example discarding the const qualifier, which is exactly the reason not to use C-style casts. You have a byte array already, why are you extracting a bigger type from some possibly unaligned address, only to shift the bytes inside that bigger type around and to store them again? Just think about which byte in the input array belongs into which byte of the output array! – Ulrich Eckhardt Nov 26 '15 at 7:28
  • 7
    Your Reorder16bit code violates the strict aliasing rule. You'll have to use -fno-strict-aliasing, plus an alignment check, to guarantee correct operation, which may slow down the rest of your code. A better option is to write simple, correct code and tell your compiler to optimize it. That's what compilers are for. – M.M Nov 26 '15 at 7:56
8

If you want to improve performance of your code you can make following:

1) Processing of 4-bytes for one step:

inline void Reorder16bit(const uint8_t * src, uint8_t * dst)
{
    uint16_t value = *(uint16_t*)src;
    *(uint16_t*)dst = value >> 8 | value << 8;
}

inline void Reorder16bit2(const uint8_t * src, uint8_t * dst)
{
    uint32_t value = *(uint32_t*)src;
    *(size_t*)dst = (value & 0xFF00FF00) >> 8 | (value & 0x00FF00FF) << 8;
}

void Reorder16bit(const uint8_t * src, size_t size, uint8_t * dst)
{
    assert(size%2 == 0);

    size_t alignedSize = size/4*4;
    for(size_t i = 0; i < alignedSize; i += 4)
        Reorder16bit2(src + i, dst + i);
    for(size_t i = alignedSize; i < size; i += 2)
        Reorder16bit(src + i, dst + i);
}

If you use a 64-bit platform, it is possible to process 8 bytes for one step the same way.

2) ARMv7 platform supports SIMD instructions called NEON. With using of them you can make you code even faster then in 1):

inline void Reorder16bit(const uint8_t * src, uint8_t * dst)
{
    uint16_t value = *(uint16_t*)src;
    *(uint16_t*)dst = value >> 8 | value << 8;
}

inline void Reorder16bit8(const uint8_t * src, uint8_t * dst)
{
    uint8x16_t _src = vld1q_u8(src);
    vst1q_u8(dst, vrev16q_u8(_src));
}

void Reorder16bit(const uint8_t * src, size_t size, uint8_t * dst)
{
    assert(size%2 == 0);

    size_t alignedSize = size/16*16;
    for(size_t i = 0; i < alignedSize; i += 16)
        Reorder16bit8(src + i, dst + i);
    for(size_t i = alignedSize; i < size; i += 2)
        Reorder16bit(src + i, dst + i);
}
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  • It is intresting. I will check it. – user5480682 Nov 26 '15 at 7:46
8

https://goo.gl/4bRGNh

int swap(int b) {
  return __builtin_bswap16(b);
}

becomes

swap(int):
        rev16   r0, r0
        uxth    r0, r0
        bx      lr

So yours could be written as (gcc-explorer: https://goo.gl/HFLdMb)

void fast_Reorder16bit(const uint16_t * src, size_t size, uint16_t * dst)
{
    assert(size%2 == 0);
    for(size_t i = 0; i < size; i++)
        dst[i] = __builtin_bswap16(src[i]);
} 

which should make for loop

.L13:
        ldrh    r4, [r0, r3]
        rev16   r4, r4
        strh    r4, [r2, r3]    @ movhi
        adds    r3, r3, #2
        cmp     r3, r1
        bne     .L13

read more about __builtin_bswap16 at GCC builtin docs.

Neon suggestion (kinda tested, gcc-explorer: https://goo.gl/fLNYuc):

void neon_Reorder16bit(const uint8_t * src, size_t size, uint8_t * dst)
{
  assert(size%16 == 0);
  //uint16x8_t vld1q_u16 (const uint16_t *) 
  //vrev64q_u16(uint16x8_t vec);
  //void vst1q_u16 (uint16_t *, uint16x8_t) 
  for (size_t i = 0; i < size; i += 16)
    vst1q_u8(dst + i, vrev16q_u8(vld1q_u8(src + i)));
}

which becomes

.L23:
        adds    r5, r0, r3
        adds    r4, r2, r3
        adds    r3, r3, #16
        vld1.8  {d16-d17}, [r5]
        cmp     r1, r3
        vrev16.8        q8, q8
        vst1.8  {d16-d17}, [r4]
        bhi     .L23

See more about neon intrinsics here: https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.4.1/gcc/ARM-NEON-Intrinsics.html

Bonus from ARM ARM A8.8.386:

VREV16 (Vector Reverse in halfwords) reverses the order of 8-bit elements in each halfword of the vector, and places the result in the corresponding destination vector.

VREV32 (Vector Reverse in words) reverses the order of 8-bit or 16-bit elements in each word of the vector, and places the result in the corresponding destination vector.

VREV64 (Vector Reverse in doublewords) reverses the order of 8-bit, 16-bit, or 32-bit elements in each doubleword of the vector, and places the result in the corresponding destination vector.

There is no distinction between data types, other than size.

vrev diagram

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  • 1
    Your code with using of vrev64q_u16() gives wrong result. May be you mean vrev16q_u8() instead of this one? – ErmIg Nov 26 '15 at 11:58
  • 1
    As well as the suggestions here, the load/store is a large portion of this. If you are re-rating, filtering, etc. the NEON can process the data while doing the swap and NEON/SIMD is meant for application like audio processing. Typical audio algorithms only involve near by sample values. So the procedure based mode won't be optimal, but some inline functions with NEON datatypes with a larger load/store for loop might be better. – artless noise Nov 26 '15 at 17:17
6

If it's specifically for ARM there's a REV instruction, specifically REV16 which would do two 16 bit ints at a time.

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  • 5
    @David The compiler uses this to implement the __builtin_bswap16. – Jens Nov 26 '15 at 8:22
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    It's worth noting that even an old GCC 4.8 (at -O2) recognises the idiom and compiles the code in the question to a load/store loop around a single rev16 instruction. – Notlikethat Nov 26 '15 at 9:19
6

I don't know much about ARM instruction sets, but I guess there are some special instruction to endianess conversion. Apparently, ARMv7 has things like rev etc.

Have you tried the compiler intrinsic __builtin_bswap16? It should compile to CPU-specific code, e.g. rev on ARM. In addition, it helps the compiler to recognize that you are actually doing a byte-swap, and it performs other optimizations with that knowledge, e.g. eliminate redundant byte swaps entirely in cases like y=swap(x); y &= some_value; x = swap(y);.

I googled a little bit, and this thread discusses an issue with the optimization potential. According to this discussion, the compiler can also vectorize the conversion if the CPU supports the vrev NEON instruction.

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  • How is the swap in your example redundant in any way? – JimmyB Nov 26 '15 at 10:38
  • @HannoBinder I assumed some_value to be a constant, so instead of swapping x, adding the constant and swapping back, the compiler can compute a swapped constant and combine that with x. Another case would be to use bit operations e.g. to mask some bits from the swap(x). – Jens Nov 26 '15 at 12:36
  • Ok, I didn't realize that some_value was meant to denote a compile-time constant. In that case you may of course be correct. – JimmyB Nov 26 '15 at 14:12
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    @Jens Swapped constant? How is that supposed to work with carry? If a carry condition happens in either of the bytes, the result will be incorrect. – nitro2k01 Nov 26 '15 at 19:08
  • @nitro2k01 Yeah, you're right. But it will work with bit operations, e.g. binary and. That's the example in the first link, and gcc implements it. – Jens Nov 26 '15 at 20:24
2

You'd want to measure to see which is faster, but an alternative body for Reorder16bit would be

*(uint16_t*)dst = 256 * src[0] + src[1];

assuming that your native ints are little-endian. Another possibility:

dst[0] = src[1];
dst[1] = src[0];
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    Initially, I used your second variant. It requires 2 loading and 2 storing in memory. My variant requires 1 loading and 1 in memory and 3 bit manipulations between registers. And it is surprising but second variant is faster due to slow memory access. – user5480682 Nov 26 '15 at 7:45
  • The second variant is slow because of aliasing. If you add temporary variables, and do both reads before any write, the compiler should be able to optimize better. – Ben Voigt Nov 26 '15 at 20:50

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