29

How do I control only firing an event once?

Actually, a quick Google appears to allude to the fact that .one helps..

0
61

Use once if you don't need to support Internet Explorer:

element.addEventListener(event, func, { once: true });

Otherwise use this:

function addEventListenerOnce(target, type, listener, addOptions, removeOptions) {
    target.addEventListener(type, function fn(event) {
        target.removeEventListener(type, fn, removeOptions);
        listener.apply(this, arguments);
    }, addOptions);
}

addEventListenerOnce(document.getElementById("myelement"), "click", function (event) {
    alert("You'll only see this once!");
});
2
  • 1
    Beautiful method, i never thought about using named functions like that. See my answer for a slightly improved version preserving this and passing all arguments.
    – Shikyo
    Apr 12 '18 at 12:46
  • @Shikyo I've added this
    – rofrol
    Apr 18 '18 at 8:31
27

You can use jQuery's one method, which will subscribe to only the first occurrence of an event.
For example:

$('something').one('click', function(e) {
    alert('You will only see this once.');
});
5
  • OK, awesome, just wondering, what is the 'e' between your parentheses? Also, does this function require two parameters? 1 for what you want to only run once, and the other for the function?
    – Qcom
    Aug 3 '10 at 5:04
  • 1
    e is the event formal parameter for the callback. In this case it is unused. The two parameters are the event type and function. Aug 3 '10 at 5:05
  • Awesome! That is really helpful, what is the difference between this and .bind? Is it that it doesn't need to be unbound by something like .unbind?
    – Qcom
    Aug 3 '10 at 5:07
  • 1
    The one method can take three parameters; see the documentation. api.jquery.com/one
    – SLaks
    Aug 3 '10 at 5:07
  • As stated in the documentation, calling the one method is equivalent to calling bind, then calling unbind in the handler.
    – SLaks
    Aug 3 '10 at 5:07
5

Same as rofrol's answer, just another form:

    function addEventListenerOnce(element, event, fn) {
        var func = function () {
            element.removeEventListener(event, func);
            fn();
        };
        element.addEventListener(event, func);
    }
5

Slightly improved version of rofrol's anwser:

function addEventListenerOnce(target, type, listener) {
    target.addEventListener(type, function fn() {
        target.removeEventListener(type, fn);
        listener.apply(this, arguments);
    });
}

By using apply all arguments are passed and the this works as expected.

2
  • you should not use that hacks anymore, there is a simple way to do that element.addEventListener(event, func, { once: true }), as @kapitalny pointed out Jun 5 '18 at 1:45
  • 3
    It is indeed much nicer but IE is a ... caniuse.com/#search=once
    – Shikyo
    Jun 6 '18 at 13:21
3

Just use proper option in your addEventListener method call:

element.addEventListener(event, func, { once: true })
1
1

Additionally, you can do this:

window.addEventListener("click", function handleClick(e) {
    window.removeEventListener("click", handleClick);

    // ...
});
0

Added the options for add/remove event listener:

function addEventListenerOnce(target, type, listener, optionsOrUseCaptureForAdd, optionsOrUseCaptureForRemove) {
    const f = event => {
        target.removeEventListener(type, f, optionsOrUseCaptureForRemove);
        listener(event);
    }
    target.addEventListener(type, f, optionsOrUseCaptureForAdd);
}

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