61

By the full type of a variable I mean the sort of information that you get in the immediate window:

enter image description here

I would like to determine the type information dynamically using VBA. The function TypeName() doesn't do what I want since it returns the subtype of a variant and doesn't distinguish between e.g. a variant variable holding a range, an object variable holding a range, and a range variable holding a range.

As a preliminary step, I wrote a function which detects if a variant is passed to it. It works by exploiting pass-by-reference semantics. The code does things with its argument that can only be done with a variant and will thus trigger an error if the passed variable isn't actually a variant:

Function IsVariant(var As Variant) As Boolean
    Dim temp As Variant
    Dim isVar As Boolean

    If IsObject(var) Then
        Set temp = var
    Else
        temp = var
    End If

    On Error Resume Next
        Set var = New Collection
        var = "test"
        If Err.Number > 0 Then
            isVar = False
        Else
            isVar = True
        End If
    On Error GoTo 0

    If IsObject(temp) Then
        Set var = temp
    Else
        var = temp
    End If
    IsVariant = isVar
End Function

Based on this, I wrote:

Function FullType(var As Variant) As String
    If IsVariant(var) Then
        FullType = "Variant/" & TypeName(var)
    Else
        FullType = TypeName(var)
    End If
End Function

Testing code:

Sub TestTypes()
    Dim R As Range
    Dim Ob As Object
    Dim i As Integer
    Dim v1 As Variant
    Dim v2 As Variant

    v1 = 10
    i = 10

    Set v2 = Range("A1")
    Set Ob = Range("A2")
    Set R = Range("A3")

    Debug.Print "v1: " & FullType(v1)
    Debug.Print "i: " & FullType(i)
    Debug.Print "v2: " & FullType(v2)
    Debug.Print "Ob: " & FullType(Ob)
    Debug.Print "R: " & FullType(R)  
End Sub

Output:

v1: Variant/Integer
i: Integer
v2: Variant/Range
Ob: Range
R: Range

This is almost what I want -- but doesn't distinguish between an object variable holding a range and a range variable holding a range. I've tried to write a function called IsTypeObject which works similarly to IsVariant but can't seem to get it to work:

Function IsTypeObject(var As Variant) As Boolean
    Dim temp As Variant
    Dim isGeneric As Boolean

    If (Not IsObject(var)) Or IsVariant(var) Then
        IsTypeObject = False
        Exit Function
    End If

    Set temp = var
    On Error Resume Next
        Set var = New Collection
        Set var = ActiveWorkbook
        If Err.Number > 0 Then
            isGeneric = False
        Else
            isGeneric = True
        End If
    On Error GoTo 0

    Set var = temp
    IsTypeObject = isGeneric
End Function

Test:

Sub test()
    Dim R As Range
    Set R = Range("A1")
    Debug.Print IsTypeObject(R)
End Sub

But this prints True even though I would think that the same pass-by-reference semantics which makes IsVariant work should also make IsTypeObject work (you can't assign a collection to a range). I've tried various tweaks but can't seem to distinguish between the generic object variables and specific object variables such as range variables.

So -- any ideas for how to dynamically get the full type of a variable? (The motivation is as part of a debug-log utility)

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  • The variant's pass-by-reference works because the VARIANT struct has the VT_BYREF flag that may or may not be set. There's nothing like that for non-Variant variables. You have reflection in .NET, but not in VBA. – GSerg Nov 26 '15 at 15:32
  • @GSerg The weird thing is, even in the case of my "successful" IsVariant, when I pass it a Range variable and look where the actual error arises by stepping through it in the debugger, the line Set var = New Collection doesn't actually trigger the error -- the next line when I try to assign a string to it is what causes the error that I'm trapping. I'm thinking that VBA must implement pass by reference via some sort of copy-restore method -- but then it becomes odd that the next line causes an error (as opposed to a type mismatch on return). – John Coleman Nov 26 '15 at 15:42
  • 3
    This is because when an object is used in a value context, VB tries to use the default property of the object instead. Provided that var is an object, var = "test" tries to assign "test" to the default property of var, and it does not have one (error 438, which is not a type mismatch error). – GSerg Nov 26 '15 at 16:00
  • I think you can rewrite your IsVariant function to be much more friendly, by manually analyzing the vt member of the Variant. It will most likely have VT_BYREF flag and the flag for what it actually points to. But in order to tell whether a variable was declared in code As Range or As Object, you need to be the compiler. – GSerg Nov 26 '15 at 16:16
  • 1
    @GSerg That explains a lot of it. The locals window probably gets its information by a combination of parsing Dim statements and dynamically via the type function. I suspected that some form of parsing is inevitable if I really want to get the full type, but was hoping that I was overlooking something (relatively) simple. – John Coleman Nov 26 '15 at 16:18
19

Yes, you can do this: it requires a little knowledge of pointers and the concept of 'dereferencing'...

Here's the code to do it:

Public Function VariantTypeName(ByRef MyVariant) As String
' Returns the expanded type name of a variable, indicating
' whether it's a simple data type (eg: Long Integer), or a
' Variant containing data of that type, eg: "Variant/Long"
Dim iType As Integer Const VT_BYREF = &H4000&
CopyMemory iType, MyVariant, 2
' iType now contains the VarType of the incoming parameter ' combined with a bitwise VT_BYREF flag indicating that it ' was passed by reference. In other words, it's a pointer, ' not the data structure of the variable (or a copy of it)
' So we should have VT_BYREF - and we'd always expect to ' when MyVariant is a Variant, as variants are a structure ' which uses a pointer (or pointers) to the stored data...
' However, the VBA implementation of a variant will always ' dereference the pointer - all the pointers - passing us ' straight to the data, stripping out all that information ' about references...
If (iType And VT_BYREF) = VT_BYREF Then ' Bitwise arithmetic detects the VT_BYREF flag: VariantTypeName = TypeName(MyVariant) Else ' No VT_BYREF flag. This is a Variant, not a variable: VariantTypeName = "Variant/" & TypeName(MyVariant) End If
End Function

(Declarations for the CopyMemory API function are a few paragraphs further down).

That needs some explanation, because the Visual Basic family of languages are designed to shield you from the implementation details of variables and their types - and from the concept of pointers in particular - and my code does involve a bit of lateral thinking.

In simple terms, your variables have a name - a string like 'intX' you see in your code; an area of memory allocated to contain the actual data; and an address for that memory.

That address will actually be for the start of the memory allocated to the variable, and the variable will be implemented as a structure in memory defined by offsets to the actual data, with the size (or length) of data - and, for complex types, by offsets to addresses to other structures in memory. Those sizes and offsets are predefined: they are the actual implementation of the variable, and we VBA developers rarely need to know about that - we declare the type, and its all done for us.

The first thing that you need to know today is that the first two bytes at address of a variable in VBA are the enumerated var type: that's how the VarType() Function works.

When the program passes that address, instead of passing a copied allocation of the data in memory, it passes that address as a pointer. Yes, I'm oversimplifying some of this, but VBA developers do actually know the difference between getting a pointer and a copy of the data: it's in the ByRef and ByVal identifiers we use for incoming parameters when we declare a function.

VBA and VB are very, very good at shielding us from the details: so good, that we can't use VarType and TypeName to detect that we've been passed a value, or a reference to it; or even a reference to a reference, to a reference.

This matters, because a variant is a wrapper for other variables, and the structure gives you a pointer to the variable that it contains with the var type to describe it: however, we have no way of knowing that in VBA - we are passed straight down the line indicated by the address, all the way to the data we are going to use, and the VBA varType never tells us that we went there indirectly by several hops through successive addresses defined by pointers.

However, that information does exist, if you're prepared to look at those two bytes behind the pointer using an API call.

As I said, those two bytes contain the var type - but there's more: they contain the var type combined with a bitwise marker VT_BYREF indicating that this is a reference, or pointer, to the stored data type, and not the data itself. So this code will reliably tell you your var type, with a little lateral thinking to get over VBA being helpful when we'd rather it wasn't:

Public Function DereferencedType(ByRef MyVar) As Long
Dim iType As Integer
Const VT_BYREF = &H4000&
' The first two bytes of a variable are the type ID with a ' bitwise OR to VT_BYREF if we were passed the variable by ' reference... Which is exactly what this function does:
CopyMemory iType, MyVar, 2
DereferencedType = iType ' Mod VT_BYREF
'Use "Mod VT_BYREF" to separate out the type if you want
End Function
At a first glance, this function appears to be self-defeating: I'm passing the variable - variant or simple type - by reference, so it's always going to be combined with VT_BYREF. And I've commented-out the 'modulo' arithmetic anyway...

...And that's how it actually works: pass it a simple variable, and it'll tell you that you passed the variable by reference:

Dim str1 As String
str1 = "One Hundred"
Debug.Print "String Variable: " & DereferencedType(str1)
...And you get the output vbString OR VT_BYREF:

String Variable: 16392

But if you pass our function a string variant, VBA's implementation of the Variant will shield you from all that complexity about pointers and passing by reference - all the way down to the data - and give you your data with all that unwanted information stripped out:

Dim varX As Variant
varX = "One Hundred"
Debug.Print "String Variant:  " & DereferencedType(varX)
...And you get the output:

String Variant:  8

I'll leave you to code up an OR or NOT operation on the returned values with VT_BYREF, to give you the 'Variant/' label for your expanded string descriptors of the Variant/String and Variant/Long outputs.

[Edit: did that, it's at the top of the answer, implemented as VariantTypeName]

I recommend that you declare the CopyMemory API call as shown, with conditional compiler constants for all the environments you're likely to encounter:


#If VBA7 And Win64 Then    ' 64 bit Excel under 64-bit Windows
                           ' Use LongLong and LongPtr
Private Declare PtrSafe Sub CopyMemory Lib "kernel32" Alias "RtlMoveMemory" _ (Destination As Any, _ Source As Any, _ ByVal Length As LongLong)
#ElseIf VBA7 Then ' 64 bit Excel in all environments ' Use LongPtr only, LongLong is not available
Private Declare PtrSafe Sub CopyMemory Lib "kernel32" Alias "RtlMoveMemory" _ (Destination As Any, _ Source As Any, _ ByVal Length As Long)
#Else ' 32 bit Excel
Private Declare Sub CopyMemory Lib "kernel32" Alias "RtlMoveMemory" _ (Destination As Any, _ Source As Any, _ ByVal Length As Long) #End If

Meanwhile, the harder question - getting Variant/Object/Range - will need further work. I can tell you that your variant contains a range, and I can tell that it's a variant and not itself a range: but I can't go down the chain of declarations to reveal that an object was declared as 'object' now that it points to a range:

VarX is set equal to a range object variable:
    varX: type=8204     Range   Dereferenced Type=9
    rng1: type=8204     Range   Dereferenced Type=16393
VarX is set equal to a range object's value, a 2-dimensional array: varX: type=8204 Variant() Dereferenced Type=8204 arr1: type=8204 Variant() Dereferenced Type=8204
The array variable is erased to Empty(). Inspect varX: varX: type=8204 Variant() Dereferenced Type=8204 arr1: type=8204 Variant() Dereferenced Type=8204
VarX is set equal to an 'object' variable, which has been set to a range: varX: type=8204 Range Dereferenced Type=9 obj1: type=8204 Range Dereferenced Type=16393

Here's the code that generated that, and the full output:


Public Sub TestVar()
Dim varX As Variant Dim str1 As String Dim lng1 As Long Dim rng1 As Excel.Range Dim arr1 As Variant Dim obj1 As Object
Debug.Print "Uninitialised:" Debug.Print Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "str1: type=" & VarType(str1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(str1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(str1) Debug.Print vbTab & "lng1: type=" & VarType(lng1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(lng1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(lng1) Debug.Print
varX = "One Hundred" str1 = "One Hundred" lng1 = 100 Debug.Print "varX and str1 are populated with the same literal:" Debug.Print Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "str1: type=" & VarType(str1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(str1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(str1) Debug.Print vbTab & "lng1: type=" & VarType(lng1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(lng1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(lng1) Debug.Print
varX = 100 lng1 = 100 Debug.Print "varX and lng1 are populated with the same integer:" Debug.Print Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "str1: type=" & VarType(str1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(str1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(str1) Debug.Print vbTab & "lng1: type=" & VarType(lng1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(lng1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(lng1) Debug.Print
varX = str1 Debug.Print "VarX is set equal to str1:" Debug.Print Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "str1: type=" & VarType(str1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(str1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(str1) Debug.Print
varX = lng1 Debug.Print "VarX is set equal to lng1:" Debug.Print Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "lng1: type=" & VarType(lng1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(lng1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(lng1) Debug.Print
Set varX = ActiveSheet.Range("A1:C3") Debug.Print "VarX is set equal to a range:" Debug.Print Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print
Set rng1 = ActiveSheet.Range("A1:C3") Set varX = Nothing Set varX = rng1 Debug.Print "VarX is set equal to a range object variable:" Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "rng1: type=" & VarType(rng1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(rng1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(rng1) Debug.Print
arr1 = rng1.Value2 Set varX = Nothing varX = arr1 Debug.Print "VarX is set equal to a range object's value, a 2-dimensional array:" Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "arr1: type=" & VarType(rng1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(arr1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(arr1) Debug.Print
Erase arr1 Debug.Print "The array variable is erased to Empty(). Inspect varX:" Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "arr1: type=" & VarType(rng1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(arr1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(arr1) Debug.Print
Set obj1 = ActiveSheet.Range("A1:C3") Set varX = Nothing Set varX = obj1 Debug.Print "VarX is set equal to an 'object' variable, which has been set to a range:" Debug.Print vbTab & "varX: type=" & VarType(varX) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(varX) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(varX) Debug.Print vbTab & "obj1: type=" & VarType(rng1) & vbTab & vbTab & TypeName(obj1) & vbTab & "Dereferenced Type=" & DereferencedType(obj1) Debug.Print
End Sub

Results:

Uninitialised:
    varX: type=0        Empty   Dereferenced Type=0
    str1: type=8        String  Dereferenced Type=16392
    lng1: type=3        Long    Dereferenced Type=16387
varX and str1 are populated with the same literal: varX: type=8 String Dereferenced Type=8 str1: type=8 String Dereferenced Type=16392 lng1: type=3 Long Dereferenced Type=16387
varX and lng1 are populated with the same integer: varX: type=2 Integer Dereferenced Type=2 str1: type=8 String Dereferenced Type=16392 lng1: type=3 Long Dereferenced Type=16387
VarX is set equal to str1: varX: type=8 String Dereferenced Type=8 str1: type=8 String Dereferenced Type=16392
VarX is set equal to lng1: varX: type=3 Long Dereferenced Type=3 lng1: type=3 Long Dereferenced Type=16387
VarX is set equal to a range: varX: type=8204 Range Dereferenced Type=9
VarX is set equal to a range object variable: varX: type=8204 Range Dereferenced Type=9 rng1: type=8204 Range Dereferenced Type=16393
VarX is set equal to a range object's value, a 2-dimensional array: varX: type=8204 Variant() Dereferenced Type=8204 arr1: type=8204 Variant() Dereferenced Type=8204
The array variable is erased to Empty(). Inspect varX: varX: type=8204 Variant() Dereferenced Type=8204 arr1: type=8204 Variant() Dereferenced Type=8204
VarX is set equal to an 'object' variable, which has been set to a range: varX: type=8204 Range Dereferenced Type=9 obj1: type=8204 Range Dereferenced Type=16393

All in all, an interesting question: the short version of my answer is that you can disambiguate variants and simple types, but an an object declared as 'object' isn't amenable to that analysis.

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  • 1
    Impressive. I have to think about it a bit to fully understand it. It seems that your answer is a good explanation of why the question is harder than I had thought it would be. I think that some sort of parsing (in addition to dereferencing) must be done in order to reproduce the sort of information that the debugging tools give. – John Coleman Feb 18 '16 at 22:44
  • 1
    There is a typo in the first code block. VariantType should be DereferencedType . – BrakNicku Feb 19 '16 at 8:08
  • While that looks like a lot of useful code, with all due respect, I think it's not that useful after all, and is basically an example of what I suggested earlier. – GSerg Feb 19 '16 at 10:41
  • 1
    Edited: the answer now has a fully-implemented VariantTypeName() function to give you the type name as 'Variant/Long' or 'Long' – Nigel Heffernan Feb 19 '16 at 12:00
10
+50

You have the code that determines if the variable is a Variant already. Now all you need to do is get the subtype, right? There's a built in function for exactly that: VarType.

It has limitations though. It only works for native types. It always returns vbUserDefinedType (36) for user defined types. Although, I suppose you could special case that with a call to TypeName in order to finish the job off.

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  • 2
    Thanks, but I don't really think that the VarType does what I wanted since in the posted code I used TypeName for much the same purposes. The point of the question is that it wasn't able to distinguish between e.g. an object variable holding a range and a range variable holding a range. I was mostly trying to reproduce the type information that the locals window displays. That information must be somewhere but only part of that information can be gleaned from functions like VarType or TypeName – John Coleman Feb 18 '16 at 22:39

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