15

Consider this code:

double i = 0xF0000000;
Console.WriteLine(0xF0000000.GetType());
Console.WriteLine(i.GetType());

Why C# prints System.UInt32 for first one and System.Double for the second one?

Is that because, the compiler by default infers a literal to be of type var?

57

In this line:

double i = 0xF0000000;

the literal is of type uint, but it's being implicitly converted to a double. When you call i.GetType() that would always print System.Double, because the variable is of type double... the only kind of value it can hold is a double.

Note that this conversion to double means you can lose precision, if you start off with a long or ulong. For example:

using System;

public class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        long x = 123456789012345678;
        double y = 123456789012345678;
        Console.WriteLine(x.ToString("n"));
        Console.WriteLine(y.ToString("n"));
    }
}

prints

123,456,789,012,345,678.00
123,456,789,012,346,000.00

Note how the final few digits are lost in the double, because the implicit conversion from long to double can lose precision. (Both have 64 bits available, but in double only some of those bits are used for the mantissa.)

It's not a problem for int or uint literals, but it's worth being aware that the conversion is happening.

12

According to Integer Literals (C#) the type of an integer literal depends on the value, and its suffix.

  • If the literal has no suffix, it has the first of these types in which its value can be represented: int, uint, long, ulong.
  • If the literal is suffixed by U or u, it has the first of these types in which its value can be represented: uint, ulong.
  • If the literal is suffixed by L or l, it has the first of these types in which its value can be represented: long, ulong.
  • If the literal is suffixed by UL, Ul, uL, ul, LU, Lu, lU, or lu, it is of type ulong.

0xF0000000 has no suffix, so it has the first type that can represent it (int, uint, long, ulong)

  • int is 32-bit signed: 0xF0000000 is just outside it's range for positive values - next...
  • uint is 32-bit unsigned: 0xF0000000 is within it's range - OK.

So 0xF0000000 has type uint.

decimal x = 0xF00000000;

Here x is a decimal variable. When you assign a uint value to it, that value is implicitly converted into a decimal (so it will fit into the decimal variable).

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