5

Newbie question:

How to split a vector of numbers at and including the first instance of the maximum value in it?

So, from this [1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1], get [1 2 3 4 5] [4 3 2 1].

The way I'm doing it seems overly complex:

(def up5 [1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1])
(split-at (inc (.indexOf up5 (apply max up5))) up5) ; => [1 2 3 4 5] [4 3 2 1]

Does that seem a little awkward? For example using the defined vector three times. And do we need to use Java to get the index?

What would be a better, more idiomatic, or more performant way?

Thanks.

  • 4
    More performant would be with reduce-kv to avoid the .indexOf call. But it's even longer than your version. – ClojureMostly Nov 27 '15 at 7:54
  • Is the input always a vector? Do you require the result to be seq/vector/whatever? – Davyzhu Nov 27 '15 at 9:42
  • I don't think it would matter. Anyway I'm not using this code for any purpose beyond trying to improve... – Mallory-Erik Nov 27 '15 at 9:59
  • 2
    @Mallory-Erik I was too concerned about the performant part, apparently you are not looking for dead performance. :D tnoda's solution is idiomatic enough already. – Davyzhu Nov 27 '15 at 11:21
  • 1
    @Andre Is reduce-kv faster than .indexOf? – Thumbnail Nov 29 '15 at 14:34
1
(defn split-at-max [v]
  (when (seq v)
    (let [m (apply max v)
          point (inc (count (reduce (fn [a b] (if (> m b) (conj a b) 
                                              (reduced a))) [] v)))]
      ((juxt #(take point %) #(drop point %)) v))))

(split-at-max [1 2 9 2 -7  33 3 4 53 1 22 4 -44 444 3 2 3 0 -21])
;;=> [(1 2 9 2 -7 33 3 4 53 1 22 4 -44 444) (3 2 3 0 -21)]
(split-at-max [])
;;=> nil
(split-at-max [26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33])
;;=> [(26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33) ()]
(split-at-max [33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26])
;;=> [(33) (32 31 30 29 28 27 26)]
;; works also with sets and lists:
(split-at-max '(1 2 9 2 -7  33 3 4 53 1 22 4 -44 444 3 2 3 0 -21))
;;=> [(1 2 9 2 -7 33 3 4 53 1 22 4 -44 444) (3 2 3 0 -21)]
(split-at-max '())
;;=> nil
(split-at-max (hash-set))
;;=> nil
(split-at-max (sorted-set))
;;=> nil
(split-at-max (sorted-set 1 2 9 2 -7 33 3 4 53 1 22 4 -44 444 3 2 3 0 -21))
;;=> [(-44 -21 -7 0 1 2 3 4 9 22 33 53 444) ()]
(split-at-max (hash-set 1 2 9 2 -7 33 3 4 53 1 22 4 -44 444 3 2 3 0 -21))
;;=> [(0 1 4 -21 33 22 -44 3 2 444) (-7 9 53)]

another similar way using split-with to split at the max-point (also need to do a seq on the input first, if there is a chance to have empty collections):

(let [v [1 2 9 2 -7 33 3 4 53 1 22 4 -44 444 3 2 3 0 -21]
      m (apply max v)]
  ((juxt #(concat (first %) [(first (second %))]) #(rest (second %)))
   (split-with (partial > m) v)))
;;=> [(1 2 9 2 -7 33 3 4 53 1 22 4 -44 444) (3 2 3 0 -21)]
  • You first version fails if the max element is the first or last one. Also fails for the empty vector – ClojureMostly Nov 28 '15 at 8:54
  • Thank you very much for pointing that out, i have changed it using reduce to find the max-point instead of partition-by – amirt Nov 28 '15 at 11:22
2

alternative variant (just for fun):

  • you generate the sequence of tuples with split-position (item's index + 1) and item itself
  • find the tuple with max item using max-key
  • split your collection at the needed index (first item in a tuple)

    (defn split-at-max [items]
       (->> items
            (map vector (rest (range)))
            (apply max-key second)
            first
            (#(split-at % items))))
    
    user> (split-at-max [-1 20 3 4 1 3 5 101 4 2 6 4])
    [(-1 20 3 4 1 3 5 101) (4 2 6 4)]
    

moreover you could easily modify it to be used with an arbitrary criteria for estimation the value.

(defn split-at-max [items & {identity-fn :by :or {identity-fn identity}}]
  (->> items
       (map vector (rest (range)))
       (apply max-key (comp identity-fn second))
       first
       (#(split-at % items))))

max by identity:

user> (split-at-max [-1 20 3 4 1 3 5 101 4 2 6 4])
[(-1 20 3 4 1 3 5 101) (4 2 6 4)]

max by size:

user> (split-at-max ["i" "wanna" "rock'n'roll" "all" "night" 
                     "and"  "party" "every" "day"] 
                    :by count)
[("i" "wanna" "rock'n'roll") ("all" "night" "and" "party" "every" "day")]

or by some external value for example:

user> (split-at-max [:a :b :c :d] :by {:a 0 :b 121 :c 2 :d -100})
[(:a :b) (:c :d)]

so to me it seems more functional (and for that more "clojure way"), though probably not the most productive.

  • Quite involved but really nice! – Mallory-Erik Nov 28 '15 at 7:46
  • Well, that's why i said it was fun. Other solutions are definitely better – leetwinski Nov 28 '15 at 11:48
2

If order who goes first doesn't matter you could use this

(def up5 [1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 0])
(def up5max (apply max up5)

(->> up5 
     reverse 
     (split-with (partial > up5max)) 
     (map reverse))

#=> ((4 3 2 1 0) (1 2 3 4 5))
2

If performance is important I'd do it like this:

(defn vec-split-at [idx v]
  (if (empty? v)
    [[] []]
    [(subvec v 0 idx) (subvec v idx)]))

(defn split-at-max [xs]
  (let [m-el (reduce-kv
               (fn [max k v]
                 (if (<= v (second max))
                   max
                   [k v])) [0 (first xs)] xs)]
    (if (vector? xs)
      (vec-split-at (-> m-el first inc) xs)
      (split-at (-> m-el first inc) xs))))

(split-at-max [1 10 10 1])

It should be N + C comparisons for vectors. Where C is relatively small.

  • This is only compatible with vectors or maps, because of using reduce-kv – amirt Nov 29 '15 at 2:12
  • Why (if (vector? xs) ...)? You're told xs is a vector. Besides, xs must be an associative collection with positional indices for reduce-kv and split-at to work. Also, you can push the if down: ((if vector? xs vec-split-at split-at) (-> m-el first inc) xs), but maybe we're not used to reading conditionals in operator position. Still the best on offer. – Thumbnail Dec 1 '15 at 13:12
  • There appear to be some defects in the reduce-kv call: < should be <= to stick to the first instance of the maximum value, as the question requires; the 1 should be 0 to match the first; and the final xs might as well be (rest xs), to avoid looking at the first element twice. – Thumbnail Dec 1 '15 at 13:44
  • Thumbnail: You're right about all your comments! My version can certainly be improved. I realized to late that reduce-kv is so limited. – ClojureMostly Dec 1 '15 at 13:45
  • I've taken the liberty of making the first two corrections. The third was wrong: (rest xs) returns a sequence. (subvec xs 1) ought to work, but doesn't. Bug in reduce-kv? – Thumbnail Dec 1 '15 at 17:24
1

First, given that .indexOf is listed in the Clojure cheatsheet, I think it's idiomatic to use it.

Here are two more alternatives:

This one is similar to tnoda's second solution:

(let [[a b c] (partition-by #(< % (apply max up5) up5)]
  [(concat a b) c])
;=> [(1 2 3 4 5) (4 3 2 1)]

This next one looks more complicated, but it's more elegant in one respect: It delays the effect of < in order to include the = item, so there's no need to use conj or concat afterwards to stick the = item back into the first sequence:

(let [the-max (apply max up5)]
  (loop [the-start []
         the-rest up5
         continue? true]
    (if continue?
      (let [this-one (first the-rest)]
        (recur (conj the-start this-one)
               (rest the-rest)
               (< this-one the-max)))
      [the-start the-rest])))
;=> [[1 2 3 4 5] (4 3 2 1)]

The second element of the result is a clojure.lang.PersistentVector$ChunkedSeq, btw. For most purposes, the kind of sequence shouldn't matter, but you can apply vec to it if you really want a vector. Likewise for the results of my first example.

  • The first version is accidentally quadratic and really shouldn't be used. – ClojureMostly Nov 28 '15 at 8:50
  • Thanks @Andre. Too bad. It's so simple, eve though it obviously does a lot of unnecessary work. Maybe for small sequences .... – Mars Nov 28 '15 at 15:33
1

You can replace the indexOf() method with a combination of count and take-while if you would like to avoid bringing a Java method into Clojure world.

user> (def up5 [1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1])
#<Var@20c4449f: [1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1]>

user> (split-at (inc (count (take-while #(< % (apply max up5)) up5))) up5)
[(1 2 3 4 5) (4 3 2 1)]

However, I prefer the following solution to the former one, though this is longer than the index-based solution.

user> (let [x (apply max up5)
            [lhs rhs] (split-with #(< % x) up5)]
        [(conj (vec lhs) (first rhs)) (vec (next rhs))])
[[1 2 3 4 5] [4 3 2 1]]
  • 4
    bad idea! (apply max up5) would be called each time the predicate for take-while/split-with is being called. And it means a huge overhead. Should better first find max value, and then use it in a predicate. – leetwinski Nov 27 '15 at 14:46
  • Thank you for spotting the performance issue in my solution. I revised my answer. – tnoda Nov 27 '15 at 18:14
  • @tnoda I think the problem still exists in your first example, apply max up5 should be evaluated every time take-while wants to check its result with the next element of the collection (if i am not right correct me please...). – amirt Nov 27 '15 at 18:38
1

I started with

(defn split-at-max [v]
  (let [m (apply max v)
        n (count (take-while #(> m %) v))]
    (split-at (inc n) v)))

This is clumsy. I should use split-with instead of split-at, avoiding the need to calculate n. However, we can modify it to use vectors throughout:

(defn split-at-max [v]
  (let [m (apply max v)
        n (loop [i 0]
            (if (= (v i) m) i (recur (inc i))))
        n (inc n)]
    [(subvec v 0 n) (subvec v n)]))

This avoids realizing the split sequences, so is faster in use.

The loop finds the first occurrence of the maximum element. Taking a hint from @Mars, we could use Java ArrayList's indexOf method instead:

(defn split-at-max [v]
  (let [m (apply max v)
        n (inc (.indexOf v m))]
    [(subvec v 0 n) (subvec v n)]))

This is fast, concise, and clear.

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