12

I am writing an API with a class like this:

public class NKMPMission {
    private String name;
    private int age;
    public NKMPMission(String name, int age)
    {
         this.name  = name;
         this.age   = age;
    }
    public String getName() 
    {
       return name;
    }

    public int getAge() 
    {
       return age;
     }
   }

My Questions:

  1. How can I make sure the user of this NKMPMission class accesses only the getters?
  2. How can I introduce setters for this function so that I as a developer can set, but the user cannot set?
  • 2
    actually, an user will never acces to a getter or any method, developer will... but user will only use the application – Jordi Castilla Nov 27 '15 at 8:43
  • 2
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because does not make any sense... – Jordi Castilla Nov 27 '15 at 8:45
  • I would like to reuturn a array list of NKMPMission objects to the user. – DrunkenMaster Nov 27 '15 at 8:45
  • 1
    that's nice, but the user wont access to any method, or are you developing an API and when you say user you mean developer using your API? – Jordi Castilla Nov 27 '15 at 8:46
  • That's right Jordi, I am developing a API say getMissionList(), then i am returning a list of NKMPMission objects. – DrunkenMaster Nov 27 '15 at 8:50
21

The usual way to do this is to not expose the class at all, just expose interfaces to that class. One interface for the general public and one for developers.

You then need a factory to create them.

/**
 * Expose this interface to the public.
 */
public interface INKMPMission {

    public String getName();

    public int getAge();

}

/**
 * Only expose this interface to developers.
 */
interface IDeveloperNKMPMission {

    public void setName(String name);

    public void setAge(int age);

}

public static class NKMPMissionFactory {

    /**
     * Expose only the INKMPMission construction.
     */
    public INKMPMission make(String name, int age) {
        return new NKMPMission(name, age);
    }

    /**
     * Protected version for developers.
     */
    IDeveloperNKMPMission forDeveloper(INKMPMission it) {
        return IDeveloperNKMPMission.class.cast(it);
    }

    /**
     * Private so no-one outside the factory knows about the inner workings.
     */
    private static class NKMPMission implements INKMPMission, IDeveloperNKMPMission {

        private String name;
        private int age;

        private NKMPMission(String name, int age) {
            this.name = name;
            this.age = age;
        }

        @Override
        public String getName() {
            return name;
        }

        @Override
        public int getAge() {
            return age;
        }

        @Override
        public void setName(String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }

        @Override
        public void setAge(int age) {
            this.age = age;
        }
    }
}

For the truly paranoid you can even use a proxy. This will make it difficult (but not impossible) to use the setters through reflection.

    /**
     * Expose only the INKMPMission construction.
     */
    public INKMPMission make(String name, int age) {
        return new NKMPMissionProxy(new NKMPMission(name, age));
    }

    /**
     * Protected version for developers.
     */
    protected IDeveloperNKMPMission forDeveloper(INKMPMission it) {
        if (it instanceof NKMPMissionProxy) {
            it = ((NKMPMissionProxy) it).theMission;
        }
        return IDeveloperNKMPMission.class.cast(it);
    }

    /**
     * A proxy for the truly paranoid - makes using reflection more difficult (but not impossible)
     */
    private static class NKMPMissionProxy implements INKMPMission {
        private final NKMPMission theMission;

        private NKMPMissionProxy(NKMPMission theMission) {
            this.theMission = theMission;
        }

        @Override
        public String getName() {
            return theMission.getName();
        }

        @Override
        public int getAge() {
            return theMission.getAge();
        }


    }
6

1) How can i make sure user of this NKMPMIssion class access only getters.

You can't.

2) How can i introduce setters for this function so that as a developer i should be able to set, but the user should not be able to set.

It sounds like you're writing an API. If you return a NKMPMIssion instance from a public method of that API, the setters can be called. Even if you mark them private or protected, they can still be called via reflection. That said, usually making them non-public is sufficient. It does, at the very least, say "If you call these, you're in unsupported territory."

If you want to make it harder, you can return an instance that wraps a facade around the NKMPMIssion instance. But that just makes it harder, not impossible, since the facade instance has to have a reference to the NKMPMIssion instance, which (even if it's private) can be accessed via reflection.

4

The easiest thing is to make the API use the interface only and make the class an implementation detail.

public interface INKMPMission {        
    String getName();
    int getAge();
 }

public class SomeService{
    private class MyNKMPMission implements INKMPMission {
        //put getters and setters here
    }
    public List<INKMPMission> getMissions(){
        //put some MyNKMPMissions in a list
    }
}

Since MyNKMPMission is private the consumers will never be able do downcast and access the setters.

3

You can (in some kinda way), but you should not do it that way:

  • In each setter construct a new Exception
  • Inspect the generated Stacktrace
  • If the caller class is not within your package (or hardcode some direct classnames / methodnames) throw an IllegalAccessError

This way is neither pretty, nor fast as you have to check every single access to a setter.

Another way would be using the @CallerSensitive Annotation, though it's propritary API and is therefore not available on all plattforms / jre implementations: https://stackoverflow.com/a/22627383/1164913

The clean, and in most cases sufficent way would be using an Interface which only provides getters to the client, and returning that to the client.

2

It seems you trying to write an API. Assuming user means, developers who use your API.

In such cases, make the setter as protected and build some meaningful package structure, such that only child's and package members can see that.

If you want to protect that even from child's, there is no way other than making it private.

  • 4
    Downvoter, care to comment ? or correct us if the answer is wrong. And best thing is, add your answer, so that we can learn from that. – Suresh Atta Nov 27 '15 at 8:48
2

Answering the questions:

Q1. You can't as T.J. Crowder has said in his answer.

Q2. I would recommend you to try the following things in the following order from easiest to hardest, and take the option you consider the most suitable in terms of effort-return:

  1. Have a look to: Java access modifiers.
  2. Create an interface and expose that interface with the public methods to the "final" users of the "NKMPMission" class, as mentioned in Esben Skov Pedersen answer
  3. Finally you can do the proxy approach mentioned in OldCurmudgeon answer

What I would do:

If your set of classes is going to be used internally then I would take option 1 combined with a good javadoc and project standards, it should be enough.

In case you are creating a public API I would take the option 2.

IMHO the option 3 adds too innecessary complexity in this case, and very few benefit, since every class method or attribute can be accessed anyway throw reflection (as many people has mentioned). I think everybody is aware about the fact that access throw reflection to API's hidden methods is hacky, dangerous and not convenient for the manteinance of the projects, due to API providers are in their right to change hidden methods implementations without further notification to the final users.

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