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import numpy as np
np.random.random((5,5))

array([[ 0.26045197,  0.66184973,  0.79957904,  0.82613958,  0.39644677],
       [ 0.09284838,  0.59098542,  0.13045167,  0.06170584,  0.01265676],
       [ 0.16456109,  0.87820099,  0.79891448,  0.02966868,  0.27810629],
       [ 0.03037986,  0.31481138,  0.06477025,  0.37205248,  0.59648463],
       [ 0.08084797,  0.10305354,  0.72488268,  0.30258304,  0.230913  ]])

I have a 2D numpy array with each cell value representing a fraction (lies between 0.0 and 1.0). I want to modify the 2D array so that the array average matches a specific number say 0.8. To do that, I want to use the foll. algo:

  1. Compute average of 2D array. Say it is 0.6 for given 2D array

  2. For each cell in grid (say with a value 0.25), increase/decrease its value by an amount equal to (0.8 - 0.6 i.e 0.2).

  3. If in step 2, the change makes the cell value go beyond 0.0/1.0, then set value to 0.0/1.0 and modify other cells to compensate.

I can do steps 1 like so:

numpy.mean(arr)

I can do step 2 using a for loop, but not sure how to do step 3. Also a more pythonic way would be preferred.

2

Numpy's index magic is fun to program with:

import numpy as np
aa = np.random.random((5, 5))

m = np.mean(aa)
d = 0.8 - m  # value to add
bb = aa + d

if d > 0:  # Modify values  != 1
    ii = aa + d > 1
    d2 = np.sum(bb[ii] - 1)
    bb[ii] = 1
    bb[~ii] = bb[~ii] + d2/np.sum(~ii)
elif d < 0:  # Modify values  != 0
    ii = aa + d < 0
    d2 = np.sum(bb[ii])
    bb[ii] = 1
    bb[~ii] = bb[~ii] + d2/np.sum(~ii)

print("The mean of bb is %f" % np.mean(bb))

Out of curiosity: Isn't scaling, i.e., multiplying, instead of subtracting the more natural approach for such problems?

  • thanks @Dietrich, multiplying might work too. Your soln is good, but it does not completely solver step 3 i.e. it does not modify other cells to compensate if a particular cell value has to be bound to 0.0 or 1.0 – user308827 Nov 27 '15 at 21:24
  • 1
    I hope that I understood your question correctly. I updated the answer so that the mean is correct. I interpreted step 3 that way that either a lower or a upper bound stays constant. – Dietrich Nov 27 '15 at 21:55

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