15

I have a tuple of '0' and '1', and I want the xor of all its element. For example, if I have ('0', '1', '1', '0'), I want to obtain ((0 xor 1) xor 1) xor 0.

I have the following (working) snippet:

bit = ('0', '1', '0', '1', '0', '1', '0')
out = bit[0]
for i in range(1, len(bit)):
    out = int(out) ^ int(bit[i])
print str(out)

How can I make it in a more pythonic way (using map and a lambda function ?)

2
  • Why the extra xor 1 in the example? You had 0, 1, 1. The results should be 0 xor 1 xor 1
    – hjpotter92
    Nov 28, 2015 at 10:40
  • The title of this is confusing as XOR is not distributive. E.g. with your def XOR(1,1,1) is True, but I think most people would expect otherwise.
    – mathandy
    Feb 23, 2022 at 3:37

4 Answers 4

23
print reduce(lambda i, j: int(i) ^ int(j), bit)

reduce(...) reduce(function, sequence[, initial]) -> value

Apply a function of two arguments cumulatively to the items of a sequence, from left to right, so as to reduce the sequence to a single value. For example, reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) calculates ((((1+2)+3)+4)+5). If initial is present, it is placed before the items of the sequence in the calculation, and serves as a default when the sequence is empty.

4
  • Seems great. Can you explain a little please ?
    – Shan-x
    Nov 28, 2015 at 10:45
  • try help(reduce) in python shell
    – zephor
    Nov 28, 2015 at 10:47
  • 1
    Apply a function of two arguments cumulatively to the items of a sequence, from left to right, so as to reduce the sequence to a single value. For example, reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) calculates ((((1+2)+3)+4)+5). If initial is present, it is placed before the items of the sequence in the calculation, and serves as a default when the sequence is empty.
    – zephor
    Nov 28, 2015 at 10:47
  • 2
    reduce must be imported first: from functools import reduce Apr 13, 2022 at 15:53
5

In Python 3 you can use:

>>> from functools import reduce
>>> from operator import xor
>>> bits = ('0', '1', '0', '1', '0', '1', '0')
>>> reduce(xor, map(int, bits))
1

Or if you want a running XOR:

>>> from itertools import accumulate
>>> from operator import xor
>>> bits = ('0', '1', '0', '1', '0', '1', '0')
>>> list(accumulate(map(int, bits), xor))
[0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1]
2

As has been mentioned, reduce works well. If you read about reduce, you will come across the concept of a fold which is a higher order function (like map).

In some languages you can fold left or right. Interestingly in your case, you would get the same result if you started from the left or the right as xor is commutative and associative.

1

Kidly take a look at this version is if you are looking for a solution without using reduce or lambda function

A = [1,1,2,3,4,4,5,5]
x = 0
for i in A:
    x ^= i

print(x)
output : 3

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