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I have a function triple_count which computes the sum of 3 integers. I am attempting to use this function to construct a new function which takes an input list of integers and returns a list of sums.

Originally I tried:

triples :: [Int] -> [Int]
triples xs
  | length xs < 3 = []
  | otherwise = triple_count (take 3 xs) : triples (drop 3 xs)

Which fails because triple count's signature is Int -> Int -> Int -> [Int] and not [Int] -> [Int].

Thanks to SO and Hoogle I was able to make this work using !!.

triples :: [Int] -> [Int]
triples xs
  | length xs < 3 = []
  | otherwise = (triple_count p1 p2 p3) : triples (drop 3 xs)
  where params = take 3 xs
        p1     = params !! 0 
        p2     = params !! 1 
        p3     = params !! 2

Is there a better/more general way to split a list into individual parameters other than calling them out individually?

4

Is there a better/more general way to split a list into individual parameters other than calling them out individually?

A more readable one could be:

triples :: [Int] -> [Int]
triples (a:b:c:rest) = triple_count a b c: triples rest
triples            _ = []
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    Simpler and more readable. I did not realize that : could be chained like that in pattern matching. – Greg Nov 28 '15 at 22:31
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    This solution is, IMHO, vastly superior to the original code. More efficient: 1) it will not scan the whole list only to count its length; 2) it avoids the slow index !! n (which needs to follow n pointers). Also safer: !! 2 can crash the whole program (!) if the list is too short -- the code correctly checks that beforehand, but it's easy to forget the check/perform the wrong check; instead (exhaustive) pattern match never leads to crashes. – chi Nov 28 '15 at 23:35
  • @Greg That's just a nested pattern, just like e.g. foo (x, 0) = x or bar ((Just 0, n):mns) = ... – jberryman Nov 29 '15 at 3:13
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    @jberryman, the code I posted is part of an exercise in learning more about the language. I've subbed similar nested patterns into some earlier learning work and it's hugely clarified things. Thank you for the extra clarification. – Greg Nov 29 '15 at 6:02

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