1

I'm learning data science and would like to make dummy variables for my dataset.

I have a Dataframe that has "Product Category" column that is a list of matching categories looking like ["Category1", "Category2".."CategoryN"]

I know that Pandas has nice function that makes dummy variables automatically (pandas.get_dummies) but in this case, I can't use it, I guess(?).

I know how to loop over the each row to append 1 to matching elements of each columns. My current code is this:

for column_name in df.columns[1:]: #first column is "Product Category" and appended dummy columns (product category names) to the right previously
    for index, _ in enumerate(df[column_name][:10]): #limit 10 rows
        if column_name in df["Product Category"][index]:
            df[column_name][index] = 1    

However, the above code is not efficient and I cannot use it since I have more than 100,000 rows. I'd like to somehow do the operations on the whole array, but I can't figure out how to do it.

Could someone help?

  • Why can't you use get dummies? – cwharland Nov 28 '15 at 23:53
  • How would you use it in this case? I have a list of matching categories for each row element. – user3368526 Nov 29 '15 at 1:28
  • I think get_dummies only works if the column is a single category, not multiple categories as asked in the question. – davidshinn Nov 29 '15 at 4:50
2

I assume your problem is that every row can have multiple dummies set, so the values for "Product Category" is a column of lists of categories. Maybe this should work, although I'm not sure how memory efficient it would be.

In [1]: import pandas as pd

In [2]: df = pd.DataFrame({"Product Category": [['Category1', 'Category2'],
   ...:                                         ['Category3'],
   ...:                                         ['Category1', 'Category4'],
   ...:                                         ['Category1', 'Category3', 'Category5']]})

In [3]: df
Out[3]:
                    Product Category
0             [Category1, Category2]
1                        [Category3]
2             [Category1, Category4]
3  [Category1, Category3, Category5]

In [4]: def list_to_dict(category_list):
   ...:         n_categories = len(category_list)
   ...:         return dict(zip(category_list, [1]*n_categories))
   ...:

In [5]: df_dummies = pd.DataFrame(list(df['Product Category'].apply(list_to_dict).values)).fillna(0)

In [6]: df_new = df.join(df_dummies)

In [7]: df_new
Out[7]:
                    Product Category  Category1  Category2  Category3 Category4  Category5
0             [Category1, Category2]          1          1          0         0          0
1                        [Category3]          0          0          1         0          0
2             [Category1, Category4]          1          0          0         1          0
3  [Category1, Category3, Category5]          1          0          1         0          1
  • This code is great, worked very efficiently :) Thank you very much! – user3368526 Nov 29 '15 at 13:52
2

Using get_dummies(), you can specify which columns to transform into dummy variables. Consider the following example where multiple items can share same category but will only fall into one dummy variable:

df = pd.DataFrame({'Languages':  ['R', 'Python', 'C#', 'PHP', 'Java', 'XSLT', 'SQL'],
                   'ProductCategory':  ['Statistical', 'General Purpose', 
                                        'General Purpose', 'Web', 'General Purpose', 
                                        'Special Purpose', 'Special Purpose']})
# BEFORE
print(df)

#    Languages  ProductCategory
# 0          R      Statistical
# 1     Python  General Purpose
# 2         C#  General Purpose
# 3        PHP              Web
# 4       Java  General Purpose
# 5       XSLT  Special Purpose
# 6        SQL  Special Purpose

newdf = pd.get_dummies(df, columns=['ProductCategory'], prefix=['Categ'])
# AFTER
print(newdf)

#    Languages  Categ_General Purpose  Categ_Special Purpose  Categ_Statistical  Categ_Web
# 0         R                      0                      0                  1          0
# 1    Python                      1                      0                  0          0
# 2        C#                      1                      0                  0          0
# 3       PHP                      0                      0                  0          1
# 4      Java                      1                      0                  0          0
# 5      XSLT                      0                      1                  0          0
# 6       SQL                      0                      1                  0          0

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