36

I am struggling to make a piece of code that allows to measure time spent within a "with" statement and assigns the time measured (a float) to the variable provided in the "with" statement.

import time

class catchtime:
    def __enter__(self):
        self.t = time.clock()
        return 1

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        return time.clock() - self.t

with catchtime() as t:
    pass

This code leaves t=1 and not the difference between clock() calls. How to approach this problem? I need a way to assign a new value from within the exit method.

PEP 343 describes in more detail how contect manager works but I do not understand most of it.

1
  • @Bhargav Rao; If you think it's a dupe then why not closing it as a dupe?
    – haccks
    Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 6:30

9 Answers 9

43

Other top-rated answers here can be incorrect

As noted by @Mercury, the other top answer by @Vlad Bezden, while slick, is technically incorrect since the value yielded by t() is also potentially affected by code executed outside of the with statement. For example, if you run time.sleep(5) after the with statement but before the print statement, then calling t() in the print statement will give you ~6 sec, not ~1 sec.

In some cases, this can be avoided by inserting the print command inside the context manager as below:

from time import perf_counter
from contextlib import contextmanager


@contextmanager
def catchtime() -> Callable[[], float]:
    start = perf_counter()
    yield lambda: perf_counter() - start
    print(f'Time: {perf_counter() - start:.3f} seconds')

However, even with this modification, notice how running sleep(5) later on causes the incorrect time to be printed:

from time import sleep

with catchtime() as t:
    sleep(1)

# >>> "Time: 1.000 seconds"

sleep(5)
print(f'Time: {t():.3f} seconds')

# >>> "Time: 6.000 seconds"

Solution #1: Context Manager Approach (with fix)

This solution captures the time difference using two reference points, t1 and t2. By ensuring that t2 only updates when the context manager exits, the elapsed time within the context remains consistent even if there are delays or operations after the with block.

Here's how it works:

  • Entry Phase: Both t1 and t2 are initialized with the current timestamp when the context manager is entered. This ensures that their difference is initially zero.

  • Within the Context: No changes to t1 or t2 occur during this phase. As a result, their difference remains zero.

  • Exit Phase: Only t2 gets updated to the current timestamp when the context manager exits. This step "locks in" the end time. The difference t2 - t1 then represents the elapsed time exclusively within the context.

from time import perf_counter
from time import sleep
from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def catchtime() -> Callable[[], float]:
    t1 = t2 = perf_counter() 
    yield lambda: t2 - t1
    t2 = perf_counter() 

with catchtime() as t:
    sleep(1)

# Now external delays will no longer have an effect:

sleep(5)
print(f'Time: {t():.3f} seconds')

# Output: "Time: 1.000 seconds"

Using this method, operations or delays outside the with block will not distort the time measurement. Unlike other top-rated answers on this page, this method introduces a level of indirection where you explicitly capture the end timestamp upon exit from the context manager. This step effectively "freezes" the end time, preventing it from updating outside the context.

Solution #2: Class-Based Approach (flexible)

This approach builds upon @BrenBarn's idea but adds a few usability improvements:

  • Automated Timing Printout: Once the code block within the context completes, the elapsed time is automatically printed. To disable this, you can remove the print(self.readout) line.

  • Stored Formatted Output: The elapsed time is stored as a formatted string in self.readout, which can be retrieved and printed at any later time.

  • Raw Elapsed Time: The elapsed time in seconds (as a float) is stored in self.time for potential further use or calculations.

from time import perf_counter

class catchtime:
    def __enter__(self):
        self.start = perf_counter()
        return self

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        self.time = perf_counter() - self.start
        self.readout = f'Time: {self.time:.3f} seconds'
        print(self.readout)

As in solution #1, even if there are operations after the context manager (like sleep(5)), it does not influence the captured elapsed time.

from time import sleep

with catchtime() as timer:
    sleep(1)

# Output: "Time: 1.000 seconds"

sleep(5)
print(timer.time)

# Output: 1.000283900000009

sleep(5)
print(timer.readout)

# Output: "Time: 1.000 seconds"

This approach provides flexibility in accessing and utilizing the elapsed time, both as raw data and a formatted string.

2
  • 1
    The typing of solution #1 seems off. catchtime() should return Callable[[], float].
    – sihil
    Commented May 15 at 15:00
  • @sihil, thanks for pointing that out. I have updated the function signature to correctly return a type of Callable[[], float] in solution #1. Commented May 21 at 20:19
32

Here is an example of using contextmanager

from time import perf_counter
from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def catchtime() -> float:
    start = perf_counter()
    yield lambda: perf_counter() - start


with catchtime() as t:
    import time
    time.sleep(1)

print(f"Execution time: {t():.4f} secs")

Output:

Execution time: 1.0014 secs

4
  • 2
    Also uses perf_counter(),which is better here than time.clock(). Why isn't this in standard library?
    – Evgeny
    Commented May 1, 2021 at 10:19
  • Is this example from the "20 Python Libraries You Aren't Using (But Should)" book?
    – astroboy
    Commented May 19, 2021 at 10:40
  • 2
    Though not quite what OP asked, I can do something like start = perf_counter(); yield; print(perf_counter()-start); right? I was looking for a CM that prints out the time needed for executing stuff inside it and this looks perfect.
    – Mercury
    Commented Jul 9, 2021 at 14:50
  • 3
    @Mercury is right. This answer is incorrect since the value yielded by t() is also potentially affected by code outside of the with statement. For example, if you call time.sleep(5) after the with statement but before the print statement, then t() will give you approximately 6 sec, not 1 sec. Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 23:19
17

You can't get that to assign your timing to t. As described in the PEP, the variable you specify in the as clause (if any) gets assigned the result of calling __enter__, not __exit__. In other words, t is only assigned at the start of the with block, not at the end.

What you could do is change your __exit__ so that instead of returning the value, it does self.t = time.clock() - self.t. Then, after the with block finishes, the t attribute of the context manager will hold the elapsed time.

To make that work, you also want to return self instead of 1 from __enter__. Not sure what you were trying to achieve by using 1.

So it looks like this:

class catchtime(object):
    def __enter__(self):
        self.t = time.clock()
        return self

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        self.t = time.clock() - self.t

with catchtime() as t:
    time.sleep(1)

print(t.t)

And a value pretty close to 1 is printed.

4
  • @ArekBulski: Like I said, that's not possible. The variable in the as line is only assigned once, at the beginning of the with. This is described in the PEP. The with statement is designed to let the context manager manage the context of the code that happens inside the with block. You can fiddle witht he context manager and store data on it, but it's not supposed to be able to modify the surrounding environment in the way you seem to want.
    – BrenBarn
    Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 19:54
  • @ArekBulski: Can you explain why that aspect of it is so vital to you? Whatever you were going to do with t, just do it with t.t instead. It's not a big deal.
    – BrenBarn
    Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 19:58
  • 1
    It looks more pretty :) Half of Python idioms is about making things pretty.
    – ArekBulski
    Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 20:00
  • 1
    you could have a property .seconds or .total_seconds, I think that's prettier
    – user66081
    Commented Jun 23, 2020 at 7:18
11

Solved (almost). Resulting variable is coercible and convertible to a float (but not a float itself).

class catchtime:
    def __enter__(self):
        self.t = time.clock()
        return self

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        self.e = time.clock()

    def __float__(self):
        return float(self.e - self.t)

    def __coerce__(self, other):
        return (float(self), other)

    def __str__(self):
        return str(float(self))

    def __repr__(self):
        return str(float(self))

with catchtime() as t:
    pass

print t
print repr(t)
print float(t)
print 0+t
print 1*t

1.10000000001e-05
1.10000000001e-05
1.10000000001e-05
1.10000000001e-05
1.10000000001e-05
2
  • catchtime can't be a float because floats are immutable but you want to change it when the context exits. You could implement the float interface (see dir(float)) and work (mostly) like a float but even then you'd have problems when immutable objects such as dict keys are needed.
    – tdelaney
    Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 20:24
  • I think coersion to a float is the closest it gets to the ideal.
    – ArekBulski
    Commented Nov 29, 2015 at 20:30
7

I like this approach, which is simple to use and allows a contextual message:

from time import perf_counter
from contextlib import ContextDecorator

class cmtimer(ContextDecorator):
    def __init__(self, msg):
        self.msg = msg

    def __enter__(self):
        self.time = perf_counter()
        return self

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        elapsed = perf_counter() - self.time
        print(f'{self.msg} took {elapsed:.3f} seconds')

Use it this way:

with cmtimer('Loading JSON'):
    with open('data.json') as f:
        results = json.load(f)

Output:

Loading JSON took 1.577 seconds
3

The issue in top rated answer could be also fixed as below:

@contextmanager
def catchtime() -> float:
    start = perf_counter()
    end = start
    yield lambda: end - start
    end = perf_counter()
2

You could do it in this way below:

import time

class Exectime:

    def __enter__(self):
        self.time = time.time()
        return self
    def __exit__(self, exc_type, exc_val, exc_tb):
        self.time = time.time() - self.time



with Exectime() as ext:
    <your code here in with statement>

print('execution time is:' +str(ext.time))

It will calculate time spent to process codes within 'with' statement.

1
  • This is the cleanest and most pythonic way.
    – waykiki
    Commented Aug 7, 2023 at 7:50
1

With this implementtion you can get time during the process and any time after

from contextlib import contextmanager
from time import perf_counter


@contextmanager
def catchtime(task_name='It', verbose=True):
    class timer:
        def __init__(self):
            self._t1 = None
            self._t2 = None

        def start(self):
            self._t1 = perf_counter()
            self._t2 = None

        def stop(self):
            self._t2 = perf_counter()

        @property
        def time(self):
            return (self._t2 or perf_counter()) - self._t1

    t = timer()
    t.start()
    try:
        yield t
    finally:
        t.stop()
        if verbose:
            print(f'{task_name} took {t.time :.3f} seconds')

Usage examples:

from time import sleep

############################

# 1. will print result
with catchtime('First task'):
    sleep(1)

############################

# 2. will print result (without task name) and save result to t object
with catchtime() as t:
    sleep(1)

t.time  # operation time is saved here

############################

# 3. will not print anyhting but will save result to t object
with catchtime() as t:
    sleep(1)

t.time  # operation time is saved here
0

Here's a context manager solution that

  • keeps named times in a dict, and
  • sums up the time for contexts that are timed using the same name.

Code:

import time
from contextlib import contextmanager

class ContextTimer:
    def __init__(self):
        self.results = dict()

    def __call__(self, name: str):
        @contextmanager
        def f():
            start_time = time.perf_counter()
            yield None
            stop_time = time.perf_counter()
            duration = stop_time - start_time
            if name not in self.results:
                self.results[name] = duration
            else:
                self.results[name] += duration

        return f()

Usage:

context_timer = ContextTimer()

with context_timer("a"):
    time.sleep(0.1)

with context_timer("b"):
    time.sleep(0.2)

with context_timer("a"):
    time.sleep(0.1)

print(context_timer.results)

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