51

On the YAML specs there is a paragraph 2.11 about the question mark:

A question mark and space (“? ”) indicate a complex mapping key. Within a block collection, key: value pairs can start immediately following the dash, colon, or question mark.

This example is given:

---
? - Detroit Tigers
  - Chicago cubs
:
  - 2001-07-23

This other example also fail to be converted to XML:

%YAML 1.2
- - -
!!map {
  ? !!str "Not indented"
  : !!map {
      ? !!str "By one space"
      : !!str "By four\n  spaces\n",
      ? !!str "Flow style"
      : !!seq [
          !!str "By two",
          !!str "Also by two",
          !!str "Still by two",
        ]
    }
}

Unfortunately I don't understand what does it means. I tried to convert this to XML using codebeautify, but I get an error.

So my question is:

What does the question mark do?

3 Answers 3

123

The spec isn't very clear, but after a bit of head-scratching I figured it out. YAML has two kinds of block mapping keys: implicit and explicit. The implicit style is the kind you're familiar with:

mapping:
  foo: 1
  bar baz: 2
  "qux:quux": 3

If we load this YAML in Ruby (for example) we get the following result:

{ "mapping" =>
  { "foo"      => 1,
    "bar baz"  => 2,
    "qux:quux" => 3
  }
}

But we can also use explicit style to express the same thing:

mapping:
  ? foo
  : 1
  ? bar baz
  : 2
  ? "qux:quux"
  : 3

In other words, a line starting with ? indicates a key and a line starting with : indicates a value.

What use is that? Well, it lets us use any YAML structure as a mapping key. Want to use a sequence as a mapping key? You can! Want to use a mapping as a mapping key? Behold:

mapping:
  # Use a sequence as a key
  ? - foo
    - bar
  : 1

  # Use a mapping as a key
  ? baz: qux
  : 2

  # You can skip the value, which implies `null`
  ? quux

  # You can leave the key blank, which implies a `null` key
  ?
  : 3

  # You can even skip both the key and value, so both will be `null`
  ?

  # Or you can use a preposterously long scalar as a key
  ? |
    We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more
    perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility,
    provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare,
    and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our
    Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the
    United States of America.
  : 3

  # Or just be ridiculous
  ? - foo: bar
      baz:
      - { qux: quux }
    - stahp
  : 4

In Ruby this would yield the following delightful hash:

{ "mapping" =>
  { [ "foo", "bar" ]   => 1,
    { "baz" => "qux" } => 2,
    "quux"             => nil,
    nil                => nil,
    "We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more\nperfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility,\nprovide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare,\nand secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our\nPosterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the\nUnited States of America.\n" => 3
    [ { "foo" => "bar", "baz" => [ { "qux" => "quux" } ] }, "stahp" ] => 4
  }
}

Oh, and the "Detroit Tigers" example looks like this when Ruby parses it:

YAML.load <<YML
? - Detroit Tigers
  - Chicago cubs
:
  - 2001-07-23

? [ New York Yankees,
    Atlanta Braves ]
: [ 2001-07-02, 2001-08-12,
    2001-08-14 ]
YML
# => { [ "Detroit Tigers", "Chicago cubs" ] =>
#          [ #<Date: 2001-07-23 ((2452114j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)> ],
#      [ "New York Yankees", "Atlanta Braves" ] =>
#          [ #<Date: 2001-07-02 ((2452093j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>,
#            #<Date: 2001-08-12 ((2452134j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>,
#            #<Date: 2001-08-14 ((2452136j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)> ]
#     }
1
  • 4
    Excellent answer, this is a good reference to a lesser-well-known element of the specification.
    – dreftymac
    Sep 30, 2019 at 4:50
9

Just wanted to add that complex mapping also helps if your key is a special char. For example, if your k:v are:

!: "abc"

Such special char key is not allowed So, you do this instead:

? "!"
: "abc"
1
  • 5
    This is true, but note that you can also put mapping keys in quotes so an alternative here is "!": abc". May 19, 2022 at 21:45
2

Complex mapping types is basically useful when the key of the key/value pair is a complex type.in itself For ex: In below example AddressRatings key is Address type which is a complex type.

public class Test
{
    public Dictionary<Address, int> AddressRatings { get; set; }
}
public class Address
{
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
    public int ZipCode { get; set; }

}

YAML for this would be.. you can see how "?" is applied for the key as it is of complex type

AddressRatings:
  ? City: New Delhi
    Country: India
    ZipCode: 10011
  : 23

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