2

I am trying to compare different classes of objects in C++. Everything works well if I remove section3. But I'd like to know how to edit the comparative operators == and != to make it work without any errors? The error that I get is "no match for 'operator==' (operand types are 'Fruit' and 'Plant') "

Here is my code :

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
class Plant
{
public:
    Plant(std::string name) : type_(name)
    { }

    bool operator==(const Plant &that) const
    { return type_ == that.type_; }

    bool operator!=(const Plant &that) const
    { return !operator==(that); }

    void print()
    { std::cout << type_ << std::endl; }

protected:
    std::string type_;
};

class Fruit: public Plant
{
public:
    Fruit(std::string name, std::string taste)
        : Plant(name)
        , taste_(taste)
    { }

    bool operator==(const Fruit& that) const
    {
        return ( (taste_ == that.taste_) && (Plant::operator==(that)) );
    }

    bool operator!=(const Fruit& that) const
    {
        return !operator==(that);
    }

    void print()
    {
        Plant::print();
        std::cout << taste_ << std::endl;
    }

private:
    std::string taste_;
};


int main()
{
    Plant a("Maple");
    a.print();
    Plant b("Maple");

    if (a == b)
    {
        std::cout << "a and b are equal" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout << "a and b are not equal" << std::endl;
    }

    Fruit c("Apple","sweet");
    c.print();
    Fruit d("Apple","sweet");

    if (c == d)
    {
        std::cout << "c and d are equal" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout << "c and d are not equal" << std::endl;
    }

    if (a == c)
    {
        std::cout << "a and c are equal" << std::endl;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout << "a and c are not equal" << std::endl;
    }

    /* Section 3 */
    if (c == a)
    { std::cout <<"c and a are equal\n"<< std::endl; }
    else
    { std::cout <<"c and a are not equal\n"<< std::endl; }

    if (a != c)
    { std::cout <<"c and a are not equal\n"<< std::endl; }
    else
    { std::cout <<"c and a are equal\n"<< std::endl; }
    return 0;
}

Thanks ..

6
  • Operators and inheritance don't play nice. Your Fruit is trying to compare the other object as a Fruit, but Plants aren't necessarily Fruit. This is actually not a simple problem to solve. One way is virtual operators and using RTTI to find out the type of the other object. – Neil Kirk Nov 30 '15 at 5:42
  • How should these comparisons behave? (in your design). For example, what if someone compares a Fruit with a Carrot? – M.M Nov 30 '15 at 5:53
  • If you include in the Fruit class: using Plant::operator==;, then your comparisons will compile and use Plant::operator== to do the comparison – M.M Nov 30 '15 at 5:55
  • Doesn't a != c compile? – Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 30 '15 at 5:57
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf no – Lucyia Nov 30 '15 at 6:07
1

You can add non-member functions,

bool operator==(Fruit const& f, Plant const& p)
{
   return false;
}

bool operator!=(Fruit const& f, Plant const& p)
{
   return !(f == p);
}

This will work for one sub-type of Plant. This approach is not scalable. If you create more sub-types of Plant, you'll need to use a different approach.

1

You have to either implement comparitor operators to compare Fruit and Plant or downcast the Fruit to a plant in the comparison:

bool operator==(const Plant& plant, const Fruit& fruit) { /* test here */ }
bool operator==(const Fruit& fruit, const Plant& plant) { return (plant == fruit); }

Or if you have pointers:

Fruit* fruit = new Fruit("apple", "sour");
Plant* plant = new Plant("maple"); 
if(*plant == *static_cast<Plant*>(fruit)) {}
13
  • How should a Plant and a Fruit compare? – Neil Kirk Nov 30 '15 at 5:48
  • If it is pointers they can... Plant* fruit = new Fruit("apple", "sour"); If it makes sense is another question. But in that case one can compare pointers – CJCombrink Nov 30 '15 at 5:52
  • What I mean is, logically speaking, how should the two compare? I would think a Plant and a Fruit should always compare unequal. – Neil Kirk Nov 30 '15 at 5:54
  • I agree with you, I don't even think that a fruit is a plant... Since it is a coding question, I gave a code example that is valid. For the practicality of the answer the user should decide. – CJCombrink Nov 30 '15 at 5:56
  • 1
    Well a Fruit is a plant, surely we can agree on that? – Neil Kirk Nov 30 '15 at 5:58
1

It's bit unclear what you're trying to achieve, but apparently it involves dynamic type checking where two objects compare equal if they dynamically are of some common base type X and are equal according to some criterion specified in that base type.

Finding the common type X is in general a thorny problem, because C++ supports multiple inheritance. But if one assumes, for simplicity, single inheritance, that is, the case where each class has at most one base class, then one can let one of the objects that are involved in a comparison, walk up the base class chain and use e.g. dynamic_cast to check if the other object is of this type, e.g. like this:

#include <string>
#include <utility>      // std::move

using Byte_string = std::string;

class Base
{
private:
    Byte_string s_;

protected:
    virtual
    auto equals( Base const& other ) const
        -> bool
    { return s_ == other.s_; }

public:
    friend
    auto operator==( Base const& a, Base const& b )
        -> bool
    { return a.equals( b ); }

    explicit Base( Byte_string s )
        : s_( move( s ) )
    {}
};

class Derived
    : public Base
{
private:
    Byte_string t_;

protected:
    auto equals( Base const& other ) const
        -> bool override
    {
        if( auto p_other = dynamic_cast<Derived const*>( &other ) )
        {
            return Base::equals( other ) and t_ == p_other->t_;
        }
        return Base::equals( other );
    }

public:
    Derived( Byte_string s, Byte_string t )
        : Base( move( s ) )
        , t_( move( t ) )
    {}
};

class Most_derived
    : public Derived
{
private:
    int u_;

protected:
    auto equals( Base const& other ) const
        -> bool override
    {
        if( auto p_other = dynamic_cast<Most_derived const*>( &other ) )
        {
            return Derived::equals( other ) and u_ == p_other->u_;
        }
        return Derived::equals( other );
    }

    Most_derived( Byte_string s, Byte_string t, int u )
        : Derived( move( s ), move( t ) )
        , u_( u )
    {}

};

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
auto main() -> int
{
    Base a( "Maple" );
    Base b( "Maple" );
    cout << "a and b are " << (a == b? "" : "not ") << "equal.\n";

    Derived c( "Apple", "sweet" );
    Derived d( "Apple", "sweet" );
    cout << "c and d are " << (c == d? "" : "not ") << "equal.\n";

    cout << "a and c are " << (a == c? "" : "not ") << "equal.\n";
    cout << "c and a are " << (c == a? "" : "not ") << "equal.\n";

    Base& x = d;
    cout << "x and c are " << (x == c? "" : "not ") << "equal.\n";
    cout << "c and x are " << (c == x? "" : "not ") << "equal.\n";

}
1
  • auto main() -> int made me smile :) – Joel Cornett Nov 30 '15 at 6:44

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