In an HTML table, the cellpadding and cellspacing can be set like this:

<table cellspacing="1" cellpadding="1">

How can the same be accomplished using CSS?

  • 3
    Just a general suggestion, check to see if your style.css does a "reset" on your tables before trying these solutions. Example: If you don't have tables set to width:auto then border-collapse might not work as expected. – PJ Brunet Sep 1 '16 at 7:12
  • 1
    Use border-spacing on table and padding on td. – Anubhav May 23 '17 at 9:17

26 Answers 26

up vote 3233 down vote accepted

Basics

For controlling "cellpadding" in CSS, you can simply use padding on table cells. E.g. for 10px of "cellpadding":

td { 
    padding: 10px;
}

For "cellspacing", you can apply the border-spacing CSS property to your table. E.g. for 10px of "cellspacing":

table { 
    border-spacing: 10px;
    border-collapse: separate;
}

This property will even allow separate horizontal and vertical spacing, something you couldn't do with old-school "cellspacing".

Issues in IE <= 7

This will work in almost all popular browsers except for Internet Explorer up through Internet Explorer 7, where you're almost out of luck. I say "almost" because these browsers still support the border-collapse property, which merges the borders of adjoining table cells. If you're trying to eliminate cellspacing (that is, cellspacing="0") then border-collapse:collapse should have the same effect: no space between table cells. This support is buggy, though, as it does not override an existing cellspacing HTML attribute on the table element.

In short: for non-Internet Explorer 5-7 browsers, border-spacing handles you. For Internet Explorer, if your situation is just right (you want 0 cellspacing and your table doesn't have it defined already), you can use border-collapse:collapse.

table { 
    border-spacing: 0;
    border-collapse: collapse;
}

Note: For a great overview of CSS properties that one can apply to tables and for which browsers, see this fantastic Quirksmode page.

  • 17
    cellpadding="0" can still make a difference in Chrome 13.0.782.215, even if border-collapse:collapse and border-spacing are applied to the table. – Lee Aug 25 '11 at 3:01
  • 5
    @LeeWhitney you need to set padding: 0 on your table cells. – Martin Ørding-Thomsen Nov 29 '11 at 10:09
  • 5
    It's little bit off topic, but cellpadding and cellspacing attributes are removed in HTML5, so CSS is the only way to go now. – Ignas2526 Nov 22 '13 at 19:10
  • 9
    Hi, all. I've updated the answer for clarity, including a section on cellpadding, which I'd thought was obvious (just use "padding"). Hope it's more useful now. – Eric Nguyen Dec 16 '13 at 6:27
  • 2
    True, @vapcguy, in any of the infinitely variable other situations you may be styling a table in, you will need to define more specific selectors. The above are marked as examples. – Eric Nguyen Apr 1 '15 at 20:41

Default

The default behavior of the browser is equivalent to:

table {border-collapse: collapse;}
td    {padding: 0px;}

         enter image description here

Cellpadding

Sets the amount of space between the contents of the cell and the cell wall

table {border-collapse: collapse;}
td    {padding: 6px;}

        enter image description here

Cellspacing

Controls the space between table cells

table {border-spacing: 2px;}
td    {padding: 0px;}

        enter image description here

Both

table {border-spacing: 2px;}
td    {padding: 6px;}

        enter image description here

Both (special)

table {border-spacing: 8px 2px;}
td    {padding: 6px;}

        enter image description here

Note: If there is border-spacing set, it indicates border-collapse property of the table is separate.

Try it yourself!

Here you can find the old html way of achieving this.

  • 1
    How is the spacing around the table disappearing? When I set "border-spacing: 8px 12px, it adds the spacing not just between, but between the table border and the outside cells! But that is not depicted in the images here; they are flush left. – Kaz Nov 19 '13 at 1:14
  • 1
    @2astalavista And unfortunately if someone wants the effect of the exterior spacing deleted, it won't work this way with these CSS attributes. – Kaz Nov 19 '13 at 18:07
  • @Kaz You might need use negative margin to hide that annoying part. – user669677 Nov 20 '13 at 9:59
  • 1
    The default padding on TD is typically 1px, not 0 – Jan M Nov 5 '14 at 15:40
table
{
    border-collapse: collapse; /* 'cellspacing' equivalent */
}

table td, table th
{
    padding: 0; /* 'cellpadding' equivalent */
}
  • 2
    This is actually the only thing that I could get to work for me, although I applied the info to an id to avoid being overly general. – Kzqai Nov 15 '11 at 16:50
  • 18
    That's cellspacing=0 equivalent. The equivalent for cellspacing=1 is completely different. See the accepted answer. – TRiG Jul 25 '12 at 14:08
  • 3
    Shouldn't table td and table th just be td and th respectively? It works either way, but a smaller selector means slightly faster matching – Cole Johnson Jan 29 '13 at 20:13
  • 1
    @Cole Actually, I think it should be table > tr > td and table > tr > th. This is almost as fast as tr and th, and it is guaranteed to work if you have a nested table. Just my 2c – aboveyou00 Aug 13 '13 at 3:41
  • @aboveyou00 but is the table selector needed? IIRC, a <td> is invalid unless inside a <tr>. – Cole Johnson Aug 13 '13 at 3:43

Setting margins on table cells doesn't really have any effect as far as I know. The true CSS equivalent for cellspacing is border-spacing - but it doesn't work in Internet Explorer.

You can use border-collapse: collapse to reliably set cell spacing to 0 as mentioned, but for any other value I think the only cross-browser way is to keep using the cellspacing attribute.

  • 45
    In today's age that reality is suckage to the Nth degree. – John K Jul 9 '10 at 2:36
  • 7
    This is almost correct, but border-collapse only works in IE 5-7 if the table doesn't already have a cellspacing attribute defined. I've written a comprehensive answer that merges all the correct parts of the other answers on this page in case that's helpful. – Eric Nguyen Jul 9 '10 at 2:36
  • To be honest, who cares about Internet Explorer? Anyone who uses it should know broken websites are their fault - for using such a low-quality browser. Websites shouldn't have to deal with this. Let Internet Explorer become lost. Forget support for it. We don't need it, and it's a pain to develop for. – Dev Feb 14 '17 at 13:29

This hack works for Internet Explorer 6 and later, Google Chrome, Firefox, and Opera:

table {
    border-collapse: separate;
    border-spacing: 10px; /* cellspacing */
    *border-collapse: expression('separate', cellSpacing = '10px');
}

table td, table th {
    padding: 10px; /* cellpadding */
}

The * declaration is for Internet Explorer 6 and 7, and other browsers will properly ignore it.

expression('separate', cellSpacing = '10px') returns 'separate', but both statements are run, as in JavaScript you can pass more arguments than expected and all of them will be evaluated.

  • for those attempting responsive emails, note that * is not recognized by outlook 2007+ (uses word as a render engine) campaignmonitor.com/css – ptim Sep 14 '13 at 5:42

For those who want a non-zero cellspacing value, the following CSS worked for me, but I'm only able to test it in Firefox. See the Quirksmode link posted elsewhere for compatibility details. Seems it may not work with older Internet Explorer versions.

table {
    border-collapse: separate;
    border-spacing: 2px;
}

The simple solution to this problem is:

table
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    border-collapse: collapse;
    border-spacing: 0px;
}
table td
{
    padding: 8px 8px;
}

Also, if you want cellspacing="0", don't forget to add border-collapse: collapse in your table's stylesheet.

Wrap the contents of the cell with a div and you can do anything you want, but you have to wrap every cell in a column to get a uniform effect. For example, to just get wider left & right margins:

So the CSS will be,

div.cellwidener {
  margin: 0px 15px 0px 15px;
}
td.tight {
  padding: 0px;
}
<table border="0">
  <tr>
    <td class="tight">
      <div class="cellwidener">My content</div>
    </td>
  </tr>
</table>

Yes, it's a hassle. Yes, it works with IE. In fact, I've only tested this with IE, because that's all we're allowed to use at work.

  • I wish I could upvote more... First example that didn't repeat the others and one that shows how to limit the effect to a single table or cell, instead of to all of them on the page!!! – vapcguy Feb 26 '15 at 5:25

Just using border-collapse: collapse for your table, and padding for th or td

TBH. For all the fannying around with CSS you might as well just use cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" since they are not deprecated...

Anyone else suggesting margins on <td>'s obviously has not tried this.

  • 32
    They are actually deprecated in html5. – Kzqai Nov 15 '11 at 16:49

This style is for Full Reset for tables - cellpadding, cellspacing and borders.

I had this style in my reset.css file:

table{
    border:0;          /* Replace border */
    border-spacing: 0px; /* Replace cellspacing */
    border-collapse: collapse; /* Patch for Internet Explorer 6 and Internet Explorer 7 */
}
table td{
    padding: 0px;/*replace cellpadding*/
}

From what I understand from the W3C classifications is that <table>s are meant for displaying data 'only'.

Based on that I found it a lot easier to create a <div> with the backgrounds and all that and have a table with data floating over it using position: absolute; and background: transparent;...

It works on Chrome, IE(6 and later) and Mozilla(2 and later).

Margins are used (or meant anyways) to create a spacer between container elements, like <table>, <div> and <form>, not <tr>, <td>, <span> or <input>. Using it for anything other than container elements will keep you busy adjusting your website for future browser updates.

  • 6
    OP never stated what was he using table for. – Alfabravo Oct 11 '12 at 15:24
table th,td {
    padding: 8px 2px;
}
table {
    border-collapse: separate;
    border-spacing: 2px;
}

Simply use CSS padding rules with table data:

td { 
    padding: 20px;
}

And for border spacing:

table { 
    border-spacing: 1px;
    border-collapse: collapse;
}

However, it can create problems in older version of browsers like Internet Explorer because of the diff implementation of the box model.

CSS:

selector{
    padding:0 0 10px 0; // Top left bottom right 
}

Try this:

table {
    border-collapse: separate;
    border-spacing: 10px;
}
table td, table th {
    padding: 10px;
}

Or try this:

table {
    border-collapse: collapse;
}
table td, table th {
    padding: 10px;
}

I used !important after the border-collapse like

border-collapse: collapse !important;

and it works for me in IE7. It seems to override the cellspacing attribute.

  • 8
    !important would only be needed to override other CSS settings in a complex situation (and even then mostly a wrong approach). – Jukka K. Korpela May 30 '13 at 10:37
  • Also a repeat of Dan's answer, just adds the !important, which could have been included as a comment instead of another answer. – vapcguy Feb 26 '15 at 5:26
<table>
    <tr>
        <th>Col 1</th>
        <th>Col 2</th>
        <th>Col 3</th>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>1</td>
        <td>2</td>
        <td>3</td>
    </tr>
</table>

cell-padding can be given by padding in CSS while cell-spacing can be set by setting border-spacing for table.

table {
    border-spacing: 10px;
}
td {
    padding: 10px;
}

Fiddle.

td {
    padding: npx; //for cellpadding
    margin: npx; //for cellspacing
    border-collapse: collapse; //for showing borders in a better shape.
}

if margin didn't work, try to set display of tr to block and then margin will work.

For table cellspacing and cellpadding are obsolete in HTML 5. Now for cellspacing you have to use border-spacing And for cellpadding you have to use border-collapse.

And make sure you don't use this in your HTML5 code. Always try to use these values in CSS-3 file.

table{border-spacing:4px; color: #000; background:#ccc; }
td{padding-left:4px;}

You can easily set padding inside the table cells using the CSS padding property, it is valid way to produce the same effect as table's cellpadding attribute.

table,
th,
td {
  border: 1px solid #666;
}

table th,
table td {
  padding: 10px;
  /* Apply cell padding */
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>

  <meta charset="utf-8">
  <title>Set Cellpadding in CSS</title>

</head>

<body>

  <table>
    <thead>
      <tr>
        <th>Row</th>
        <th>First Name</th>
        <th>Last Name</th>
        <th>Email</th>
      </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
      <tr>
        <td>1</td>
        <td>Clark</td>
        <td>Kent</td>
        <td>clarkkent@mail.com</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>2</td>
        <td>Peter</td>
        <td>Parker</td>
        <td>peterparker@mail.com</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>3</td>
        <td>John</td>
        <td>Rambo</td>
        <td>johnrambo@mail.com</td>
      </tr>
    </tbody>
  </table>

</body>
</html>

Similarly, you can use the CSS border-spacing property to apply the spacing between adjacent table cell borders like the cellspacing attribute. However, in order to work border-spacing the value of border-collapse property muse be separate, which is default.

table {
  border-collapse: separate;
  border-spacing: 10px;
  /* Apply cell spacing */
}

table,
th,
td {
  border: 1px solid #666;
}

table th,
table td {
  padding: 5px;
  /* Apply cell padding */
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>

  <meta charset="utf-8">
  <title>Set Cellspacing in CSS</title>

</head>

<body>

  <table>
    <thead>
      <tr>
        <th>Row</th>
        <th>First Name</th>
        <th>Last Name</th>
        <th>Email</th>
      </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
      <tr>
        <td>1</td>
        <td>Clark</td>
        <td>Kent</td>
        <td>clarkkent@mail.com</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>2</td>
        <td>Peter</td>
        <td>Parker</td>
        <td>peterparker@mail.com</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>3</td>
        <td>John</td>
        <td>Rambo</td>
        <td>johnrambo@mail.com</td>
      </tr>
    </tbody>
  </table>

</body>
</html>

In an HTML table, the cellpadding and cellspacing can be set like this:

For Cell-Padding: Just call simple td/th cell padding

EX:

/******Call-Padding**********/

table { 
    border-collapse: collapse;
}

td { 
  border: 1px solid red;
  padding: 10px;
}
<table>
		<tr>
			<th>Head1 </th>
			<th>Head2 </th>
			<th>Head3 </th>
			<th>Head4 </th>
		</tr>
		<tr>
			<td>11</td>
			<td>12</td>
			<td>13</td>
			<td>14</td>
		</tr>
		<tr>
			<td>21</td>
			<td>22</td>
			<td>23</td>
			<td>24</td>
		</tr>
		<tr> 
			<td>31</td>
			<td>32</td>
			<td>33</td>
			<td>34</td>
		</tr>
		<tr>
			<td>41</td>
			<td>42</td>
			<td>43</td>
			<td>44</td>
		</tr>
	</table>

table { 
    border-collapse: collapse;
}

td { 
  border: 1px solid red;
  padding: 10px;
}

For Cell-Spacing

Just call simple table border-spacing

EX:

/********* Cell-Spacing   ********/
table { 
    border-spacing: 10px;
    border-collapse: separate;
}

td { 
  border: 1px solid red;
}
<table>
		<tr>
			<th>Head1</th>
			<th>Head2</th>
			<th>Head3</th>
			<th>Head4</th>
		</tr>
		<tr>
			<td>11</td>
			<td>12</td>
			<td>13</td>
			<td>14</td>
		</tr>
		<tr>
			<td>21</td>
			<td>22</td>
			<td>23</td>
			<td>24</td>
		</tr>
		<tr> 
			<td>31</td>
			<td>32</td>
			<td>33</td>
			<td>34</td>
		</tr>
		<tr>
			<td>41</td>
			<td>42</td>
			<td>43</td>
			<td>44</td>
		</tr>
	</table>

/********* Cell-Spacing   ********/
table { 
    border-spacing: 10px;
    border-collapse: separate;
}

td { 
  border: 1px solid red;
}

More table style by CSS source link here you get more table style by css

You can simply do something like this in your CSS, using border-spacing and padding:

table {
  border-collapse: collapse;
}

td, th {
  padding: 1em;
  border: 1px solid blue;
}
<table>
  <tr>
    <th>head_1</th>
    <th>head_2</th>
    <th>head_3</th>
    <th>head_4</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>txt_1</td>
    <td>txt_2</td>
    <td>txt_3</td>
    <td>txt_4</td>
  </tr>
</table>

  • The border-spacing rule is ignored when borders are collapsed. – dgrogan Sep 6 '17 at 19:49

How about adding the style directly to the table itself? This is instead of using table in your CSS, which is a BAD approach if you have multiple tables on your page:

<table style="border-collapse: separate;border-spacing: 2px;">
    <tr>
        <td style="padding: 4px 4px;">Some Text</td>
    </tr>
</table>
  • 2
    Putting "style" in the table tag is worse than putting "table#someId" in your css, since styling should get separated from content. But the main point of the question is how to convert the deprecated html into proper css. Which you've correctly done, but you've not really added anything with your answer, and are focusing on an unrelated issue. – Teepeemm Mar 28 '15 at 2:53
  • Nothing added?! What I added was to focus on how every other answer here basically says to use td { padding: ... } or table { border-spacing: ... } , instead of applying it directly to the table. Those add nothing. As I said, when you have multiple tables on your page & don't want to affect them, you don't want to this! We don't need a whole page of answers saying "Use the stylesheet!", when maybe that's the last thing you want, because you only want formatting for one cell or table. That's when applying it to table or td is undesirable & creating a whole new class for it is overkill. – vapcguy Mar 28 '15 at 3:03
  • Every other answer uses a stylesheet because the original question was "how can I do this with css". If the question had been "how can I have css affect only this one table", then your answer would be more appropriate (although I would still favor table#someId). – Teepeemm Mar 28 '15 at 4:09
  • Technically, inline styling is still CSS, just not using a stylesheet, but I get your point. – vapcguy Apr 1 '15 at 0:15
  • 1
    Because the idea behind a class is for reusability. For a one-off, that makes little sense and is overkill, IMHO. – vapcguy Apr 11 '15 at 8:13

protected by Mr. Alien May 8 '13 at 6:43

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