3

Here's a simple taxonomy (labels and IDs):

test_data <- data.frame(
  cat_id = c(661, 197, 228, 650, 126, 912, 949, 428),
  cat_h1 = c(rep("Animals", 5), rep("Plants", 3)),
  cat_h2 = c(rep("Mammals", 3), rep("Birds", 2), c("Wheat", "Grass", "Other")),
  cat_h3 = c("Dogs", "Dogs", "Other", "Hawks", "Other", rep(NA, 3)),
  cat_h4 = c("Big", "Little", rep(NA, 6)))

The parsed structure should match the following:

list(
  Animals = list(Mammals = list(Dogs  = list(Big = 661, Little = 197), Other = 228),
                 Birds   = list(Hawks = 650, Other = 126)),
  Plants  = list(Wheat = 912, Grass = 949, Other = 428))
6

If you are OK with the order changing slightly, this is a recursive solution that processes by column:

f <- function(x, d=cbind(x,NA)) {
    c( 
       # call f by branch
       if(ncol(d) > 3) local({
         x <- d[!is.na(d[[3]]),] 
         by( x[-2], droplevels(x[2]), f, x=NA, simplify=FALSE) 
       }), 
       # leaf nodes
       setNames(as.list(d[[1]]), d[[2]])[is.na(d[[3]])] 
    )
}

which will give this:

> str(f(test_data))
List of 2
 $ Animals:List of 2
  ..$ Birds  :List of 2
  .. ..$ Hawks: num 650
  .. ..$ Other: num 126
  ..$ Mammals:List of 2
  .. ..$ Dogs :List of 2
  .. .. ..$ Big   : num 661
  .. .. ..$ Little: num 197
  .. ..$ Other: num 228
 $ Plants :List of 3
  ..$ Wheat: num 912
  ..$ Grass: num 949
  ..$ Other: num 428
  • Nice! The closest I got using similar by/split logic was with(test_data, Map(split, split(cat_id, cat_h1), split(cat_h2, cat_h1))) before it all fell apart. – thelatemail Dec 1 '15 at 1:10
  • Order is unimportant! And recursion is OK. Thank you very much! – dholstius Dec 3 '15 at 0:46
3

Maybe not the most efficient, but not too hard:

Create data:

test_data <- data.frame(
  cat_id = c(661, 197, 228, 650, 126, 912, 949, 428),
  cat_h1 = c(rep("Animals", 5), rep("Plants", 3)),
  cat_h2 = c(rep("Mammals", 3), rep("Birds", 2), c("Wheat", "Grass", "Other")),
  cat_h3 = c("Dogs", "Dogs", "Other", "Hawks", "Other", rep(NA, 3)),
  cat_h4 = c("Big", "Little", rep(NA, 6)))

Loop through the data frame and build the list/tree:

tax <- list()  ## initialize
for (i in 1:nrow(test_data)) {
    ## convert data.frame row to character vector
    taxdat <- sapply(test_data[i,-1],as.character)
    taxstr <- character(0)  ## initialize taxon string
    ntax <- length(na.omit(taxdat))
    for (j in 1:ntax) {
        taxstr <- c(taxstr,taxdat[j])  ## build string
        if (is.null(tax[[taxstr]])) {
            tax[[taxstr]] <- list()  ## initialize if necessary
        }
    }
    tax[[taxstr]] <- test_data$cat_id[i]  ## assign value to tip
}

Compare result to desired:

res <- list(
  Animals = list(Mammals = list(Dogs  = list(Big = 661, Little = 197),
                 Other = 228),
                 Birds   = list(Hawks = 650, Other = 126)),
  Plants  = list(Wheat = 912, Grass = 949, Other = 428))

all.equal(res,tax)  ## TRUE
  • I feel like there has to be a solution with Reduce() or split(), but it's just not coming to me. – thelatemail Dec 1 '15 at 0:39
  • @TheTime +1 for the pointer to the 'data.tree' package. Thanks! – dholstius Dec 3 '15 at 0:48
1

I would avoid list structures in preference to tidy data. Here is a way to reduce the redundancy in the data.

library(dplyr)

h1_h2 = 
  test_data %>%
  select(cat_h1, cat_h2) %>%
  distinct %>%
  filter(cat_h2 %>% is.na %>% `!`)

h2_h3 =
  test_data %>%
  select(cat_h2, cat_h3) %>%
  distinct %>%
  filter(cat_h3 %>% is.na %>% `!`)

h3_h4 = 
  test_data %>%
  select(cat_h3, cat_h4) %>%
  distinct %>%
  filter(cat_h4 %>% is.na %>% `!`)

The original can be easily reconstituted:

h1_h2 %>%
  left_join(h2_h3) %>%
  left_join(h3_h4)

Edit: And here's a way to automate the whole process.

library(dplyr)
library(lazyeval)

adjacency = function(data) {
  adjacency_table = function(data, larger_name, smaller_name)
    lazy(data %>%
           select(larger_name, smaller_name) %>%
           distinct %>%
           filter(smaller_name %>% is.na %>% `!`) ) %>%
    interp(larger_name = larger_name %>% as.name, 
           smaller_name = smaller_name %>% as.name) %>%
    lazy_eval %>%
    setNames(c("larger", "smaller"))

  data_frame(smaller_name = data %>% names) %>%
    mutate(larger_name = smaller_name %>% lag) %>%
    slice(-1) %>%
    group_by(larger_name, smaller_name) %>%
    do(adjacency_table(data, .$larger_name, .$smaller_name) )
}

result = 
  test_data %>%
  select(-cat_id) %>%
  adjacency
  • 5
    But this isn't at all what the OP asked for. I can appreciate "that's not a great way to do it, this is better", but this seems pretty badly off-topic ... – Ben Bolker Nov 30 '15 at 23:42
  • @BenBolker It is technically off topic but actually (fortuitously?) anticipated my immediate need, which was to re-represent the tree in adjacency-list form (as opposed to the original "column lineage" form)! – dholstius Dec 3 '15 at 0:38
  • I can see this being generalized, wrapped in 'lapply' and then piped to 'bind_rows'. Maybe 1 step away from a 'Reduce'. But --- and this is not represented in the OP --- there is the potential issue of ambiguities/conflicts arising if there are two or more nodes having the same label (but distinct paths starting from the root). – dholstius Dec 3 '15 at 0:45
  • I've edited with a new automated version. Yes, there is the potential of ambiguities. If it is indeed the case, however, that two or more nodes can have the same label but distinct paths, there isn't actually redundancy in the original table, and it can be left as is. – bramtayl Dec 3 '15 at 1:12

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