8

Please, suppose that architecture:

public class Mammal
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Dog : Mammal
{
    public int TailId { get; set; }
    public Tail Tail { get; set; }
}

public class Bat : Mammal
{
    public int WingId { get; set; }
    public Wing Wing { get; set; }
}

public class Buffalo : Mammal
{
    public virtual ICollection<Horn> Horns { get; set; }
}

public class Tail
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    ...
}

public class Wing
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    ...
}

public class Horn
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    ...
}

Now, my context:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Mammal> Mammals { get; set; }
}

So, I want to make ONLY ONE sql query, and include (and load) all nested entities, something like:

var query = myContext.Mammals
    .IncludeIfTypeIs<Dog>(d => d.Tail)
    .IncludeIfTypeIs<Bat>(b => b.Wing)
    .IncludeIfTypeIs<Buffalo>(b => b.Horns)
    ...
    ...
;

I know that I can do that separately, but I don't want because I have many entities, and I need to minimize database requests.

I don't want use lazy loading because this will make many database requests also.

How to achieve that?

4
  • I think this is not possible as include works on collection and based on that it prepare the query and performs sql joins but for your case it seems to be working on individual instance of Mammal which I believe would totally defeat the purpose of the linq to sql. Dec 1 '15 at 12:03
  • Thanks for your comment, but I don't think that will defeat the purpose of linq to sql. Wihout this I am obliged to create one query for each mamal type and call all that separtely, thats will lags and complicate my application. In my application, I can have, for example, diferents types of Horns, with different properties, and I want also to load these properties conditionnally... Dec 1 '15 at 12:07
  • Wouldn't you require to iterate over all the mamals and check their types and include it only if it is of that type....? Dec 1 '15 at 12:14
  • Yes, but my request must include all mammal types. A need a list of all mamals with all nested properties loaded. Of course, I can iterate and load these properties, but will generate millions of database requests... Dec 1 '15 at 12:17
2

EF Core supports this in version 2.1 and higher. See the Github Issue here

var query = myContext.Mammals
    .Include(d => (d as Dog).Tail)
    .Include(b => (b as Bat).Wing)
    .Include(b => (b as Buffalo).Horns)

This will include all the properties in one query.

Here is a link to the official documentation on this.

0

Can you try something like this:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IQueryable<Mammal> IncludeExtraEntities<Mammal,T>(this IQueryable<Mammal> query, T derivedType) where T :Mammal
    {
        if (derivedType is Dog)
            return query.Include("Tail");
        if (derivedType is Bat)
            return query.Include("Wing");
        return query;
    }
}

Then in your db call:

var query = myContext.Mammals.IncludeExtraEntities(typeof(Dog));

Maybe this will work.

6
  • No, this not works, because I need to load nested entities for all types, in the same query. Dec 1 '15 at 12:51
  • 1
    But how do you get the type? Do you mean the type of any Mammal that would be fetched by your query? So if one of the mammals is a dog, load the tails for that one result, if another is a bat, load the wings for that result? Dec 1 '15 at 12:54
  • 2
    Afaik it's not possibel to eager load entities of different derived types Dec 1 '15 at 12:57
  • Yes, this is exactly what I want... I suspected that is not possible Dec 1 '15 at 12:58
  • You can do one query for every derived type, eager load them and put the results together perhaps. That will save a lot of db calls. Dec 1 '15 at 13:03
0

You could create a method to include a list of expressions. (or perhaps an extension method).

public static IQueryable<Mammal> GetMammals(params Expression<Func<T, Object>>[] includeExps)
{
     var query = context.Mammals.AsQueryable();
     if (includeExps != null)
        query = includeExps.Aggregate(query, (current, exp) => current.Include(exp));

     return query;

}

And then, in your code:

//Bat and Dog will be included here
var mammals = GetMammals(i => i.Bat, i => i.Dog);

Hope it helps!

2
  • This not works. I suppose that your type T is Mammal (you don't specify that). So, if I call GetMammals, this waits a property of a Mammal (Dog and Bat is a Mammal Type, not a property). If I try to do m => m.Wing, for example, it will not compile because Mammal hasn't property Wing (Bat has this property). So, the conditional include must convert le type before to include.... Dec 1 '15 at 15:00
  • Oh, I misunderstood. So, I believe it is not possible, like @Alexander Derck said
    – Fabio Luz
    Dec 1 '15 at 16:38
0

The question is, how would you load properties of derived types, using only a DbSet of the base class and without lazy loading? I am afraid this is not possible.

You can however do this:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Mammal> Mammals { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Dog>    Dogs    { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Bat>    Bats    { get; set; }
}

You could also simply implement one method, type-specific for each of your types

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IQueryable<Dog> IncludeExtraEntities<Dog>(this IQueryable<Dog> query) where Dog : Mammal
    {
            return query.Include("Tail");
    }

    public static IQueryable<Bat> IncludeExtraEntities<Bat>(this IQueryable<Bat> query) where Bat: Mammal
    {
            return query.Include("Wing");
    }
}

Then, you can simply call:

myContext.Dogs.IncludeExtraEntities();

And the method depending on your type will be called.

2
  • Thanks, but is not that what I want. What I need is to call Mammals.IncludeForDog().IncludeForBat().IncludeForBuffalo()... Dec 1 '15 at 17:24
  • So I will hava a list of mamals of dogs, bats and buffalos, and for each one its respectives properties correctly loaded. Dec 1 '15 at 17:25
0

You're expecting too much from Include. The lambda expression you enter in Include is merely a string provider that looks far too intelligent. Under the hood its member expression is dissected to get the name of the property, that's all. The name is entered into the Include method that accepts a string parameter. That method does the actual work.

The lambda expression has to point to a navigation property on the type in the IQueryable. You can't do ...

myContext.Mammals.Include(d => d.Tail)

... because Tail is not a property of the base type. You can only do ...

myContext.Mammals.OfType<Dog>().Include(d => d.Tail)

The best you can get is something like

from m in context.Mammals
let tail = (m as Dog).Tail
let wing = (m as Bat).Wing
let horns= (m as Buffalo).Horns
select new { Mammal = m, tail, wing, horns }

Since everything is translated into SQL you don't have to worry about null reference exceptions.

0

i faced problem like that and here how i solved it:

 public IEnumerable<OrderLine> GetAllOrderLinesData()
    {
        var _StockOrderLines = appContext.OrderLines.OfType<StockOrderLine>()
            .Include(p => p.Order).Include(p => p.Product);

        var _AnnualOrderLines = appContext.OrderLines.OfType<AnnualOrderLine>()
            .Include(p => p.Order).Include(p => p.Customer);

        return _StockOrderLines.ToList<OrderLine>().Union<OrderLine>(_AnnualOrderLines.ToList<OrderLine>());
    }

you can change classes as yours :)

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