10

I am performing the 2D FFT on a particular image and I get its spectral components. Now this image has been superimposed with another image to create periodic noise.

The original image as well as the periodic noise version is shown below:

Original Image

enter image description here

Periodic Noise Image

enter image description here

To filter this out, I used manual boxes that masked the components in the magnitude spectrum that are quite large relative to the other components as shown below.

enter image description here

After this is done, I perform an inverse FFT, but I do not get the original image back.

enter image description here

Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong?

Here is the code that masks the values and then proceeds to do an inverse 2D FFT on the masked spectral image:

pat1 = imread('Pattern1.png');

spec_orig = fft2(double(pat1));     
spec_orig2 = abs(spec_orig); 
spec_img = fftshift(spec_orig2);

for j = 115:125
    for n = 96:106
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 216:226
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 274:284
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 298:308
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 12:22
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 37:47
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
end

%Getting Back the Image for Pattern1
figure;subplot(2,1,1);
spec_img = log(1 + spec_img);
imshow(spec_img,[]); 

subplot(2,1,2);
ptnfx = ifft2(spec_img);
imshow(ptnfx);
12
  • 1
    That double for loop at the beginning can be removed by making use of array indexing: spec_img([96:106 216:226],115:125)=0 etc. – Andras Deak Dec 1 '15 at 18:53
  • 1
    @AndrasDeak Wasn't aware that you could do that - thank you! – SDG Dec 1 '15 at 18:59
  • No problem. This is why I suggested getting familiar with matlab itself:) Having a firm grasp on the essentials of the language can make your life much easier, and your code much more elegant and efficient. – Andras Deak Dec 1 '15 at 19:01
  • 1
    Did you ask questions in the MATLAB Central forum where they said it was too broad or here? This question is certainly not too broad. You showed us what you tried and where you got stuck. This is highly appropriate for StackOverflow. – rayryeng Dec 1 '15 at 20:17
  • 1
    BTW, you can certainly continue to ask image processing questions :D. I'm the only one of two people who have the gold badge in that tag so it's a testament to how much I like the area. – rayryeng Dec 1 '15 at 20:19
23

Filtering in the frequency domain is a tricky business to get right. Your code has a few errors that are preventing you from reconstructing the original image:

  1. You are applying the filtering on the magnitude component only. You have to do this on the original image spectrum, not just the magnitude component. The phase is essential for proper reconstruction. BTW, to coin a signal processing term, what you are implementing is a notch filter or a band-stop filter, which removes certain select frequencies.

  2. You centered the spectrum via fftshift but after you filtered you forgot to undo the shift. You must invoke ifftshift on your resulting filtered image to undo the centering.

  3. You're finding the inverse FFT of the log-transformed image. Remember that performing a log transform of the spectrum is only for display purposes. You do not use this when filtering or finding the inverse. Doing this will give you unintended consequences as the majority of the spectrum has been changed due to a non-linear operation. You have to do it on the original image spectrum itself.

  4. A minor note, but make sure you call real after you filter the result after you take the inverse FFT. There are most likely some residual imaginary components that are due to computational floating-point errors and so calling real will only extract the real components of the signal.

With these corrections, this is the code I have. I've read your image directly from StackOverflow to be reproducible:

pat1 = imread('http://i.stack.imgur.com/oIumJ.png');

%// Change
spec_orig = fft2(double(pat1)); 
spec_img = fftshift(spec_orig);

for j = 115:125
    for n = 96:106
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 216:226
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 274:284
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 298:308
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 12:22
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
    for n = 37:47
        spec_img(n,j) = 0; 
    end
end

%// Change
ptnfx = real(ifft2(ifftshift(spec_img)));
imshow(ptnfx,[]);

I get this image:

enter image description here

A pretty good reconstruction of the original image I'll add. You'll still see a bit of streaking and that is highly dependent on the notch filter shape and size. Perhaps make the size bigger and even more so, make the shape of the notch filter circular instead of square. This has a tendency to preserve more of the original image as hard edges introduced by the corners of the squares have unintended ringing effects.

13
  • that was a rather silly error. My updated result is now poted on the question. Does this pertain to the same question? If not I'm happy to accept this as the answer. – SDG Dec 1 '15 at 19:02
  • 1
    @SharanDuggirala take a look at my comment above. I'd be happy to help you debug this problem, but I need to know more about how you got that transform - where's the original image? Where's the code you used to transform your image? – rayryeng Dec 1 '15 at 19:03
  • Can you upload the original image?... not it being subplotted into a figure. – rayryeng Dec 1 '15 at 19:14
  • @SharanDuggirala Yes I do please. I'd like to be able to reconstruct your problem and solve it. – rayryeng Dec 1 '15 at 19:17
  • 1
    just tried a circular notch filter and I can confirm that the image is a lot less streaky! – SDG Dec 2 '15 at 8:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.