3

I got confused about the alter.

I have an existing table, register and I want to add a this_date column with default value of current date. is it possible by alter? well it has already have data.

1
  • Yes it's possible to add a column with Alter Table. What is the problem you are having?
    – gview
    Dec 2, 2015 at 1:46

5 Answers 5

4

It should be okay.

ALTER TABLE TableName ADD COLUMN this_date DATE DEFAULT CURRENT_DATE;

As long as the new column is nullable and/or has a default value, there shouldn't be a problem.

1

You can also choose where to put the column, use the keyword after:

ALTER TABLE MyTable ADD `MyColumn` DATETIME AFTER `LastColumn`
1

This wasn't possible for me on MySQL 5.7. It gives me an error every time.
I can do it with a DATETIME field and NOW() as default, but not with CURRENT_DATE.

1
ALTER TABLE "TableName" ADD "New_Column_Name" TIMESTAMP DEFAULT now();
0

On MySQL 5.7, I didn't find a way to use CURRENT_DATE or its synonyms as default.

If your application will always provide values in INSERT statements and you only need a way to add a non-null column to existing data and then set values for existing row, you can work around this by providing a fixed default for the non-null date column

ALTER TABLE MyTable ADD COLUMN MyColumn DATE DEFAULT '2020-01-01'

and then update it to CURRENT_DATE

UPDATE MyTable SET MyColumn = CURRENT_DATE 
2
  • Welcome to SO. The idea of the default value is to be applied when the row is created; when is of course definitively relevant for CURRENT_DATE! Your UPDATE solution would be OK if it is applied e.g. in a trigger applied at row creation time. So if you can improve it in that way, it could become much more useful.
    – AntoineL
    Feb 18, 2020 at 9:35
  • AntoineL, you are of course right. I made assumptions that work for me, but not elsewhere. I'll update my answer...
    – Frank
    Feb 18, 2020 at 14:09

Your Answer

Reminder: Answers generated by Artificial Intelligence tools are not allowed on Stack Overflow. Learn more

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge that you have read and understand our privacy policy and code of conduct.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.