46

I was wondering when it is better to choose sequence, and when it is better to use serial.

What I want is returning last value after insert using

SELECT LASTVAL();

I read this question PostgreSQL Autoincrement

I never use serial before.

2
  • If you want its serial or sequence assigned to what you just inserted, it's better to use the RETURNING statement. See stackoverflow.com/questions/19167349/… Commented Dec 2, 2015 at 4:04
  • 1
    A serial uses a sequence in the background. There is essentially no difference. Using lastval() right after your insert is just fine in both cases.
    – user330315
    Commented Dec 2, 2015 at 22:01

2 Answers 2

48

Check out a nice answer about Sequence vs. Serial.

Sequence will just create sequence of unique numbers. It's not a datatype. It is a sequence. For example:

create sequence testing1;
select nextval('testing1');  -- 1
select nextval('testing1');  -- 2

You can use the same sequence in multiple places like this:

create sequence testing1;
create table table1(id int not null default nextval('testing1'), firstname varchar(20));
create table table2(id int not null default nextval('testing1'), firstname varchar(20));

insert into table1 (firstname) values ('tom'), ('henry');
insert into table2 (firstname) values ('tom'), ('henry');

select * from table1;

| id | firstname |
|----|-----------|
|  1 |       tom |
|  2 |     henry |

select * from table2;

| id | firstname |
|----|-----------|
|  3 |       tom |
|  4 |     henry |

Serial is a pseudo datatype. It will create a sequence object. Let's take a look at a straight-forward table (similar to the one you will see in the link).

create table test(field1 serial);

This will cause a sequence to be created along with the table. The sequence name's nomenclature is <tablename>_<fieldname>_seq. The above one is the equivalent of:

create sequence test_field1_seq;
create table test(field1 int not null default nextval('test_field1_seq'));

Also see: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.3/static/datatype-numeric.html

You can reuse the sequence that is auto-created by serial datatype, or you may choose to just use one serial/sequence per table.

create table table3(id serial, firstname varchar(20));
create table table4(id int not null default nextval('table3_id_seq'), firstname varchar(20));

(The risk here is that if table3 is dropped and we continue using table3's sequence, we will get an error)

create table table5(id serial, firstname varchar(20));    
insert into table3 (firstname) values ('tom'), ('henry');
insert into table4 (firstname) values ('tom'), ('henry');
insert into table5 (firstname) values ('tom'), ('henry');

select * from table3;
| id | firstname |
|----|-----------|
|  1 |       tom |
|  2 |     henry |
        
select * from table4; -- this uses sequence created in table3
| id | firstname |
|----|-----------|
|  3 |       tom |
|  4 |     henry |
        
select * from table5;
| id | firstname |
|----|-----------|
|  1 |       tom |
|  2 |     henry |    

Feel free to try out an example: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!15/074ac/1

1
  • 9
    Yes, but serial is not an actual data type, it's a pseudo data type - which is an important distinction to make: stackoverflow.com/a/27309311/939860 or stackoverflow.com/a/14651788/939860 And it only makes sense to share a sequence in special situations, and you would use a free-standing sequence in such a case, not one that is OWNED by a serial column - thus avoiding the caveats you mention at the bottom of your answer. Commented Dec 2, 2015 at 6:09
13

2021 answer using identity

I was wondering when it is better to choose sequence, and when it is better to use serial.

Not an answer to the whole question (only the part quoted above), still I guess it could help further readers. You should not use sequence nor serial, you should rather prefer identity columns:

create table apps (
    id integer primary key generated always as identity
);

See this detailed answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/55300741/978690 (and also https://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Don%27t_Do_This#Don.27t_use_serial)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.