20

Currently working on a Library simulator assignment. Everything is working fine, but I would like to know something just for the sake of knowing it.

In this program there are 3 classes: Book, Patron, and Library. The library class contains 3 private data members: a vector of pointers to books, a vector to pointers of patron's, and a currentDate int.

The function in question is below:

void Library::incrementCurrentDate()
{
  currentDate++;

  for (int i = 0; i < members.size(); i++)
  {
    vector<Book*> ptr = members.at(i)->getCheckedOutBooks();

     for (int j = 0; j < ptr.size(); j++)
      {
        if (currentDate > ptr.at(j)->getCheckOutLength())
            members.at(i)->amendFine(.10);
      }
  }
} 

the requirements for the function are this:

increment current date; increase each Patron's fines by 10 cents for each overdue Book they have checked out (using amendFine)

The way I have written it above works fine now. As I am just in my first semester of my computer science program, we cannot use anything that we have not covered, which I know is alot. With that being said, would there be a more efficient way to implement this function using more advanced c++ programming methods?

  • 5
    keep the books sorted by due date, so you don't check every book – Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 2 '15 at 4:34
  • 4
    @NickD const std::vector<Book*>& ptr – Weak to Enuma Elish Dec 2 '15 at 4:36
  • 5
    use [] instead of at since you are already range checking – Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 2 '15 at 4:37
  • 4
    Counting the number of overdue books and adjusting the fine once at the end might be faster than calling the function every time. – Weak to Enuma Elish Dec 2 '15 at 4:46
  • 9
    Everything is working fine - plug for Code Review – MikeTheLiar Dec 2 '15 at 14:15
17
  1. Use std::vector if the size is not extremely large.

Pointers always have a cost associated with them because of the indirection involved. Looking up an address and accessing it in memory may not be able to be optimized by the compiler out and will thus involve costs with accessing memory. Memory access is often the bottleneck for performance in systems, so it's best to try to put things near to each other in memory and try to structure your programs so that you access memory the least.

  1. Use a database system, like SQL, if the data gets extremely large.

On the other hand, we can forego all of the dirty work and use an established database library or program. Something like MySQL can easily manage a lot of data with a great programming language to access and manage it as well. Certain databases, like PostgreSQL can scale to large sets of data. Getting familiar with it can also be quite helpful. Even some mobile apps might use MySQL for Android, for example.

  1. Use the modern C++11 or greater for loop iteration syntax.

The current for loop syntax is quite opaque and might have a lot of cruft. C++11 introduced a cleaner for loop syntax to iterate across standard library containers like map or vector. Use: for(auto it : vector_name). If you need to modify each one, use a reference qualifier for the it--the iterator.

  1. Use pre-increment syntax for possibly minimal speedup.

++i and i++ are slightly different. ++i just directly modifies the object where it appears in an expression before it continues evaluating it. i++ creates a copy of the object, returns it, and increments the original. Creating a copy of a value or object has a cost in C++, so avoiding this can be helpful in certain cases and it is a good convention to do this anyways.

  1. Pass by const &. Not by just regular reference.

Function arguments are passed by value by default in C++. This means that C++ just makes a copy of the object. However, when there are mutations applied repeatedly to an object, like, say, using a function to change the value of an integer over time, you may want to pass by reference. References basically pass the "real" object, meaning that any changes you make to the reference are done on the "real" object.

Now, why pass a non-modifiable object? Because it can lead to better optimizations. Passing by constant reference allows the compiler to make stronger assumptions about your code (e.g. because the reference cannot change within the course of the program, referring to the same reference multiple times in the function doesn't require the value of the argument to be reloaded over again because it shouldn't change while inside of a function).

  1. Use a std::unique_ptr or std::shared_ptr.

Smart pointers are also a nice feature that was introduced with C++11, and involves pointers that automatically deallocate themselves by attaching their lifetime to scope. In other words, no need to use new or delete--just create the pointers and you shouldn't have to keep track of when to release memory. This can get complicated in certain situations but in general, using smart pointers leads to better safety and less change of having memory management problems, which is why they were inducted into the standard library in the first place.

  • 6
    4 is a moot point. Compilers will optimize pre- and post-increment and decrement in a for-loop. – erip Dec 2 '15 at 4:52
  • 1
    item 7: yes, whitespace makes programs slower, but not as slow as those pesky comments – Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 2 '15 at 4:54
  • 2
    @GlennTeitelbaum Yeah I just removed that. It's more pointless than pointless cruft. – VermillionAzure Dec 2 '15 at 4:58
  • 1
    smart pointers do not make code run faster, just safer and easier to maintain – Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 2 '15 at 5:02
  • 2
    @erip I put it because it's a good rule-of-thumb to follow. Having to deal with an expression that has an i++ that creates strange behavior can be hard to find because you think that it's just i+1 when it's really just i and then i+1. I know I've tripped over it before so I put it there. – VermillionAzure Dec 2 '15 at 5:18
5

There are a couple of questions to answer here I think. The first being: can this algorithm be more efficient? And the other being: can my implementation of the algorithm in c++ be more efficient?

To the first question, I would answer no. Based on the problem, it sounds to me like you have no further information that would allow you to do any better than O(n^2).

As mentioned in the comments, you could iterate over every person and sort their books by due date. In practice this could save some time, but in theory book lookup would still be linear time, O(n). Plus you add the overhead of sorting making your algorithm now O(mnlog(n)) where m is the number of patrons and n is the number of books. If you know you have few patrons with many books each, then sorting could be beneficial. If you have many patrons with few books, it would be much less beneficial.

As for the second question: there are a few small tweaks (and a few large tweaks) that could make your code more efficient, although I would argue that a vast majority of the time they would not be necessary. One major thing I notice is that you recreate a vector object on every iteration of you first for loop. By doing this you are creating unnecessary overhead. Try instead this pseudo-code:

currentDate++;
vector<Book*> ptr = members.at(i)->getCheckedOutBooks();
for(....)

Another optimization that could be a large overhaul would be to drop the Vector library. A vector in c++ has the ability to be resized on the fly as well as other unnecessary overhead (for your task). Simply using an array would be more memory efficient, although equivalently time efficient.

You mentioned being in your first semester, so you probably have not been introduced to Big O notation yet.

  • are you sure of your O () usage? – Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 2 '15 at 4:50
  • 1
    correct, we have not been introduced to Big O notation yet, but thank you for the link! I just want to start absorbing everything that I can whenever I have some downtime – user5605077 Dec 2 '15 at 4:53
  • @GlennTeitelbaum Relatively sure (though open for discussion). I suppose it could be more correct to say the original algorithm is O(mn) where m is number of patrons and n is number of books. Lookup in a sorted list is same as lookup in unsorted (linear) because worst case scenario every book is overdue, so we iterate over all of them. Sorting is well known to be O(nlog(n)) at best. So yes, I stand by my Big O usage. – Andnp Dec 2 '15 at 5:01
  • You will find N books regardless of the number of patrons – Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 2 '15 at 14:22
  • Ah I see your point, I should have been more clear. It is O(mn) where m is the number of patrons, and n is the number of books per patron. – Andnp Dec 2 '15 at 14:52
5

if that is the only operation you are optimizing then keep a vector of tuple <int, Book *, Patron * > sorted by the int representing due date of evey checked out Book Then just iterate until the due date is greater than the current date appying fines the the associated Patron.

  • interesting, we haven't covered that yet but i'll definitely play around with it, thanks! – user5605077 Dec 2 '15 at 4:57
  • Have you considered that you probably also want to remove books from that list when the members check them in? Removing from such a list would be expensive since you don't remove from the end. – HelloGoodbye Dec 2 '15 at 13:18
  • @hellogoodbye optimization is often a tradeoff between operations. if applying fines (generally a batch operation with a large N) is the most critical, then as posted by OP this would be my solution. adding and removing books is limited by most libraries to a small N, so performance may not be as critical. when balancing operations, a linked list with side indexes might be optimal overall, but that wasn't the question – Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 2 '15 at 13:43
  • @HelloGoodbye yes actually, there is a function in the library class that will remove a book from a patrons checkedoutbooks list when they return it – user5605077 Dec 3 '15 at 4:34
  • @GlennTeitelbaum What do you mean by "balancing operations"? – HelloGoodbye Dec 3 '15 at 14:40
4

If you have n checked out books, m of which are overdue, your algorithm takes O(n) time to add the fines. This is because your data structure stores information like this

member -> list(checked out books)
book -> check-out length // presumably the due date for returning the book

If in addition to your members collection you also store the following information:

check-out length -> list(checked out books with that due date)
book -> member who checked it out

then you can use a sorted tree that stores all checked-out books by their due date to look up all overdue books in O(log n). Thus the total asymptotic run-time of your algorithm would reduce from O(n) to O(log n + m).

  • I was on the same track as you. What container type would you use to store all lists of checked out books with a certain due date? Because such a list would depend on the due date so you would need to have many different lists of that type. – HelloGoodbye Dec 2 '15 at 13:14
  • That's right, but the number of lists would be <= n. I would suggest using a std::set to store the a struct consisting of the due date and the list of all books that are due on that date. Then you need to provide a < operator for these structs; here you would simply compare the due dates. Finally, you can use std::set::upper_bound to retrieve all books that are due before a certain date. – Thomas Dec 2 '15 at 13:49
  • Note that std::set is typically implemented using a binary search tree, according to cplusplus.com/reference/set/set . – Thomas Dec 2 '15 at 13:58
3

You might consider replacing the vector with an std::map container. Maps are stored as sorted trees. If you define a comparator function comparing checkout length (or more likely "expired date") you do not need to scan the entire list every time.

A more complicated solution would store all books in a single tree of pointers sorted by their expiration time. Then you wouldn't have to iterate over members at all. Instead iterate over books until you find a book that has not expired yet.

This is more complicated because now adding/removing books for each member (or even iterating over all books a member owns) is more difficult and may require maintaining a vector of pointers for each user as your current approach (in addition to the global book map).

  • a sorted vector is faster to walk – Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 2 '15 at 14:20
  • @GlennTeitelbaum: but adding entries is more expensive. So assuming users borrow and return books frequency, a tree holding all books might be better. Depends of course on the number of books involved. For small numbers vectors are more efficient due to memory efficiency and avoiding pointer chasing. – nimrodm Dec 2 '15 at 14:26
  • @nimrodm Aren't maps a form of linked lists in implementation right now? If I remember, there was a CPPCon presentation about this a little while ago. – VermillionAzure Dec 2 '15 at 19:08
  • 1
    @VermillionAzure std::map and related containers are typically implemented as balanced binary trees. The C++ standard specifies complexity requirements for some operations that couldn't be satisfied with a linked list. – Blastfurnace Dec 2 '15 at 19:21
  • @Blastfurnace I thought binary trees are often structured as linked list-like anyways. The point is that they use pointers. Is that right? – VermillionAzure Dec 2 '15 at 20:13
2

Right now you're amend fines in O(n) (n being getCheckOutLength().size()) but you can do it in O(log(n)) since you need just number of late books and not their objects for fining, if you have that number then you multiply it by .01 and use one amend fine function to do it all.

So here is the way I suggest:
If you keep getCheckedOutBooks() sorted by their getCheckOutLength() in a vector then you can find which dates are more than curDate by finding std::upper_bound in the vector that gives you the first element that is greater than the currentDate, so from that element index to the end of vector is number of book who should be fined, here is the code:

int checkedDateComparator(Patron & leftHand, Patron & rightHand){
    return leftHand.getCheckedOutLength() < rightHand.getCheckOutLength();  
}
bool operator==(Patron & a, Patron & b){
    return a.getCheckedOutLength() < b.getCheckOutLength();
}
void Library::incrementCurrentDate()
{
    currentDate++;

    for (int i = 0; i < members.size(); i++)
    {
        vector<Book*> ptr = members.at(i)->getCheckedOutBooks();
        Book dummy; //dummy used for find the fines 
        dummy.setCheckedOutLength(currentDate);
        int overdue = ptr.end() - upper_bound(ptr.begin(), ptr.end(), dummmy, checkedDateComparator);
        members.at(i)->amendFine(overdue* .01);
   }
} 
2

It's been a while since I've used C++, but almost always the standard libraries will be faster than your own implementation. For your reference, check out the standard functions that are associated with std::vector (this site is extremely useful).

You might be able to slim down the ptr.size() through some other filtering logic so you don't have to iterate over people who don't have late books (maybe some sorting on books and their due dates?)

  • 1
    that does make a lot of sense, thanks for that input – user5605077 Dec 2 '15 at 4:44
1

Let's take a step back and look at the requirements. When you go to the library and have some possibly-late checked-out books, you probably ask the librarian what you owe. The librarian looks up your account and tells you. It is at that point that you should be calculating the fees. What you're doing now is recalculating the fees every midnight (I'm assuming). That's the part that's inefficient.

Let's instead have this use-case:

  1. Librarian attempts to check out a patron's books
  2. System calculates fees
  3. Patron pays any outstanding fees
  4. Librarian checks out the books

The relevant part for your question would be step #2. Here's pseudocode:

float CalculateFees(Patron patron)
{
    float result = 0;
    foreach(checkedOutBook in patron.GetCheckedOutBooks())
    {
        result += CalculateFee(checkedOutBook.CheckOutDate(), today);
    }
    return result;
}

float CalculateFee(Date checkOutDate, Date today)
{
    return (today.Day() - checkOutDate.Day()) * 0.10;
}

The whole use-case could be as simple as:

void AttemptCheckout(Patron patron, BookList books)
{
    float fees = CalculateFees(patron);
    if(fees == 0 || (fees > 0 && PatronPaysFees(patron, fees)))
    {
        Checkout(patron, books);
    }
    else
    {
        RejectCheckout(patron);
    }
}

I've written this in a way that makes it easy to change the fee formula. Some types of materials accrue fines differently than other types of materials. Fines may be capped at a certain amount.

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