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Is there an inbuilt function to convert C++ string from upper case letters to lowercase letters ? If not converting it to cstring and using tolower on each char is the only option ?

Thank you very much in advance.

8
  • 4
    In Germany, tolower("STRASSE") should result in "straße". In Swiss, it should be "strasse". And there are many more cases like this around the world. An inbuilt function must correctly handle those cases. If you don't care, just use tolower() on each character as most answers show.
    – Sjoerd
    Aug 4 '10 at 8:56
  • @Sjoerd: Nice example. Have you heard of any library that deals with those cases gracefully ? I could be interested in it.
    – ereOn
    Aug 4 '10 at 9:07
  • @ereOn: No, I never needed one. I know there are problems with tolower() but where I live and in the applications I write, tolower() usually is "good enough".
    – Sjoerd
    Aug 4 '10 at 9:23
  • I'd imagine ICU can handle it correctly (icu-project.org), but it might be overkill for the OP's purposes.
    – jalf
    Aug 4 '10 at 10:51
  • @ereOn: it is actually near impossible without a dictionary that contains all ambiguous words. In german, SS is only ß if spoken slowly, otherwise it should become ss. Jun 16 '11 at 10:48
30

If boost is an option:

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>    

std::string str = "wHatEver";
boost::to_lower(str);

Otherwise, you may use std::transform:

std::string str = "wHatEver";
std::transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), ::tolower);

You can also use another function if you have some custom locale-aware tolower.

0
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std::transform(myString.begin(), myString.end(), myString.begin(), std::tolower);
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  • 7
    This and other transform + tolower answers should take into account that this won't necessarily compile, depending on what standard headers are included in this file. There is one tolower in <cctype> and an overload in <locale>. If both get included, you'll get a compiler error. See for example: stackoverflow.com/questions/1350380/…
    – UncleBens
    Aug 4 '10 at 15:40
  • 1
    Note that this answer (and all of the other transform answers) potentially cause undefined behaviour, because cstdlib's std::tolower requires a non-negative argument
    – M.M
    Aug 16 '15 at 15:18
1

Like ereOn says: std::transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), std::tolower );

Or via for_each: std::for_each(str.begin(), str.end(), std::tolower );

Transform is probably better of the two.

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  • 3
    I bet so. for_each does not change str. Aug 4 '10 at 8:49
  • It was written off the cuff. You could use a lamda to call tolower for each character. Aug 4 '10 at 9:03
0

There is no built-in function to do this, and doing it is surprisingly complicated, because of locales et al. If tolower does what you need, it may be your best bet.

0

For this problem you can use the STL's transform method to solve it:

std::string str = "simple";
std::transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), std::tolower);
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I have an implementation I found it faster than std::transform , Compiled in g++ -03 Fedora 18. my example converts std::string

performance time in seconds :
transform took         : 11 s
my implementation took : 2 s
Test data size = 26*15*9999999 chars
inline void tolowerPtr(char *p) ;

inline void tolowerStr(std::string& s)
{char* c=const_cast<char*>(s.c_str());
size_t l = s.size();
  for(char* c2=c;c2<c+l;c2++)tolowerPtr(c2); 
};

inline void tolowerPtr(char *p) 
{
switch(*p)
{
  case 'A':*p='a'; return;
  case 'B':*p='b'; return;
  case 'C':*p='c'; return;
  case 'D':*p='d'; return;
  case 'E':*p='e'; return;
  case 'F':*p='f'; return;
  case 'G':*p='g'; return;
  case 'H':*p='h'; return;
  case 'I':*p='i'; return;
  case 'J':*p='j'; return;
  case 'K':*p='k'; return;
  case 'L':*p='l'; return;
  case 'M':*p='m'; return;
  case 'N':*p='n'; return;
  case 'O':*p='o'; return;
  case 'P':*p='p'; return;
  case 'Q':*p='q'; return;
  case 'R':*p='r'; return;
  case 'S':*p='s'; return;
  case 'T':*p='t'; return;
  case 'U':*p='u'; return;
  case 'V':*p='v'; return;
  case 'W':*p='w'; return;
  case 'X':*p='x'; return;
  case 'Y':*p='y'; return;
  case 'Z':*p='z'; return;
};
return ;
}

void testtransform( std::string& word )
{
std::string word2=word; 
time_t t;
time_t t2;
time(&t);
std::cout << "testtransform: start " << "\n";
int i=0;
for(;i<9999999;i++) 
{    word2=word;
    std::transform(word2.begin(), word2.end(), word2.begin(), ::tolower);
}
time(&t2);
std::cout << word2 << "\n";
std::cout << "testtransform: end " << i << ":"<< t2-t << "\n";
}

void testmytolower( std::string& word )
{
std::string word2=word; 
time_t t;
time_t t2;
time(&t);
std::cout << "testmytolower: start " << "\n";
int i=0;
for(;i<9999999;i++)
{   word2=word;
    cstralgo::tolowerStr(word2);
}
time(&t2);
std::cout << word2 << "\n";
std::cout << "testmytolower: end " << i << ":"<< t2-t << "\n";
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
   std::string word ="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
   word =word+word+word+word+word+word+word+word+word+word+word+word+word+word+word;
   testtransform( word);
   testmytolower( word);
   return 0;
}

I will be glad to know if performance can be improved further.

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    You are just covering ASCII alphabet here, and in a quite horrible way. The same can be achieved by: if (*p >= 'A' && *p <=Z) *p += 'a' - 'A'. And you are still potentially missing many other letters e.g. 'Á'.
    – gatopeich
    Apr 13 '18 at 13:34

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