3

I want to modify a string. My regex should modify the number

12365478965412365

by putting , in the sets of 3. By converting the number into sets of 3 so the output looks like

12,365,478,965,412,365

We can use look-ahead and look-behind to achieve this

s/(?<=\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+\b)/\,/g

But when I remove \b

s/(?<=\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+)/\,/g

I get output as

1,2,3,6,5,4,7,8,9,6,5,4,1,2,365.

How does \b affect the position of look behind to apply ","?

Does regex go till end of word boundary before look behind is tested?

  • \b affects the lookahead, not the lookbehind here. The whole match is impacted when you remove \b. – Wiktor Stribiżew Dec 2 '15 at 9:53
  • can you please explain how the look-ahead while moving from left to the right of the string gets impacted due to \b? – Ullas Dec 2 '15 at 9:56
  • 3
    You really can see that for yourself at regex101.com at the regex debugger page. Some people get crazy amount of points for answering such questions by pasting screenshots from that page, but I'd urge you to just go there and check the backtracking steps. – Wiktor Stribiżew Dec 2 '15 at 9:58
  • sure..that would also help me in understanding...thanks :) – Ullas Dec 2 '15 at 9:59
  • 1
    The thing that's not clear here is that \b is actually acting as if it's $. It's acting as an anchor to the right hand side of the pattern. Your pattern has to read that far, then backtrack so it can then match (\d\d\d)+ from the right. Without that, your pattern isn't anchored and so matches any 4 digit substring - but because it isn't consuming, it'll match every digit apart from the last 3. (Which is what's happening) – Sobrique Dec 2 '15 at 10:17
4

What \b does is match the boundary between words. It's otherwise zero width. From perlre:

A word boundary (\b) is a spot between two characters that has a \w on one side of it and a \W on the other side of it (in either order), counting the imaginary characters off the beginning and end of the string as matching a \W .

The problem with what you're trying to do, is that the positioning of the comma is a right-to-left operation - you don't know if it should be 10,000 or 100,000 until you've seen the total number of digits in the string.

So I would suggest that this is far easier if you don't do a 'straight' regex and lookaheads, and instead do it with reverse:

my $str =  '12365478965412365';    
my $comma_sep_str = reverse ( reverse ($str) =~ s/(\d{3})/$1,/rg );
print $comma_sep_str;

Reverse it, group in 3s from left to right, and then reverse it again.

If you're having problem with what a regex is doing though, the normal trick is turn on use re 'debug';.

I won't reproduce the output, because it's long. But what is happening is that the pattern is using the \b to anchor on the end of line.

You can see this a bit more clearly if you take away the g flag:

Compiling REx "(?<=\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+\b)"
Final program:
   1: IFMATCH[-1] (6)
   3:   POSIXU[\d] (4)
   4:   SUCCEED (0)
   5: TAIL (6)
   6: IFMATCH[0] (22)
   8:   CURLYM[1] {1,32767} (19)
  12:     POSIXU[\d] (13)
  13:     POSIXU[\d] (14)
  14:     POSIXU[\d] (17)
  17:     SUCCEED (0)
  18:   NOTHING (19)
  19:   BOUND (20)
  20:   SUCCEED (0)
  21: TAIL (22)
  22: END (0)
minlen 0 
Matching REx "(?<=\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+\b)" against "12365478965412365"
   0 <> <1236547896>         |  1:IFMATCH[-1](6)
                                  failed...
   1 <1> <2365478965>        |  1:IFMATCH[-1](6)
   0 <> <1236547896>         |  3:  POSIXU[\d](4)
   1 <1> <2365478965>        |  4:  SUCCEED(0)
                                    subpattern success...
   1 <1> <2365478965>        |  6:IFMATCH[0](22)
   1 <1> <2365478965>        |  8:  CURLYM[1] {1,32767}(19)
   1 <1> <2365478965>        | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
   2 <12> <3654789654>       | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
   3 <123> <6547896541>      | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
   4 <1236> <5478965412>     | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 1 times, len=3...
   4 <1236> <5478965412>     | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
   5 <12365> <4789654123>    | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
   6 <23654> <7896541236>    | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
   7 <36547> <8965412365>    | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 2 times, len=3...
   7 <36547> <8965412365>    | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
   8 <65478> <965412365>     | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
   9 <54789> <65412365>      | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
  10 <47896> <5412365>       | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 3 times, len=3...
  10 <47896> <5412365>       | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
  11 <478965> <412365>       | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
  12 <4789654> <12365>       | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
  13 <47896541> <2365>       | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 4 times, len=3...
  13 <47896541> <2365>       | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
  14 <478965412> <365>       | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
  15 <4789654123> <65>       | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
  16 <47896541236> <5>       | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 5 times, len=3...
  16 <47896541236> <5>       | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
  17 <478965412365> <>       | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
                                      failed...
                                    CURLYM trying tail with matches=5...
  16 <47896541236> <5>       | 19:    BOUND(20)
                                      failed...
                                    CURLYM trying tail with matches=4...
  13 <47896541> <2365>       | 19:    BOUND(20)
                                      failed...
                                    CURLYM trying tail with matches=3...
  10 <47896> <5412365>       | 19:    BOUND(20)
                                      failed...
                                    CURLYM trying tail with matches=2...
   7 <36547> <8965412365>    | 19:    BOUND(20)
                                      failed...
                                    CURLYM trying tail with matches=1...
   4 <1236> <5478965412>     | 19:    BOUND(20)
                                      failed...
                                    failed...
                                  failed...
   2 <12> <3654789654>       |  1:IFMATCH[-1](6)
   1 <1> <2365478965>        |  3:  POSIXU[\d](4)
   2 <12> <3654789654>       |  4:  SUCCEED(0)
                                    subpattern success...
   2 <12> <3654789654>       |  6:IFMATCH[0](22)
   2 <12> <3654789654>       |  8:  CURLYM[1] {1,32767}(19)
   2 <12> <3654789654>       | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
   3 <123> <6547896541>      | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
   4 <1236> <5478965412>     | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
   5 <12365> <4789654123>    | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 1 times, len=3...
   5 <12365> <4789654123>    | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
   6 <23654> <7896541236>    | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
   7 <36547> <8965412365>    | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
   8 <65478> <965412365>     | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 2 times, len=3...
   8 <65478> <965412365>     | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
   9 <54789> <65412365>      | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
  10 <47896> <5412365>       | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
  11 <478965> <412365>       | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 3 times, len=3...
  11 <478965> <412365>       | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
  12 <4789654> <12365>       | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
  13 <47896541> <2365>       | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
  14 <478965412> <365>       | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 4 times, len=3...
  14 <478965412> <365>       | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
  15 <4789654123> <65>       | 13:    POSIXU[\d](14)
  16 <47896541236> <5>       | 14:    POSIXU[\d](17)
  17 <478965412365> <>       | 17:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
                                    CURLYM now matched 5 times, len=3...
  17 <478965412365> <>       | 12:    POSIXU[\d](13)
                                      failed...
                                    CURLYM trying tail with matches=5...
  17 <478965412365> <>       | 19:    BOUND(20)
  17 <478965412365> <>       | 20:    SUCCEED(0)
                                      subpattern success...
   2 <12> <3654789654>       | 22:END(0)
Match successful!
Freeing REx: "(?<=\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+\b)"

12,365478965412365

Because of the lookaround assertions being made, there's a lot of steps in this one iteration of the regex, because what it's matching first is:

 (\d\d\d)+\b

1 or more instances of 3 or more digits anchored by a 'boundary'. But there aren't any, so it's using just the end of line.

The thing that's not clear here is that \b is actually acting as if it's $. It's acting as an anchor to the right hand side of the pattern. Your pattern has to read that far, then backtrack so it can then match (\d\d\d)+ from the right. Without that, your pattern isn't anchored and so matches any 4 digit substring - but because it isn't consuming, it'll match every digit apart from the last 3. (Which is what's happening)

Your pattern works the same if you use $. Hopefully this makes it clearer what's going on?

my $str =  '12365478965412365';    
$str =~ s/(?<=\d)(?=(\d\d\d)+$)/\,/g;    
print $str;
  • yes..that would greatly simplify the task..thanks a lot for the approach. – Ullas Dec 2 '15 at 9:58
  • 1
    thanks a lot for detailed explanation – Ullas Dec 2 '15 at 12:28

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