4

In the following HTML

<nav>
  <a href="home.html">home</a>
  <a href="about.html">about</a>
  <a href="more.html">more</a>
  <a href="contact.html">contact</a>
</nav>

one should reverse the <a>.

JavaScript

Create a reverse array:

var n = document.querySelector("nav");
var max = n.children.length;
var arrReverse = [];

for (i = (max - 1); i > -1; i -= 1) {
  arrReverse.push(n.children[i]);
}

I thought that this would work:

for(j = 0; j < max; j += 1) {
  n.children[j].innerHTML = arrReverse[j].innerHTML;
  n.children[j].href = arrReverse[j].href;
}

but it didn't. The output is contact more more contact.

Can someone explain, why this does not work.

JSFiddle

  • It must be storing a reference, but the solution is eluding me, If you store the text of the children it works as expected – Liam Dec 2 '15 at 10:58
  • Side note: you might want to use var i and var j in your for loops in case i and j exist in a higher scope, otherwise you're overwriting their values. (Or even better, let i if you're working in an ES2015 environment). – James Thorpe Dec 2 '15 at 10:59
  • @Liam: I know how to debug! I wouldn't ask this question if I had figured it out. Sometimes one need a little hint to open up the eyes. Your solution is not correct. It does not assign the hrefs. – Sun Dec 2 '15 at 11:12
5

when you change n.childerns arrReverse change too

var n = document.querySelector("nav");
var max = n.children.length;
var arrReverse = [];

for(i = (max - 1); i > -1; i -= 1) {
  arrReverse.push([n.children[i].innerHTML,n.children[i].href]);
}

for(j = 0; j < max; j += 1) {
  // console.log(arrReverse[j].innerHTML);
  n.children[j].innerHTML = arrReverse[j][0];
  n.children[j].href = arrReverse[j][1];
}
  • 1
    Basically break the object reference again but without cloning everything – Liam Dec 2 '15 at 11:20
  • Thank you very much! I have mixed up arrays and objects and didn't recognize it. Nice and clear solution! – Sun Dec 2 '15 at 11:43
2

I think it's because you are storing references here (because children[i] is object):

arrReverse.push(n.children[i]);

So your arrReverse elements are references to n.children[i] and not new objects. That's why here:

n.children[j].innerHTML = arrReverse[j].innerHTML;
n.children[j].href = arrReverse[j].href;

you are getting values that you've changed in a previous loop iteration.

The right code will be:

var n = document.querySelector("nav");
var max = n.children.length;
var arrReverse = [];

for(i = (max - 1); i > -1; i -= 1) {
  arrReverse.push(clone(n.children[i]));  //here we store new objects, not references
}

for(j = 0; j < max; j += 1) {
  // console.log(arrReverse[j].innerHTML);
  n.children[j].innerHTML = arrReverse[j].innerHTML;
  n.children[j].href = arrReverse[j].href;
}

function clone(obj)
{ 
   var clone = {};
   clone.prototype = obj.prototype;
   for (property in obj) clone[property] = obj[property];
   return clone;
}

JSFiddle

  • Ah, yes, the clone breaks the object reference – Liam Dec 2 '15 at 11:18
1

You dont need to make a call to the DOM elements in loop, they are changing on each iteration here:

for (j = 0; j < max; j += 1) {
    n.children[j].innerHTML = arrReverse[j].innerHTML;
    n.children[j].href = arrReverse[j].href;
}

It is better to save the data from them, reverse it, and show it to the user.

var n = document.querySelector("nav");
var a = n.querySelectorAll("a"),
    max = a.length;
var arrReverse = [],
    menu = [],
    i, j, k = 0;

// save data
for (k = 0; k < max; k++) {
    menu[k] = {
        text: a[k].innerHTML,
        link: a[k].href
    }
}

// reverse data
for (i = (max - 1); i > -1; i -= 1) {
    arrReverse.push(menu[i]);
}

// print reversed data
for (j = 0; j < max; j += 1) {
    a[j].innerHTML = arrReverse[j].text;
    a[j].href = arrReverse[j].link;
}

Fiddle

menu = [] stores your data, then you reverse it (in a new array). In the last loop, you just get the data from it and set in the right places.

Hope you are looking for this.

0

In the arrReverse array, you are storing the elements contained in the HTMLCollection by reference, so, any change in the original HTMLCollection will change the elements in that array. On the other hand, you need to be aware that you are working with the ParentNode.children property, and it returns a live HTMLCollection. This means that any change that you make in the DOM directly will update automatically the HTMLCollection.

So, it is easy to understand what is happening:

This is a representation of the HTMLCollection returned from n.children:

0 => <a href="home.html">home</a>
1 => <a href="about.html">about</a>
2 => <a href="more.html">more</a>
3 => <a href="contact.html">contact</a>

And this is a representation of the arrReverse array:

0 => <a href="contact.html">contact</a> (reference of the HTMLCollection index 3)
1 => <a href="more.html">more</a> (reference of the HTMLCollection index 2)
2 => <a href="about.html">about</a> (reference of the HTMLCollection index 1)
3 => <a href="home.html">home</a> (reference of the HTMLCollection index 0)

When you run:

n.children[0].innerHTML = arrReverse[0].innerHTML;
n.children[0].href = arrReverse[0].href;

n.children[1].innerHTML = arrReverse[1].innerHTML;
n.children[1].href = arrReverse[1].href;

This will be the status of both objects:

HTMLCollection:

0 => <a href="contact.html">contact</a>
1 => <a href="more.html">more</a>
2 => <a href="more.html">more</a>
3 => <a href="contact.html">contact</a>

arrReverse array:

0 => <a href="contact.html">contact</a> (reference of the HTMLCollection index 3)
1 => <a href="more.html">more</a> (reference of the HTMLCollection index 2)
2 => <a href="more.html">more</a> (reference of the HTMLCollection index 1)
3 => <a href="contact.html">contact</a> (reference of the HTMLCollection index 0)

So, without continuing the loop, at this moment, both objects have lost the reference to about and home. The result will be contact more more contact.

To avoid this issue in an easy way, we can follow two approaches:

  1. Use a non-live collection, and this is possible if Element.querySelectorAll is used because it returns a static (non-live) NodeList. So, in this case, if you change the DOM directly, the NodeList will not be updated, and this means that it is not needed a secondary array to store the data, we can use the same data stored in the original collection as far as we don't modify directly the elements inside it.
  2. To modify the DOM directly (without modifying the elements inside the NodeList), Element.outerHTML could be used, because using it directly in the elements will change the DOM without changing the original elements (read the next quote located in the documentation of this attribute).

Also, while the element will be replaced in the document, the variable whose outerHTML property was set will still hold a reference to the original element.

Here you have the solution following these approaches:

var anchors = document.querySelectorAll("nav a");

anchors.forEach((a, i) => a.outerHTML = anchors[anchors.length - i - 1].outerHTML);
<nav>
  <a href="home.html">home</a>
  <a href="about.html">about</a>
  <a href="more.html">more</a>
  <a href="contact.html">contact</a>
</nav>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.