24

From the man page,

MAP_ANONYMOUS
              The mapping is not backed by any file; its contents are initialized to zero.  The fd and offset arguments are ignored; however, some implementations  require
              fd  to  be  -1  if  MAP_ANONYMOUS  (or  MAP_ANON)  is  specified, and portable applications should ensure this.  The use of MAP_ANONYMOUS in conjunction with
              MAP_SHARED is only supported on Linux since kernel 2.4.

What is the purpose of using MAP_ANONYMOUS? Any example would be good. Also From where the memory will be mapped?

It is written on man page that The use of MAP_ANONYMOUS in conjunction with MAP_SHARED is only supported on Linux since kernel 2.4. How can i share the memory mapped with MAP_ANONYMOUS with other process?

38

Anonymous mappings can be pictured as a zeroized virtual file. Anonymous mappings are simply large, zero-filled blocks of memory ready for use. These mappings reside outside of the heap, thus do not contribute to data segment fragmentation.

MAP_ANONYMOUS + MAP_PRIVATE:

  • every call creates a distinct mapping
  • children inherit parent's mappings
  • childrens' writes on the inherited mapping are catered in copy-on-write manner
  • the main purpose of using this kind of mapping is to allocate a new zeroized memory
  • malloc employs anonymous private mappings to serve memory allocation requests larger than MMAP_THRESHOLD bytes.
    typically, MMAP_THRESHOLD is 128kB.

MAP_ANONYMOUS + MAP_SHARED:

  • each call creates a distinct mapping that doesn't share pages with any other mapping
  • children inherit parent's mappings
  • no copy-on-write when someone else sharing the mapping writes on the shared mapping
  • shared anonymous mappings allow IPC in a manner similar to System V memory segments, but only between related processes

On Linux, there are two ways to create anonymous mappings:

  • specify MAP_ANONYMOUS flag and pass -1 for fd

        addr = mmap(NULL, length, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED | MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0); 
        if (addr == MAP_FAILED)
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);  
    
  • open /dev/zero and pass this opened fd

        fd = open("/dev/zero", O_RDWR);   
        addr = mmap(NULL, length, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE, fd, 0);
    

    (this method is typically used on systems like BSD, that do not have MAP_ANONYMOUS flag)

Advantages of anonymous mappings:
- no virtual address space fragmentation; after unmapping, the memory is immediately returned to the system
- they are modifiable in terms of allocation size, permissions and they can also receive advice just like normal mappings
- each allocation is a distinct mapping, separate from global heap

Disadvantages of anonymous mappings:
- size of each mapping is an integer multiple of system's page size, thus it can lead to wastage of address space
- creating and returning mappings incur more overhead than that of from the pre-allocated heap

if a program containing such mapping, forks a process, the child inherits the mapping. The following program demonstrates this kinda inheritance:

#ifdef USE_MAP_ANON
#define _BSD_SOURCE
#endif  
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    /*Pointer to shared memory region*/    
    int *addr;   

#ifdef USE_MAP_ANON      /*Use MAP_ANONYMOUS*/           
     addr = mmap(NULL, sizeof(int), PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED | MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0);     
     if (addr == MAP_FAILED) {     
         fprintf(stderr, "mmap() failed\n");     
         exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
     }      

#else        /*Map /dev/zero*/     
    int fd;    
    fd = open("/dev/zero", O_RDWR);      
    if (fd == -1) {    
        fprintf(stderr, "open() failed\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }    

    addr = mmap(NULL, sizeof(int), PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED, fd, 0);    
    if (addr == MAP_FAILED) {    
        fprintf(stderr, "mmap() failed\n");    
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);    
    }     

    if (close(fd) == -1) {          /*No longer needed*/    
        fprintf(stderr, "close() failed\n");    
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);    
    }
#endif    
    *addr = 1;      /*Initialize integer in mapped region*/    

    switch(fork()) {        /*Parent and child share mapping*/     
    case -1:    
        fprintf(stderr, "fork() failed\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);    

    case 0:         /*Child: increment shared integer and exit*/     
        printf("Child started, value = %d\n", *addr);    
        (*addr)++;    

        if (munmap(addr, sizeof(int)) == -1) {    
            fprintf(stderr, "munmap()() failed\n");    
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);    
        }     
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);     

    default:        /*Parent: wait for child to terminate*/      
        if (wait(NULL) == -1) {    
            fprintf(stderr, "wait() failed\n");    
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);      
        }     

        printf("In parent, value = %d\n", *addr);         
        if (munmap(addr, sizeof(int)) == -1) {       
            fprintf(stderr, "munmap()() failed\n");      
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);       
        }        
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

Sources:
The Linux Programming Interface
Chapter 49: Memory Mappings,
Author: Michael Kerrisk

Linux System Programming (3rd edition)
Chapter 8: Memory Management,
Author: Robert Love

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    hi @nachiketkulk, Does MAP_ANONYMOUS means contiguous virtual memory ? – ransh Apr 2 '17 at 14:45
  • 4
    @ransh: mmap always creates a single contiguous mapping of virtual addresses so you can use it as an array. The underlying physical pages don't have to be contiguous or in any particular order, as usual with virtual memory. – Peter Cordes May 10 '18 at 22:08
  • mmap can merge new mappings with compatible mappings with the result that munmap returns ENOMEM if unmapping would result in the limit of mapping being exceeded. – Timothy Baldwin Jul 6 at 15:42

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