I tried the following code...

string pass = "";
Console.Write("Enter your password: ");
ConsoleKeyInfo key;

do
{
    key = Console.ReadKey(true);

    // Backspace Should Not Work
    if (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Backspace)
    {
        pass += key.KeyChar;
        Console.Write("*");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.Write("\b");
    }
}
// Stops Receving Keys Once Enter is Pressed
while (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter);

Console.WriteLine();
Console.WriteLine("The Password You entered is : " + pass);

But this way the backspace functionality doesn't work while typing the password. Any suggestion?

  • 10
    I suggest you do not echo anything back to the console because that'll expose the length of the password. – Ray Cheng Aug 15 '12 at 20:41
  • 7
    @RayCheng - fair enough, but very few user interfaces (other than on some Unix systems) echo nothing at all. For consistent user experience with other apps and websites, showing the * characters is probably best. – Stephen Holt Feb 19 '14 at 14:02
  • 2
    @StephenHolt I'm fairly certain every terminal-based password input I've ever encountered chose to echo nothing to the terminal. Given the security benefits and the fact that this is a well-known convention in the Unix world, I personally think echoing nothing is the right choice, unless you believe your user base is likely to be unfamiliar with the use of terminals (in which case it's probably best to use a GUI instead anyway). – Ajedi32 Jan 3 '17 at 16:00

15 Answers 15

up vote 166 down vote accepted

Console.Write("\b \b"); will delete the asterisk character from the screen, but you do not have any code within your else block that removes the previously entered character from your pass string variable.

Here's the relevant working code that should do what you require:

string pass = "";
do
{
    ConsoleKeyInfo key = Console.ReadKey(true);
    // Backspace Should Not Work
    if (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Backspace && key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter)
    {
        pass += key.KeyChar;
        Console.Write("*");
    }
    else
    {
        if (key.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && pass.Length > 0)
        {
            pass = pass.Substring(0, (pass.Length - 1));
            Console.Write("\b \b");
        }
        else if(key.Key == ConsoleKey.Enter)
        {
            break;
        }
    }
} while (true);
  • 1
    Oh I thought \b \b will take me two places back. Nevertheless this seems to be working prfecttly. – Mohammad Nadeem Aug 4 '10 at 10:16
  • 6
    @Nadeem: Note the space character (' ') between the backspace characters ('\b'). "\b \b" takes you one place back, then prints a space (which takes you one place forward) and then takes you back again, so you end up where the deleted '*' character was. – dtb Aug 4 '10 at 10:23
  • 10
    @Nadeem - The first \b moves the cursor back one position (now underneath the last * char. The [space] character "prints over" the asterisk, but also moves the cursor one character forward again, so the last \b moves the cursor back to where the last * used to be! (Phew - Hope that makes sense!) – CraigTP Aug 4 '10 at 10:27
  • 2
    if (pass.Length > 0) should be if (key.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && pass.Length > 0) otherwise you will not get the last character of the password.. – MemphiZ Sep 13 '12 at 19:15
  • 4
    If you don't want the user to be able to write control characters (like F5 or Escape), you could replace if (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Backspace && key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter) with if (!char.IsControl(key.KeyChar)). – Safron Jun 24 '15 at 13:24

For this you should use the System.Security.SecureString

public SecureString GetPassword()
{
    var pwd = new SecureString();
    while (true)
    {
        ConsoleKeyInfo i = Console.ReadKey(true);
        if (i.Key == ConsoleKey.Enter)
        {
            break;
        }
        else if (i.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace)
        {
            if (pwd.Length > 0)
            {
                pwd.RemoveAt(pwd.Length - 1);
                Console.Write("\b \b");
            }
        }
        else if (i.KeyChar != '\u0000' ) // KeyChar == '\u0000' if the key pressed does not correspond to a printable character, e.g. F1, Pause-Break, etc
        {
            pwd.AppendChar(i.KeyChar);
            Console.Write("*");
        }
    }
    return pwd;
}
  • This will only take me two places back. But what I need is that when I press Backspace the last character should be deleted. Just like the original functinality of backspace. – Mohammad Nadeem Aug 4 '10 at 10:08
  • 1
    I needed to nest if( pwd.Length > 0) into the first else statement to stop people deleting the question :) – Dead.Rabit Jun 25 '12 at 10:18
  • 1
    Perfect for use with System.Net.NetworkCredential(). – mbrownnyc Nov 7 '13 at 18:20
  • 1
    Similarly to Safron's comment on the currently accepted answer, the final else clause would benefit from a test if (!char.IsControl(i.KeyChar)) (or at the very least if (i.KeyChar != '\u0000')). – Peter Taylor Nov 11 '15 at 12:22

Complete solution, vanilla C# .net 3.5+

Cut & Paste :)

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;

    namespace ConsoleReadPasswords
    {
        class Program
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                Console.Write("Password:");

                string password = Orb.App.Console.ReadPassword();

                Console.WriteLine("Sorry - I just can't keep a secret!");
                Console.WriteLine("Your password was:\n<Password>{0}</Password>", password);

                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }

    namespace Orb.App
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Adds some nice help to the console. Static extension methods don't exist (probably for a good reason) so the next best thing is congruent naming.
        /// </summary>
        static public class Console
        {
            /// <summary>
            /// Like System.Console.ReadLine(), only with a mask.
            /// </summary>
            /// <param name="mask">a <c>char</c> representing your choice of console mask</param>
            /// <returns>the string the user typed in </returns>
            public static string ReadPassword(char mask)
            {
                const int ENTER = 13, BACKSP = 8, CTRLBACKSP = 127;
                int[] FILTERED = { 0, 27, 9, 10 /*, 32 space, if you care */ }; // const

                var pass = new Stack<char>();
                char chr = (char)0;

                while ((chr = System.Console.ReadKey(true).KeyChar) != ENTER)
                {
                    if (chr == BACKSP)
                    {
                        if (pass.Count > 0)
                        {
                            System.Console.Write("\b \b");
                            pass.Pop();
                        }
                    }
                    else if (chr == CTRLBACKSP)
                    {
                        while (pass.Count > 0)
                        {
                            System.Console.Write("\b \b");
                            pass.Pop();
                        }
                    }
                    else if (FILTERED.Count(x => chr == x) > 0) { }
                    else
                    {
                        pass.Push((char)chr);
                        System.Console.Write(mask);
                    }
                }

                System.Console.WriteLine();

                return new string(pass.Reverse().ToArray());
            }

            /// <summary>
            /// Like System.Console.ReadLine(), only with a mask.
            /// </summary>
            /// <returns>the string the user typed in </returns>
            public static string ReadPassword()
            {
                return Orb.App.Console.ReadPassword('*');
            }
        }
    }
  • 1
    It can always be more difficult :) Won't work on Mac/Linux because the newline is not recognised. Environment.NewLine has the string for a newline. So I modified this into: while (!Environment.NewLine.Contains(chr = System.Console.ReadKey(true).KeyChar)) – Hugo Logmans Jul 17 at 14:34

Taking the top answer, as well as the suggestions from it's comments, and modifying it to use SecureString instead of String, test for all control keys, and not error or write an extra "*" to the screen when the password length is 0, my solution is:

public static SecureString getPasswordFromConsole(String displayMessage) {
    SecureString pass = new SecureString();
    Console.Write(displayMessage);
    ConsoleKeyInfo key;

    do {
        key = Console.ReadKey(true);

        // Backspace Should Not Work
        if (!char.IsControl(key.KeyChar)) {
            pass.AppendChar(key.KeyChar);
            Console.Write("*");
        } else {
            if (key.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && pass.Length > 0) {
                pass.RemoveAt(pass.Length - 1);
                Console.Write("\b \b");
            }
        }
    }
    // Stops Receving Keys Once Enter is Pressed
    while (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter);
    return pass;
}

Mine ignores control characters and handles line wrapping:

public static string ReadLineMasked(char mask = '*')
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    ConsoleKeyInfo keyInfo;
    while ((keyInfo = Console.ReadKey(true)).Key != ConsoleKey.Enter)
    {
        if (!char.IsControl(keyInfo.KeyChar))
        {
            sb.Append(keyInfo.KeyChar);
            Console.Write(mask);
        }
        else if (keyInfo.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && sb.Length > 0)
        {
            sb.Remove(sb.Length - 1, 1);

            if (Console.CursorLeft == 0)
            {
                Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.BufferWidth - 1, Console.CursorTop - 1);
                Console.Write(' ');
                Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.BufferWidth - 1, Console.CursorTop - 1);
            }
            else Console.Write("\b \b");
        }
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
    return sb.ToString();
}
  • Works perfectly. You may have to add code to make the DELETE character erase all entered text though. Its key sequence is CTRL + BACKSPACE and its char code is 0x7f. – Alex Essilfie Jun 26 '17 at 16:39

Reading console input is hard, you need to handle special keys like Ctrl, Alt, also cursor keys and Backspace/Delete. On some keyboard layouts, like Swedish Ctrl is even needed to enter keys that exist directly on US keyboard. I believe that trying to handle this using the "low-level" Console.ReadKey(true) is just very hard, so the easiest and most robust way is to just to disable "console input echo" during entering password using a bit of WINAPI.

The sample below is based on answer to Read a password from std::cin question.

    private enum StdHandle
    {
        Input = -10,
        Output = -11,
        Error = -12,
    }

    private enum ConsoleMode
    {
        ENABLE_ECHO_INPUT = 4
    }

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    private static extern IntPtr GetStdHandle(StdHandle nStdHandle);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    private static extern bool GetConsoleMode(IntPtr hConsoleHandle, out int lpMode);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    private static extern bool SetConsoleMode(IntPtr hConsoleHandle, int dwMode);

    public static string ReadPassword()
    {
        IntPtr stdInputHandle = GetStdHandle(StdHandle.Input);
        if (stdInputHandle == IntPtr.Zero)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("No console input");
        }

        int previousConsoleMode;
        if (!GetConsoleMode(stdInputHandle , out previousConsoleMode))
        {
            throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(), "Could not get console mode.");
        }

        // disable console input echo
        if (!SetConsoleMode(stdInputHandle , previousConsoleMode & ~(int)ConsoleMode.ENABLE_ECHO_INPUT))
        {
            throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(), "Could not disable console input echo.");
        }

        // just read the password using standard Console.ReadLine()
        string password = Console.ReadLine();

        // reset console mode to previous
        if (!SetConsoleMode(stdInputHandle , previousConsoleMode))
        {
            throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error(), "Could not reset console mode.");
        }

        return password;
    }

This masks the password with a red square, then reverts back to the original colours once the password has been entered.

It doesn't stop the user from using copy/paste to get the password, but if it's more just about stopping someone looking over your shoulder, this is a good quick solution.

Console.Write("Password ");
ConsoleColor origBG = Console.BackgroundColor; // Store original values
ConsoleColor origFG = Console.ForegroundColor;

Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Red; // Set the block colour (could be anything)
Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Red;

string Password = Console.ReadLine(); // read the password

Console.BackgroundColor= origBG; // revert back to original
Console.ForegroundColor= origFG;
  • 3
    upvote for the uniqueness and ingenuity – Roman Apr 11 at 15:43
  • The only problem is that if you do backspace the background where you had characters stays red. I would rather go with setting ForegroundColor as origBG to have a Linux style password input. – mababin Aug 17 at 19:04
  • You could also do Console.CursorVisible=false and set it back to previous value after. This would prevent someone to peak at password length. – mababin Aug 17 at 19:12

I found a bug in shermy's vanilla C# 3.5 .NET solution which otherwise works a charm. I have also incorporated Damian Leszczyński - Vash's SecureString idea here but you can use an ordinary string if you prefer.

THE BUG: If you press backspace during the password prompt and the current length of the password is 0 then an asterisk is incorrectly inserted in the password mask. To fix this bug modify the following method.

    public static string ReadPassword(char mask)
    {
        const int ENTER = 13, BACKSP = 8, CTRLBACKSP = 127;
        int[] FILTERED = { 0, 27, 9, 10 /*, 32 space, if you care */ }; // const


        SecureString securePass = new SecureString();

        char chr = (char)0;

        while ((chr = System.Console.ReadKey(true).KeyChar) != ENTER)
        {
            if (((chr == BACKSP) || (chr == CTRLBACKSP)) 
                && (securePass.Length > 0))
            {
                System.Console.Write("\b \b");
                securePass.RemoveAt(securePass.Length - 1);

            }
            // Don't append * when length is 0 and backspace is selected
            else if (((chr == BACKSP) || (chr == CTRLBACKSP)) && (securePass.Length == 0))
            {
            }

            // Don't append when a filtered char is detected
            else if (FILTERED.Count(x => chr == x) > 0)
            {
            }

            // Append and write * mask
            else
            {
                securePass.AppendChar(chr);
                System.Console.Write(mask);
            }
        }

        System.Console.WriteLine();
        IntPtr ptr = new IntPtr();
        ptr = Marshal.SecureStringToBSTR(securePass);
        string plainPass = Marshal.PtrToStringBSTR(ptr);
        Marshal.ZeroFreeBSTR(ptr);
        return plainPass;
    }

You could append your keys to an accumulating linked list.

When a backspace key is received, remove the last key from the list.

When you receive the enter key, collapse your list into a string and do the rest of your work.

  • Sounds achievable but how will I remove the last character from the display. – Mohammad Nadeem Aug 4 '10 at 10:09

I made some changes for backspace

        string pass = "";
        Console.Write("Enter your password: ");
        ConsoleKeyInfo key;

        do
        {
            key = Console.ReadKey(true);

            // Backspace Should Not Work
            if (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Backspace)
            {
                pass += key.KeyChar;
                Console.Write("*");
            }
            else
            {
                pass = pass.Remove(pass.Length - 1);
                Console.Write("\b \b");
            }
        }
        // Stops Receving Keys Once Enter is Pressed
        while (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter);

        Console.WriteLine();
        Console.WriteLine("The Password You entered is : " + pass);

I have updated Ronnie's version after spending way too much time trying to enter a password only to find out that I had my CAPS LOCK on!

With this version what ever the message is in _CapsLockMessage will "float" at the end of the typing area and will be displayed in red.

This version takes a bit more code and does require a polling loop. On my computer CPU usage about 3% to 4%, but one could always add a small Sleep() value to decrease CPU usage if needed.

    private const string _CapsLockMessage = " CAPS LOCK";

    /// <summary>
    /// Like System.Console.ReadLine(), only with a mask.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="mask">a <c>char</c> representing your choice of console mask</param>
    /// <returns>the string the user typed in</returns>
    public static string ReadLineMasked(char mask = '*')
    {
        // Taken from http://stackoverflow.com/a/19770778/486660
        var consoleLine = new StringBuilder();
        ConsoleKeyInfo keyInfo;
        bool isDone;
        bool isAlreadyLocked;
        bool isCapsLockOn;
        int cursorLeft;
        int cursorTop;
        ConsoleColor originalForegroundColor;

        isDone = false;
        isAlreadyLocked = Console.CapsLock;

        while (isDone == false)
        {
            isCapsLockOn = Console.CapsLock;
            if (isCapsLockOn != isAlreadyLocked)
            {
                if (isCapsLockOn)
                {
                    cursorLeft = Console.CursorLeft;
                    cursorTop = Console.CursorTop;
                    originalForegroundColor = Console.ForegroundColor;
                    Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Red;
                    Console.Write("{0}", _CapsLockMessage);
                    Console.SetCursorPosition(cursorLeft, cursorTop);
                    Console.ForegroundColor = originalForegroundColor;
                }
                else
                {
                    cursorLeft = Console.CursorLeft;
                    cursorTop = Console.CursorTop;
                    Console.Write("{0}", string.Empty.PadRight(_CapsLockMessage.Length));
                    Console.SetCursorPosition(cursorLeft, cursorTop);
                }
                isAlreadyLocked = isCapsLockOn;
            }

            if (Console.KeyAvailable)
            {
                keyInfo = Console.ReadKey(intercept: true);

                if (keyInfo.Key == ConsoleKey.Enter)
                {
                    isDone = true;
                    continue;
                }

                if (!char.IsControl(keyInfo.KeyChar))
                {
                    consoleLine.Append(keyInfo.KeyChar);
                    Console.Write(mask);
                }
                else if (keyInfo.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && consoleLine.Length > 0)
                {
                    consoleLine.Remove(consoleLine.Length - 1, 1);

                    if (Console.CursorLeft == 0)
                    {
                        Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.BufferWidth - 1, Console.CursorTop - 1);
                        Console.Write(' ');
                        Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.BufferWidth - 1, Console.CursorTop - 1);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        Console.Write("\b \b");
                    }
                }

                if (isCapsLockOn)
                {
                    cursorLeft = Console.CursorLeft;
                    cursorTop = Console.CursorTop;
                    originalForegroundColor = Console.ForegroundColor;
                    Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Red;
                    Console.Write("{0}", _CapsLockMessage);
                    Console.CursorLeft = cursorLeft;
                    Console.CursorTop = cursorTop;
                    Console.ForegroundColor = originalForegroundColor;
                }
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine();

        return consoleLine.ToString();
    }

Here is my simple version. Every time you hit a key, delete all from console and draw as many '*' as the length of password string is.

int chr = 0;
string pass = "";
const int ENTER = 13;
const int BS = 8;

do
{
   chr = Console.ReadKey().KeyChar;
   Console.Clear(); //imediately clear the char you printed

   //if the char is not 'return' or 'backspace' add it to pass string
   if (chr != ENTER && chr != BS) pass += (char)chr;

   //if you hit backspace remove last char from pass string
   if (chr == BS) pass = pass.Remove(pass.Length-1, 1);

   for (int i = 0; i < pass.Length; i++)
   {
      Console.Write('*');
   }
} 
 while (chr != ENTER);

Console.Write("\n");
Console.Write(pass);

Console.Read(); //just to see the pass

Here's a version that adds support for the Escape key (which returns a null string)

public static string ReadPassword()
{
    string password = "";
    while (true)
    {
        ConsoleKeyInfo key = Console.ReadKey(true);
        switch (key.Key)
        {
            case ConsoleKey.Escape:
                return null;
            case ConsoleKey.Enter:
                return password;
            case ConsoleKey.Backspace:
                password = password.Substring(0, (password.Length - 1));
                Console.Write("\b \b");
                break;
            default:
                password += key.KeyChar;
                Console.Write("*");
                break;
        }
    }
}

If I understand this correctly, you're trying to make backspace delete both the visible * character on screen and the cached character in your pass variable?

If so, then just change your else block to this:

            else
            {
                Console.Write("\b");
                pass = pass.Remove(pass.Length -1);
            }
  • 1
    This will work fine except that the deletion of the character by backspace will not be displayed. – Mohammad Nadeem Aug 4 '10 at 10:11
        string pass = "";
        Console.WriteLine("Enter your password: ");
        ConsoleKeyInfo key;

        do
        {
            key = Console.ReadKey(true);

            if (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Backspace)
            {
                pass += key.KeyChar;
                Console.Write("*");
            }
            else
            {
                Console.Write("\b \b");
                char[] pas = pass.ToCharArray();
                string temp = "";
                for (int i = 0; i < pass.Length - 1; i++)
                {
                    temp += pas[i];
                }
                pass = temp;
            }
        }
        // Stops Receving Keys Once Enter is Pressed
        while (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter);

        Console.WriteLine();
        Console.WriteLine("The Password You entered is : " + pass);
  • 1
    This answer does not add anything beyond what existing answers to. Additionally, good answers should typically explain the code, rather than just pasting code in to the answer box. Please read How to Answer – durron597 Aug 1 '15 at 17:53

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.