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How do I use a "*" CSS wildcard selector when using SASS? For instance, how would I make the following CSS code SASSy?

* {
  -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
     -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
          box-sizing: border-box;
  line-height: 1;
}
*:before,
*:after {
  -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
     -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
          box-sizing: border-box;
}

Edit:

Thank you for the answers so far, but let me clarify. I realize that there are many different perspectives on the code sample. The code sample is not the question. The question remains, how do I use the * selector? The SASS parser throws a syntax error when it encounters the * and says that it encountered *, but expected a selector. I'm using Sass 3.4.19 (Selective Steve) on Mac OSX 10.9.5.

Edit 2:

I have found the solution. The error was being cause by a missing ; in a file that was included on the line immediately preceding the * code block. Such is the life of dealing with other people's code. I'm going to award the answer to @torazaburo since he was the only one who actually addressed the question and made me rethink other possibilities.

10
  • Why do you want to make it "SASSy"? What do you think "SASSy" means? Why would you think that the * would work differently in a CSS preprocessor than in regular CSS? By the way, box-sizing requires no vendor prefix.
    – user663031
    Dec 3, 2015 at 5:20
  • The SASS parser does not allow the * selector. Please see my edit.
    – Nilpo
    Dec 3, 2015 at 18:27
  • Cannot reproduce, wildcard selector does not throw a syntax error: sassmeister.com/gist/2cc406d17d20904bfddd
    – cimmanon
    Dec 3, 2015 at 18:40
  • 1
    But that's my point. "Is X valid?" is a terrible question that can only be answered by either "Yes" or "No". You could have answered it by testing it for yourself. torazaburo should have known better than to answer such a question in the first place.
    – cimmanon
    Dec 3, 2015 at 18:48
  • 1
    @cimmanon My very first comment on the question was Why would you think that the * would work differently in a CSS preprocessor than in regular CSS?, so that would have been a really good time for the OP to pipe up about the * not working for him at all, in which case things would have gone in a much different direction. As it was, the question simply seemed to be about modifying some CSS that happened to involved the asterisk to be more SASS like.
    – user663031
    Dec 3, 2015 at 19:00

2 Answers 2

4

There's little here that SASS can help you with. You do not need vendor prefixes. Just write

*, ::before, ::after {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

* {
  line-height: 1;
}

Whether to write *::before or ::before is a matter of personal preference.

The I-must-use-SASS mentality would be to say I must write the

*::before 

rule as

* { 
  &::before

because I must use nesting, no matter what, just because I can. Actually, not. Your CSS is often much cleaner with less (or zero) nesting. (Often it's clearer with no SASS at all, but that's a topic for another day.)

How do I use a * CSS wildcard selector when using SASS?

There is nothing special about the * to SASS. It's just another selector. You use it like you use any other selector.

3
  • 1
    It's also worth noting that if you absolutely must give in to the nesting temptation you can use *{ line-height: 1; &,&::before,&::after{ box-sizing: border-box; } } to self reference the parent element using &, Dec 3, 2015 at 10:22
  • I understand SASS, this was an arbitrary example. The question is how to use a * selector. You mention that SASS views it as just another selector, but in fact it throws a syntax error. SASS does not like the * character.
    – Nilpo
    Dec 3, 2015 at 18:23
  • I have accepted your answer. Please see my comments in the OP.
    – Nilpo
    Dec 3, 2015 at 18:43
-1
*
 ...
  &:before, &:after
    ...

& stands for the current selector. e.g. foo { .bar { } } is foo .bar; foo { &.bar { } } matches foo.bar.

3
  • What's the advantage of doing that in this case?
    – user663031
    Dec 3, 2015 at 5:25
  • 1
    @torazaburo: I did not pay attention that the block was the same; had I noticed it, I would probably have answered as you did. But in general, when it specifies exceptions to the more general rules, nesting improves clarity; I thought the user was asking about the general case, and SASS syntax.
    – Amadan
    Dec 3, 2015 at 5:28
  • yes he is asking general case and sass/scss syntax. Dec 3, 2015 at 6:07

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