19

In .net (c# or vb) expressions, how would you implement SQL's handy IN() functionality?

i.e. value in (1, 2, 4, 7)

rather than:

value = 1 or value = 2 or value = 4 or value = 7

  • what version of the .NET framework? – Mitch Wheat Aug 4 '10 at 13:56
  • I mainly use 3.5. Not sure if there's anthing in 4.0 that makes this easier? – Peter C Aug 4 '10 at 14:03
25
using System;
using System.Linq;

static class SqlStyleExtensions
{
    public static bool In(this string me, params string[] set)
    {
       return set.Contains(me);
    }
}

Usage:

if (Variable.In("AC", "BC", "EA"))
{

} 
  • 3
    You could also make the string a generic parameter... – ngoozeff Aug 4 '10 at 14:01
  • params makes the call really neat. – Peter C Aug 6 '10 at 16:52
  • 3
    Generic version - public static bool In<T>(this T me, params T[] List) – Peter C Aug 6 '10 at 22:14
  • +1. For using static extensions. – code4life Apr 10 '13 at 23:12
13

I have made an extension method for this that I find quite useful. However, it is not much more than syntactic sugar wrapping the existing IEnumerable.Contains() function.

/// <summary>
/// Returns true if the value is represented in the provided enumeration.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Type of the value</typeparam>
/// <param name="obj">The object to check if the enumeration contains</param>
/// <param name="values">The enumeration that might contain the object</param>
/// <returns>True if the object exists in the enumeration</returns>
public static bool In<T>(this T obj, IEnumerable<T> values) {
    return values.Contains(obj);
}

Edit: Someone beat me to it, damnit. I'll keep by post here though since it's a more generic version.

  • wasatz - i've posted a version below that's extended to full expression and lambda functionality. might be nice to try it as an alternative if you're using any IQueryables – jim tollan Aug 4 '10 at 15:51
8

I know there are LOADS of answers here, but here's my take on the subject, used daily in SubSonic. it's an extension method:

public static IQueryable<T> WhereIn<T, TValue>(
                this IQueryable<T> query,
                Expression<Func<T, TValue>> selector, 
                params TValue[] collection) where T : class
{
    if (selector == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("selector");
    if (collection == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("collection");
    ParameterExpression p = selector.Parameters.Single();

    if (!collection.Any()) return query;

    IEnumerable<Expression> equals = collection.Select(value =>
       (Expression)Expression.Equal(selector.Body,
            Expression.Constant(value, typeof(TValue))));

    Expression body = equals.Aggregate(Expression.Or);
    return query.Where(Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, p));
}

and WhereNotIn:

public static IQueryable<T> WhereNotIn<T, TValue>(
                this IQueryable<T> query, 
                Expression<Func<T, TValue>> selector, 
                params TValue[] collection) where T : class
{
    if (selector == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("selector");
    if (collection == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("collection");
    ParameterExpression p = selector.Parameters.Single();

    if (!collection.Any()) return query;

    IEnumerable<Expression> equals = collection.Select(value =>
       (Expression)Expression.NotEqual(selector.Body,
            Expression.Constant(value, typeof(TValue))));

    Expression body = equals.Aggregate(Expression.And);

    return query.Where(Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, p));
}

usage:

var args = new [] { 1, 2, 3 };
var bookings = _repository.Find(r => r.id > 0).WhereIn(x => x.BookingTypeID, args);
// OR we could just as easily plug args in as 1,2,3 as it's defined as params
var bookings2 = _repository.Find(r => r.id > 0).WhereIn(x => x.BookingTypeID, 1,2,3,90);

var bookings3 = _repository.Find(r => r.id > 0).WhereNotIn(x => x.BookingTypeID, 20,30,60);

this really makes me smile every time i review it :)

jim

[edit] - originally sourced from here on SO but modified to use iqueryable and params: 'Contains()' workaround using Linq to Entities?

6
if((new int[] {1, 2, 4, 7}).Contains(value))
{
    // Do some work.
}

As others have pointed out, you could create an In() Extension method (I'll keep it generic so you can use it on any type):

public static bool In<T>(T this obj, IEnumerable<T> col)
{
    return col.Contains(obj);
}

So the initial example becomes:

if(value.In(new int[] {1, 2, 4, 7}))
{
    // Do some work.
}
6

Or using System.Linq...

(VB.NET)

Enumerable.Contains({1, 2, 4, 7}, value)

or

{1, 2, 4, 7}.Contains(value)

(C#)

Enumerable.Contains(new int[]{1, 2, 4, 7}, value);

or

new int[] {1, 2, 4, 7}.Contains(value);
  • Just this: {1, 2, 4, 7}.Contains(value). – Neolisk Apr 11 '13 at 0:04
3

You can use Contains() method on the list.

    int myValue = 1;
    List<int> checkValues = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };

    if (checkValues.Contains(myValue))
        // Do something 
3

Using LINQ

var q = from x in collection
        where (new int[] { 1, 2, 4, 7}).Contains(x.value)
        select x
1

If you will do many lookups on the same dataset it is good from a performance perspective to use HashSet<T>.

HashSet<int> numbers = new HashSet<int> { 1, 2, 4, 7 };
bool is5inSet = numbers.Contains(5);
1

Here's some simple Linq with some pseudo code. No need to re-invent the wheel.

int[] values = new int[]{1, 2, 4, 7};
int target = 2;
bool contains = values.Any(v => v == target);

Or use .Contains as some have suggested.

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