1

I have a MySQL table with column as primary key and a column "words". "words" contains different terms, e.g. "table" or "automotive" or "school".

Now you can search with characters in random order in this MySQL Table. If you type in "hqaletabzu" MySQL should only display "table" because it is the only term you can build with this characters.

The search after "lohcsautmve" display "automative" and "school".

Does anyone know how to express this in MySQL?

5
  • what you want exactly Dec 3 '15 at 11:29
  • 1
    what is this, mysql Scrabble (r)
    – Drew
    Dec 3 '15 at 11:30
  • If you have 1 million words and you will search for abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz and 100 people do this at the same time, how much serverload are you planning to organize?
    – Daniel W.
    Dec 3 '15 at 11:35
  • No easy way to do this, and as the number of letters increases the complexity increases dramatically. Ie, with 1 letter there is one option, with 2 letters there are 4 options, with 3 letters there are 12 options, etc.
    – Kickstart
    Dec 3 '15 at 11:47
  • 2
    I don't agree that the question should be closed. The OQ spelled out what she wants fairly clearly. The general awfulness of the answer doesn't make the question bad.
    – O. Jones
    Dec 3 '15 at 11:50
1

MySQL is poorly suited to this task.

You can do it with

 WHERE col LIKE '%t%'
   AND col LIKE '%a%'
   AND col LIKE '%b%'
   AND col LIKE '%l%'
   AND col LIKE '%e%'

but performance will be terrible.

1
  • I would be interested in the reason for downvote, this is the only suitable answer imo.
    – Daniel W.
    Dec 3 '15 at 11:36
1

The only way I can think to do this with any kind of efficiency would be to split up the words, both the ones on the table and the string being searched for, into individual letters stored separately. With the least possible DB changes store the word as a comma separated list of letters, but it would be better to store each letter in another table, one row per letter per row on the first table

For example of the first idea.

MyTable
id  word        letters             letter_count
1   Table       t,a,b,l,e           5
2   School      s,c,h,o,l           5
3   Automotive  a,u,t,o,m,i,v,e     8

the folowing sql

SELECT MyTable.id, MyTable.word 
FROM MyTable
WHERE (IF(FIND_IN_SET('l', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('o', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('h', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('c', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('s', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('a', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('u', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('t', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('m', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('v', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)
+ IF(FIND_IN_SET('e', MyTable.letters), 1, 0)) >= MyTable.letter_count

This is not using indexes, but I think will be marginally quicker than using LIKE. But still very slow and not that nice

Bit more flexible, and coping with words of up to 100 letter you could do something like this. Still nasty to read and won't be fast, but easy to just plonk in the jumble of letters you are searching for (untested so please excuse any typos):-

SELECT MyTable.id, MyTable.word, MyTable.letter_count, COUNT(*) as letter_match
FROM MyTable
INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT SUBSTR('hqaletabzu', tens.aCnt * 10 + units.aCnt + 1, 1) AS aLetter
    FROM
    (SELECT 1 aCnt UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5 UNION SELECT 6 UNION SELECT 7 UNION SELECT 8 UNION SELECT 9 UNION SELECT 0) units
    CROSS JOIN
    (SELECT 1 aCnt UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5 UNION SELECT 6 UNION SELECT 7 UNION SELECT 8 UNION SELECT 9 UNION SELECT 0) tens
    WHERE LENGTH('hqaletabzu') > (tens.aCnt * 10 + units.aCnt)
) sub1
ON FIND_IN_SET(aLetter, MyTable.letters)
GROUP BY MyTable.id, MyTable.word, MyTable.letter_count
HAVING letter_match >= letter_count

EDIT

Further suggestion using a table of letters. This should be quicker as if indexes are set up they can be taken advantage of.

Demo tables:-

CREATE TABLE MyTable
(
    id  INT,
    word    VARCHAR(255)
);


INSERT INTO MyTable (id, word) VALUES
(1, 'Table'),
(2, 'School'),
(3, 'Automotive');


CREATE TABLE MyTableLetters
(
    id  INT,
    mytable_id  INT,
    letter  CHAR(1)
);

INSERT INTO MyTableLetters VALUES
(NULL, 1, 't'),
(NULL, 1, 'a'),
(NULL, 1, 'b'),
(NULL, 1, 'l'),
(NULL, 1, 'e'),
(NULL, 2, 's'),
(NULL, 2, 'c'),
(NULL, 2, 'h'),
(NULL, 2, 'o'),
(NULL, 2, 'l'),
(NULL, 3, 'a'),
(NULL, 3, 'u'),
(NULL, 3, 't'),
(NULL, 3, 'o'),
(NULL, 3, 'm'),
(NULL, 3, 'i'),
(NULL, 3, 'v'),
(NULL, 3, 'e');

With these tables the following SQL will get you what you want:-

SELECT MyTable.id, MyTable.word, COUNT(MyTableLetters.id) AS MyTableLetters_count, COUNT(aLetter) as letter_match
FROM MyTable
INNER JOIN MyTableLetters ON MyTable.id = MyTableLetters.mytable_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN
(
    SELECT DISTINCT SUBSTR('hqaletabzu', tens.aCnt * 10 + units.aCnt + 1, 1) AS aLetter
    FROM
    (SELECT 1 aCnt UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5 UNION SELECT 6 UNION SELECT 7 UNION SELECT 8 UNION SELECT 9 UNION SELECT 0) units
    CROSS JOIN
    (SELECT 1 aCnt UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5 UNION SELECT 6 UNION SELECT 7 UNION SELECT 8 UNION SELECT 9 UNION SELECT 0) tens
    WHERE LENGTH('hqaletabzu') > (tens.aCnt * 10 + units.aCnt)
) sub1
ON sub1.aLetter = MyTableLetters.letter
GROUP BY MyTable.id, MyTable.word
HAVING letter_match >= MyTableLetters_count

Note that the main sub query splits up the search letters into a row per letter, and eliminates duplicate letters.

3
  • thank you very much, that looks very good but I think the performance will be bad. Is there another possibilty besides SQL to do this task?
    – psim
    Dec 4 '15 at 17:07
  • Nice tho! I think this can be modded using Dynamic Columns in MariaDB
    – Daniel W.
    Dec 5 '15 at 1:19
  • @psim - Problem with doing it outside of SQL is that you could land up having to return a massive number of rows to (say) php and then process those slowly. The last solution should be reasonable. If you were prepared to set up a table / temp table to store the random letters you are searching for then it could avoid the sub query and use a properly indexed join which should be fast.
    – Kickstart
    Dec 7 '15 at 9:24

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