-3

I have the following query that displays the top 10 most drawn pairs of numbers from the whole table

select 
    p, count(p) as frequency
from
    (SELECT 
         id, 
         CASE power1 <= power2 WHEN TRUE THEN CONCAT(power1,"-",power2) ELSE CONCAT(power2,"-",power1) 
         END p 
     FROM power 
     UNION
     SELECT 
         id, 
         CASE power1<=power3 WHEN TRUE THEN CONCAT(power1,"-",power3) ELSE CONCAT(power3,"-",power1) END p 
     FROM power 
     UNION
     SELECT 
         id, 
         CASE power1<=power4 WHEN TRUE THEN CONCAT(power1,"-",power4) ELSE CONCAT(power4,"-",power1) END p 
     FROM power 
     UNION
     ...............................................
     SELECT 
         id, 
         CASE power19<=power20 WHEN TRUE THEN CONCAT(power19,"-",power20) ELSE CONCAT(power20,"-",power19) 
         END p 
     FROM power) as b
group by 
    p
order by 
    frequency desc, p asc
limit
    0, 10
  1. How can I impose a limit to take just the first 100 lines in descending order by ID? The query would be like this:

    ORDER BY id LIMIT 0,100

    But I haven't been able to adapt it for the above.

  2. Could the code be optimized more than that?

  3. power1, Power2 are values from tables.... would it work if i would have a string like 3,4,5,6 and then explode "," and after that power1 becomes 3, power2 to become 4, etc?

I mean the table format to look something like this :

table2

LATER EDIT :

I have table like this :

Table: data

+----+----+-----+
| id | nr | set | 
+----+----+-----+
|  1 | 52 |   1 | 
|  2 | 47 |   1 | 
|  3 |  4 |   1 | 
|  4 |  3 |   1 | 
|  5 | 77 |   1 | 
|  6 | 71 |   1 | 
|  7 |  6 |   1 | 
|  8 | 41 |   1 | 
|  9 | 15 |   1 | 
| 10 | 79 |   1 | 
| 11 | 35 |   2 | 
| 12 | 50 |   2 | 
| 13 | 16 |   2 | 
| 14 |  1 |   2 | 
| 15 | 32 |   2 | 
| 16 | 77 |   2 | 
| 17 | 30 |   2 | 
| 18 |  7 |   2 | 
| 19 | 20 |   2 | 
| 20 | 28 |   2 | 
| .. | .. | ... | 
+----+----+-----+

I have like 34360 id

And the following query :

SELECT 
    `n1`.`nr` AS `num_1`,
    `n2`.`nr` AS `num_2`,
    COUNT(1) AS `total`

FROM (select * from data ORDER BY id DESC limit 0,1000) AS `n1`

JOIN `data` AS `n2` 
    ON `n1`.`set` = `n2`.`set` AND `n1`.`nr` < `n2`.`nr`

GROUP BY `n1`.`nr`, `n2`.`nr`
ORDER BY `total` DESC
LIMIT 20

And is working fine !

I would like to know how i can find out the pairs of numbers that have not been drawn together for the longest time. Per example:

  • 1,42 (together, as a pair) has not been drawn for 24 draws
  • 32,45-as a pair as well-has not been drawn for 22 draws
  • etc
3
  • 2
    On the face of it, there's so much wrong here, I'm not sure where to begin. But normalisation mmight be a good place to start. – Strawberry Dec 3 '15 at 13:45
  • Normalization .... like this ? i.stack.imgur.com/OsfKm.png – Xander Dec 3 '15 at 14:27
  • No. That is the opposite of normalization. – Strawberry Dec 3 '15 at 14:32
2

Consider the following:

Un-normalised:

id power1 power2 power3 power4
 1      4      9     10     16
 2      6     12     15     19
 3      2      4      6      7
 4      3      8     15     17
 5      2     10     11     14
 6      4     10     12     19
 7      1      4      9     11

Normalised:

 id power value
  1     1     4    
  1     2     9    
  1     3    10    
  1     4    16
  2     1     6     
  2     2    12    
  2     3    15
  2     4    19
  3     1     2     
  3     2     4     
  3     3     6     
  3     4     7
  4     1     3     
  4     2     8     
  4     3    15    
  4     4    17
  5     1     2     
  5     2    10    
  5     3    11    
  5     4    14
  6     1     4     
  6     2    10    
  6     3    12    
  6     4    19
  7     1     1     
  7     2     4     
  7     3     9     
  7     4    11

So...

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS my_table;

CREATE TABLE my_table
(id INT NOT NULL
,power INT NOT NULL
,value INT NOT NULL
,PRIMARY KEY(id,power)
);

INSERT INTO my_table VALUES
(1,1,4),(1,2,9),(1,3,10),(1,4,16),
(2,1,6),(2,2,12),(2,3,15),(2,4,19),
(3,1,2),(3,2,4),(3,3,6),(3,4,7),
(4,1,3),(4,2,8),(4,3,15),(4,4,17),
(5,1,2),(5,2,10),(5,3,11),(5,4,14),
(6,1,4),(6,2,10),(6,3,12),(6,4,19),
(7,1,1),(7,2,4),(7,3,9),(7,4,11);

SELECT LEAST(x.value,y.value)a -- LEAST/GREATEST is only necessary in the event that 
     , GREATEST(x.value,y.value) b -- power1 value may be greater than powerN value
     , COUNT(*) freq 
  FROM my_table x 
  JOIN my_table y 
    ON y.id = x.id 
   AND y.power < x.power 
 GROUP 
    BY LEAST(x.value, y.value) -- again only necessary if using LEAST/GREATEST above
     , GREATEST(x.value,y.value) 
 ORDER 
    BY freq DESC
     , a
     , b;
+----+----+------+
| a  | b  | freq |
+----+----+------+
|  4 |  9 |    2 |
|  4 | 10 |    2 |
| 12 | 19 |    2 |
|  1 |  4 |    1 |
|  1 |  9 |    1 |
|  1 | 11 |    1 |
|  2 |  4 |    1 |
|  2 |  6 |    1 |
|  2 |  7 |    1 |
|  2 | 10 |    1 |
|  2 | 11 |    1 |
|  2 | 14 |    1 |
|  3 |  8 |    1 |
|  3 | 15 |    1 |
|  3 | 17 |    1 |
|  4 |  6 |    1 |
|  4 |  7 |    1 |
|  4 | 11 |    1 |
|  4 | 12 |    1 |
|  4 | 16 |    1 |
|  4 | 19 |    1 |
|  6 |  7 |    1 |
|  6 | 12 |    1 |
|  6 | 15 |    1 |
|  6 | 19 |    1 |
|  8 | 15 |    1 |
|  8 | 17 |    1 |
|  9 | 10 |    1 |
|  9 | 11 |    1 |
|  9 | 16 |    1 |
| 10 | 11 |    1 |
| 10 | 12 |    1 |
| 10 | 14 |    1 |
| 10 | 16 |    1 |
| 10 | 19 |    1 |
| 11 | 14 |    1 |
| 12 | 15 |    1 |
| 15 | 17 |    1 |
| 15 | 19 |    1 |
+----+----+------+
3
  • Thanks, i can do that. But i don't know how to adapt for my query. – Xander Dec 3 '15 at 14:47
  • @Xander Again, see above. – Strawberry Dec 3 '15 at 15:05
  • 1
    a good answer. Deserves a sprinkle of points imho. To those willing to roll up their sleeves and do it right – Drew Dec 3 '15 at 22:21
0

While I fully agree with @Strawberry about normalising your data, the following is an example of how to possibly do it with your current data structure (not tested).

SELECT CASE a.power_val <= b.power_val WHEN TRUE THEN CONCAT(a.power_val,"-",b.power_val) ELSE CONCAT(b.power_val,"-",a.power_val) END p, 
        COUNT(a.id) as frequency
FROM
(
    SELECT id,1 AS power_col, power1 AS power_val FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,2, power2 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,3, power3 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,4, power4 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,5, power5 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,6, power6 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,7, power7 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,8, power8 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,9, power9 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,10, power10 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,11, power11 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,12, power12 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,13, power13 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,14, power14 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,15, power15 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,16, power16 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,17, power17 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,18, power18 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,19, power19 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,20, power20 FROM power 
    ORDER BY id DESC
    LIMIT 2000
) a
INNER JOIN 
(
    SELECT id, 1 AS power_col, power1 AS power_val FROM power UNION
    SELECT id, 2, power2 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,3, power3 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,4, power4 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,5, power5 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,6, power6 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,7, power7 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,8, power8 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,9, power9 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,10, power10 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,11, power11 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,12, power12 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,13, power13 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,14, power14 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,15, power15 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,16, power16 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,17, power17 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,18, power18 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,19, power19 FROM power UNION
    SELECT id,20, power20 FROM power 
    ORDER BY id DESC
    LIMIT 2000
) b
ON a.id = b.id
AND a.power_col != b.power_col
GROUP BY p
ORDER BY frequency DESC, p ASC
LIMIT 0,10

Note using normalised data structures would likely be far quicker.

EDIT

Think something like the following might give you what you need.

The big sub query is to get every possible combination (idea is to also cope with pairs that have never been used), with the first number being smaller than the 2nd just for consistency. This is then joined against the tables of data to get the matching numbers and the respective id fields. Then uses MIN to get the smallest id:-

SELECT all_combo.num_1, 
        all_combo.num_2, 
        MIN(d1.id)
FROM
(
    SELECT     sub0.nr AS num_1,
                sub1.nr AS num_2
    FROM
    (
        SELECT DISTINCT nr
        FROM data
    ) sub0
    INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT DISTINCT nr
        FROM data
    ) sub1
    WHERE sub0.nr < sub1.nr
) all_combo
LEFT OUTER JOIN data d1 ON all_combo.num_1
LEFT OUTER JOIN data d2 ON all_combo.num_2 AND d1.set = d2.set
GROUP BY all_combo.num_1, 
        all_combo.num_2
12
  • Thanks for your answer. It would be better for me to apply on this format table. But your code it doesnt work and i can't figure out where is the problem. – Xander Dec 3 '15 at 16:13
  • Done a few minor changes. Have you got some example data and the results you would expect from it? – Kickstart Dec 3 '15 at 16:31
  • Its woking now. I have like 9000 rows in my table. How can i search on entire table ? And for exemple how can i search only on last 100 ID for exemple. From your exemple i dont understand exactly what is LIMIT 2000. – – Xander Dec 3 '15 at 18:54
  • The LIMIT 2000 is getting for the last 100 id on the table (100 id x 20 columns = 2000). – Kickstart Dec 4 '15 at 9:46
  • No problem, but I really would recommend that you follow the advice of @Strawberry and normalise your database design. It will make things like this far easier, and also make it a lot easier when you need to change from 20 powers to (say) 30 powers. – Kickstart Dec 4 '15 at 10:24

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