10

I am doing some work in embedded C with an accelerometer that returns data as a 14 bit 2's complement number. I am storing this result directly into a uint16_t. Later in my code I am trying to convert this "raw" form of the data into a signed integer to represent / work with in the rest of my code.

I am having trouble getting the compiler to understand what I am trying to do. In the following code I'm checking if the 14th bit is set (meaning the number is negative) and then I want to invert the bits and add 1 to get the magnitude of the number.

int16_t fxls8471qr1_convert_raw_accel_to_mag(uint16_t raw, enum fxls8471qr1_fs_range range) {
  int16_t raw_signed;
  if(raw & _14BIT_SIGN_MASK) {
    // Convert 14 bit 2's complement to 16 bit 2's complement
    raw |= (1 << 15) | (1 << 14); // 2's complement extension
    raw_signed = -(~raw + 1);
  }
  else {
    raw_signed = raw;
  }
  uint16_t divisor;
  if(range == FXLS8471QR1_FS_RANGE_2G) {
    divisor = FS_DIV_2G;
  }
  else if(range == FXLS8471QR1_FS_RANGE_4G) {
    divisor = FS_DIV_4G;
  }
  else {
    divisor = FS_DIV_8G;
  }

  return ((int32_t)raw_signed * RAW_SCALE_FACTOR) / divisor;
}

This code unfortunately doesn't work. The disassembly shows me that for some reason the compiler is optimizing out my statement raw_signed = -(~raw + 1); How do I acheive the result I desire?

The math works out on paper, but I feel like for some reason the compiler is fighting with me :(.

  • 1
    If you turn up all the compiler warnings, do you get any relevant diagnostics? If you compile with optimization turned off does the program work as intended? – John Bollinger Dec 3 '15 at 21:02
  • 1
    And "my code doesn't work is not a specific problem statement. Unless you provide proof, the compiler is likely right optimising your code as it does. Use a debugger and debugging-friendly optimisations, e.g. gcc -Og. – too honest for this site Dec 3 '15 at 21:09
  • 1
    @WeatherVane Yes, but the current C standard declares that any operation that directly manipulates the sign bit is undefined behavior, since it won't work on a one's complement machine, or a sign-magnitude machine. – user3386109 Dec 3 '15 at 21:15
  • 1
    @JohnBollinger Yes, but the other branch of the if also does the same assignment, and the rest of the code only uses raw_signed, so the optimized assembly will not contain an explicit assignment. – user3386109 Dec 3 '15 at 21:17
  • 1
    @JohnBollinger: It will likely use the same register for both, not needing a move. Anyway, 1<<15 is already UB for 16 bit int (note the tags). No need to do further research what else could have gone wrong. – too honest for this site Dec 3 '15 at 21:19
12

Converting the 14 bit 2's complement value to 16 bit signed, while maintaining the value is simply a metter of:

int16_t accel = (int16_t)(raw << 2) / 4 ;

The left-shift pushes the sign bit into the 16 bit sign bit position, the divide by four restores the magnitude but maintains its sign. The divide avoids the implementation defined behaviour of an right-shift, but will normally result in a single arithmetic-shift-right on instruction sets that allow. The cast is necessary because raw << 2 is an int expression, and unless int is 16 bit, the divide will simply restore the original value.

It would be simpler however to just shift the accelerometer data left by two bits and treat it as if the sensor was 16 bit in the first place. Normalising everything to 16 bit has the benefit that the code needs no change if you use a sensor with any number of bits up-to 16. The magnitude will simply be four times greater, and the least significant two bits will be zero - no information is gained or lost, and the scaling is arbitrary in any case.

int16_t accel = raw << 2 ;

In both cases, if you want the unsigned magnitude then that is simply:

int32_t mag = (int32_t)labs( (int)accel ) ;
  • 1
    Before the UB police pipe up, I realise that strictly this is not guaranteed to work where 2's complement is not the signed encoding, but in the real world it works. In embedded systems you would expect to know how your hardware behaves and performance is often more critical than portability to some hypothetical machine. – Clifford Dec 3 '15 at 22:01
  • 2
    @chux : Thanks - fixed. Your two-step solution may be better for clarity. Personally I really wouldn't bother restoring to 14-bit magnitude scaling; it is an unnecessary step. – Clifford Dec 3 '15 at 22:06
  • A disadvantage of "... shift the accelerometer data left by two bits and treat it as if the sensor was 16 bit in the first place. " is with int16_t mag = abs( accel ) ; that may try to do abs(0x8000) – chux - Reinstate Monica Dec 3 '15 at 22:47
  • @chux : Thanks for the spot, changed to use labs() and int32_t, though abs() would still work on a 32 bit target. – Clifford Dec 4 '15 at 11:15
  • 1
    @Lundin : To ensure it is arithmetic, simply divide by 4. The compiler will almost certainly generate an arithmetic-shift operation if the instruction set allows. Edited accordingly. – Clifford Dec 4 '15 at 22:08
6

I would do simple arithmetic instead. The result is 14-bit signed, which is represented as a number from 0 to 2^14 - 1. Test if the number is 2^13 or above (signifying a negative) and then subtract 2^14.

int16_t fxls8471qr1_convert_raw_accel_to_mag(uint16_t raw, enum fxls8471qr1_fs_range range) 
{
  int16_t raw_signed = raw;
  if(raw_signed >= 1 << 13) {
    raw_signed -= 1 << 14;
  }

  uint16_t divisor;
  if(range == FXLS8471QR1_FS_RANGE_2G) {
    divisor = FS_DIV_2G;
  }
  else if(range == FXLS8471QR1_FS_RANGE_4G) {
    divisor = FS_DIV_4G;
  }
  else {
    divisor = FS_DIV_8G;
  }

  return ((int32_t)raw_signed * RAW_SCALE_FACTOR) / divisor;
}

Please check my arithmetic. (Do I have 13 and 14 correct?)

  • Thanks for this code, your arithmetic was correct. Just for the exercise I ended up using the code John provided above to understand the necessary manipulations / casts but this code was valid too (and produced much less head scratching)! – secretformula Dec 3 '15 at 21:29
  • 1
    This answer is optimal, as it does not depend on the native signed type being 2's compliment, nor does it depend on raw_signed being exactly 16 bit. – dbush Dec 3 '15 at 21:55
  • @secretformula Most programming time is spent maintaining and debugging code. Over the long run, it always pays off to avoid "head-scratching" type code! – UncleO Dec 3 '15 at 21:57
  • 2
    Well, politically optimal. – user3528438 Dec 3 '15 at 22:02
  • @dbush : It is "portable" not "optimal". Optimal usually implies highest possible performance, and code that accommodates hypothetical hardware rather then being tailored to the actual hardware is sub-optimal. This question is tagged embedded, so will be full of code specific to the target, so optimising this to the target would make sense. Moreover, where are these one's complement or sign+magnitude machines? For an optimal and portable solution, conditional compilation would be a better approach. – Clifford Dec 3 '15 at 22:19
1

Supposing that int in your particular C implementation is 16 bits wide, the expression (1 << 15), which you use in mangling raw, produces undefined behavior. In that case, the compiler is free to generate code to do pretty much anything -- or nothing -- if the branch of the conditional is taken wherein that expression is evaluated.

Also if int is 16 bits wide, then the expression -(~raw + 1) and all intermediate values will have type unsigned int == uint16_t. This is a result of "the usual arithmetic conversions", given that (16-bit) int cannot represent all values of type uint16_t. The result will have the high bit set and therefore be outside the range representable by type int, so assigning it to an lvalue of type int produces implementation-defined behavior. You'd have to consult your documentation to determine whether the behavior it defines is what you expected and wanted.

If you instead perform a 14-bit sign conversion, forcing the higher-order bits off ((~raw + 1) & 0x3fff) then the result -- the inverse of the desired negative value -- is representable by a 16-bit signed int, so an explicit conversion to int16_t is well-defined and preserves the (positive) value. The result you want is the inverse of that, which you can obtain simply by negating it. Overall:

raw_signed = -(int16_t)((~raw + 1) & 0x3fff);

Of course, if int were wider than 16 bits in your environment then I see no reason why your original code would not work as expected. That would not invalidate the expression above, however, which produces consistently-defined behavior regardless of the size of default int.

  • Thanks for helping me understand my error. I ended up going with Cliffords answer because it was more concise. Thank you again! – secretformula Dec 3 '15 at 22:38
  • Disagree with "Also if int is 16 bits wide...." paragraph. The -(~raw + 1) will all be done with 16-bit unsigned math. The result will be in the range of int, so no problem for not all 16-bit combinations are present in raw, just 2^14 of them. – chux - Reinstate Monica Dec 3 '15 at 22:43
1

Assuming when code reaches return ((int32_t)raw_signed ..., it has a value in the [-8192 ... +8191] range:

If RAW_SCALE_FACTOR is a multiple of 4 then a little savings can be had.

So rather than

int16_t raw_signed = raw << 2; 
raw_signed >>= 2;

instead

int16_t fxls8471qr1_convert_raw_accel_to_mag(uint16_t raw,enum fxls8471qr1_fs_range range){
  int16_t raw_signed = raw << 2;
  uint16_t divisor;
  ...
  // return ((int32_t)raw_signed * RAW_SCALE_FACTOR) / divisor;
  return ((int32_t)raw_signed * (RAW_SCALE_FACTOR/4)) / divisor;
}
0

To convert the 14-bit two's-complement into a signed value, you can flip the sign bit and subtract the offset:

int16_t raw_signed = (raw ^ 1 << 13) - (1 << 13);

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