I need an algorithm or function to map each wavelength of visible range of spectrum to its equivalent RGB values. Is there any structural relation between the RGB System and wavelength of a light? like this image: alt text http://www1.appstate.edu/~kms/classes/psy3203/Color/spectrum5.gif sorry if this was irrelevant :-]

  • 6
    This question may give you some insight. stackoverflow.com/questions/1472514/… – GWW Aug 4 '10 at 17:15
  • Spectral Colors and RGB colors have a inf-to-1 relation, so there is no unique relation. One RGB colour maps to infinitely many spectral colours. – Sebastian Mach Apr 4 '13 at 5:40
  • look here: stackoverflow.com/a/22149027/2521214 and yes this can be used only to wavelength -> RGB conversion not the other way around ... (wavelength has color but color is not wavelength ...) – Spektre Mar 4 '14 at 8:25
  • added mine new wavelength -> RGB conversion based on real linearized spectroscopy data – Spektre Mar 27 '14 at 8:04
up vote 8 down vote accepted

There is a relationship between frequency and what is known as Hue, but for complicated reasons of perception, monitor gamut, and calibration, the best you can achieve outside of expensive lab equipment is a gross approximation.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HSL_and_HSV for the math, and note that you'll have to come up with your best guess for the Hue ⇔ Frequency mapping. I expect this empirical mapping to be anything but linear.

  • the whole math for Hue -> RGB mapping is approximation (linear). Hue -> freq can be mapped as wavelength 390 to 750 nm maps to hue [0, 1]. freq = c / wavelength – Andrey Aug 4 '10 at 17:33
  • 7
    Note my use of the word "empirical" and then try it for yourself whilst remembering that our perception is trichromat and distinctly non-linear and that monitors are a different trichromatic and are also extremely non-linear. There is an entire calibration industry built around these effects. – msw Aug 4 '10 at 17:46
  • Hue is the angle around the white-black axis in the RGB cube. Sure there is some sort of relationship to wavelength, but it is more accidental than by design. Note that one sextant of this plane has colors that do not map to any wavelength at all. – Cris Luengo Mar 18 at 13:46

I recently found out that my spectral colors don't work properly because they were based on nonlinear and shifted data. So I did little research and data compilation and found out that most spectrum images out there are incorrect. Also, the color ranges do not match to each other, so I used from this point only linearized real spectroscopy data like this

Here is the rectified output of mine:

spectral colors

  • the first spectrum is the best rendered spectrum I found but still way off the real thing
  • the second one is linearized Spectrum of our Sun taken from Earth
  • the last one is my current color output

Below are the RGB graphs:

This is the merge of both graphs:

graph merge

Now the code:

void spectral_color(double &r,double &g,double &b,double l) // RGB <0,1> <- lambda l <400,700> [nm]
    {
    double t;  r=0.0; g=0.0; b=0.0;
         if ((l>=400.0)&&(l<410.0)) { t=(l-400.0)/(410.0-400.0); r=    +(0.33*t)-(0.20*t*t); }
    else if ((l>=410.0)&&(l<475.0)) { t=(l-410.0)/(475.0-410.0); r=0.14         -(0.13*t*t); }
    else if ((l>=545.0)&&(l<595.0)) { t=(l-545.0)/(595.0-545.0); r=    +(1.98*t)-(     t*t); }
    else if ((l>=595.0)&&(l<650.0)) { t=(l-595.0)/(650.0-595.0); r=0.98+(0.06*t)-(0.40*t*t); }
    else if ((l>=650.0)&&(l<700.0)) { t=(l-650.0)/(700.0-650.0); r=0.65-(0.84*t)+(0.20*t*t); }
         if ((l>=415.0)&&(l<475.0)) { t=(l-415.0)/(475.0-415.0); g=             +(0.80*t*t); }
    else if ((l>=475.0)&&(l<590.0)) { t=(l-475.0)/(590.0-475.0); g=0.8 +(0.76*t)-(0.80*t*t); }
    else if ((l>=585.0)&&(l<639.0)) { t=(l-585.0)/(639.0-585.0); g=0.84-(0.84*t)           ; }
         if ((l>=400.0)&&(l<475.0)) { t=(l-400.0)/(475.0-400.0); b=    +(2.20*t)-(1.50*t*t); }
    else if ((l>=475.0)&&(l<560.0)) { t=(l-475.0)/(560.0-475.0); b=0.7 -(     t)+(0.30*t*t); }
    }
//--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Where

  • l is the wavelength in [nm] usable valueas are l = < 400.0 , 700.0 >
  • r,g,b are returning color components in range < 0.0 , 1.0 >
  • @tivus no it is not an typo it should be 5.82 as it is in the code!!! otherwise the Green end of slope will overflow to negative values around 639 nm creating invalid color peak. – Spektre Jun 28 '14 at 6:28
  • couldn't this code be very simplified if you use functions to approximate the curves of each color band? One function that comes to mind that might be good is 1/sqrt(x^2+1), with each band getting the appropriate changes. – Broseph Jul 15 '14 at 22:09
  • @Broseph changing simple low order polynomial with 1/sqrt does not sound good to me(speed,accuracy) if you want speed or code simplicity use table + interpolation. – Spektre Jul 15 '14 at 23:48
  • Your 2nd else if for the green code, generates values WAY greater than 1. If t in this case is always less than 1, how can 5.82 - (something less than 1) ever equal something between 0 and 1??? I think you mean "0.82" not "5.82", YES I have tested :-) – trumpetlicks Jul 16 '14 at 15:27
  • 1
    @Ruslan also if you monitor uses different wavelengths for the RGB then all is screwed for good as you would need to do reintegration to X,Y,Z curves for those different wavelengthd to make it right again ... – Spektre Oct 27 '16 at 7:21

Partial "Approximate RGB values for Visible Wavelengths"

Credit: Dan Bruton - Color Science

Original FORTRAN code @ (http://www.physics.sfasu.edu/astro/color/spectra.html)

Will return smooth(continuous) spectrum, heavy on the red side.

w - wavelength, R, G and B - color components

Ignoring gamma and intensity simple leaves:

if w >= 380 and w < 440:
    R = -(w - 440.) / (440. - 380.)
    G = 0.0
    B = 1.0
elif w >= 440 and w < 490:
    R = 0.0
    G = (w - 440.) / (490. - 440.)
    B = 1.0
elif w >= 490 and w < 510:
    R = 0.0
    G = 1.0
    B = -(w - 510.) / (510. - 490.)
elif w >= 510 and w < 580:
    R = (w - 510.) / (580. - 510.)
    G = 1.0
    B = 0.0
elif w >= 580 and w < 645:
    R = 1.0
    G = -(w - 645.) / (645. - 580.)
    B = 0.0
elif w >= 645 and w <= 780:
    R = 1.0
    G = 0.0
    B = 0.0
else:
    R = 0.0
    G = 0.0
    B = 0.0
  • This would give 6 discrete RGB values. Anything for the in-between colours? – FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Aug 4 '10 at 17:13
  • @FrustratedWithFormsDesigner no, it is gradient. w is inside the expressions, so they are f(w) – Andrey Aug 4 '10 at 17:15
  • Aren't the R=-(w - 440.) / (440. - 350.) bits for the in-between values? R,G,B are floating-point here, not ints. – Rup Aug 4 '10 at 17:15
  • 1
    What's the source of the algorithm - your own from frequency tables for some colours or is this a standard computation? – Rup Aug 4 '10 at 17:16
  • @FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: there is not just five discrete values. (w stands for the wavelenght.) it sounds to work. i'll try it. – sorush-r Aug 4 '10 at 17:17

I think the answers fail to address a problem with the actual question.

RGB values are generally derived from the XYZ color space which is the combination of a standard human observer function, an illuminate and the relative power of the sample at each wavelength over the range of ~360-830.

I'm not sure of what you are trying to achieve here but it would be possible to calculate a relatively "accurate" RGB value for a sample where each discrete band of the spectrum @ say 10nm was fully saturated. The transform looks like this Spectrum ->XYZ->RGB. Check out Bruce Lindbloom's site for the math. From the XYZ you can also easily calculate hue, chroma or colorimetric values such as L*a*b*.

If you want an exact match then the only solution is to perform a convolution of the x,y,z color matching functions with your spectral values so you finally get a (device-independent) XYZ color representation that you can later convert into (device-dependent) RGB.

This is described here: http://www.cs.rit.edu/~ncs/color/t_spectr.html

You can find the x,y,z color matching function for convolution here: http://cvrl.ioo.ucl.ac.uk/cmfs.htm

This is most of what color profiles deal with. Basically, for a given device (scanner, camera, monitor, printer, etc.) a color profile tells what actual colors of light will be produced by a specific set of inputs.

Also note that for most real devices, you only deal with a few discrete wavelengths of light, and intermediate colors are produced not by producing that wavelength directly, but by mixing varying amounts of the two neighboring wavelengths that are available. Given that we perceive color in the same way, that's not really a problem, but depending on why you care, it may be worth knowing anyway.

Without a color profile (or equivalent information) you lack the information necessary to map RGB value to colors. An RGB value of pure red will normally map to the reddest color that device is capable of producing/sensing (and likewise, pure blue to the bluest color) -- but that "reddest" or "bluest" can and will vary (widely) based on the device.

To convert a wavelength into an RGB color

First you consult a CIE 1964 Supplementary Standard Colorimetric Observer chart (archive)

https://imgur.com/a/JDatZNm

and look up the CIE color matching function values for the wavelength you want.

For example, i want to get the color of 455 nm light:

enter image description here

For our desired wavelength:

| nm  | CIE color matching functions  |  Chromacity coordinates     |
| nm  |     X    |     Y    |    Z    |    x    |    y    |    z    |
|-----|----------|----------|---------|---------|---------|---------| 
| 455 | 0.342957 | 0.106256 | 1.90070 | 0.14594 | 0.04522 | 0.80884 |

Note: The chromacity coordinates are simply calculated from the CIE color matching functions:

x = X / (X+Y+Z)
y = Y / (X+Y+Z)
z = Z / (Z+Y+Z)

Given that:

X+Y+Z = 0.342257+0.106256+1.90070 = 2.349913

we calculate:

x = 0.342257 / 2.349913 = 0.145945
y = 0.106256 / 2.349913 = 0.045217
z = 1.900700 / 2.349913 = 0.808838

You have your 455 nm light specified using two different color spaces:

  • XYZ: (0.342957, 0.106256, 1.900700)
  • xyz: (0.145945, 0.045217, 0.808838)

We can also add a third color space: xyY

x = x = 0.145945
y = y = 0.045217
Y = y = 0.045217

We now have the 455 nm light specified in 3 different color spaces:

  • XYZ: (0.342957, 0.106256, 1.900700)
  • xyz: (0.145945, 0.045217, 0.808838)
  • xyY: (0.145945, 0.045217, 0.045217)

So we've converted a wavelength of pure monochromatic emitted light into a XYZ color. Now we want to convert that to RGB.

How to convert XYZ into RGB?

XYZ, xyz, and xyY are absolute color spaces that describe colors using absolute physics.

Meanwhile, every practical color spaces that people use:

  • Lab
  • Luv
  • HSV
  • HSL
  • RGB

depends some whitepoint. The colors are then described as being relative to that whitepoint.

For example,

  • RGB white (255,255,255) means "white"
  • Lab white (100, 0, 0) means "white"
  • LCH white (100, 0, 309) means "white"
  • HSL white (240, 0, 100) means "white"
  • HSV white (240, 0, 100) means "white"

But there is no such color as white. How do you define white? The color of sunlight?

  • at what time of day?
  • with how much cloud cover?
  • at what latitude?
  • on Earth?

Some people use the white of their (horribly orange) incandescent bulbs to mean white. Some people use the color of their florescent lights. There is no absolute physical definition of white - white is in our brains.

So we have to pick a white

We have to pick a white. (Really you have to pick a white.) And there are plenty of whites to choose from:

I will pick a white for you. The same white that sRGB uses:

  • D65 - daylight illumination of clear summer day in northern Europe

D65 (which has a color close to 6504K, but not quite because of the Earth's atmosphere), has a color of:

  • XYZ_D65: (0.95047, 1.00000, 1.08883)

With that, you can convert your XYZ into Lab (or Luv) - a color-space equally capable of expressing all theoretical colors. And now we have a 4th color space representation of our 445 nm monochromatic emission of light:

  • XYZ: (0.342957, 0.106256, 1.900700)
  • xyz: (0.145945, 0.045217, 0.808838)
  • xyY: (0.145945, 0.045217, 0.045217)
  • Lab: (38.94259, 119.14058, -146.08508) (assuming d65)

But you want RGB

Lab (and Luv) are color spaces that are relative to some white-point. Even though you were forced to pick an arbitrary white-point, you can still represent every possible color.

RGB is not like that. With RGB:

  • not only is the color relative to some white-point
  • but is is also relative to three primary colors: red, green, blue

If you specify an RGB color of (255, 0, 0), you are saying you want "just red". But there is no definition of red. There is no such thing as "red", "green", or "blue". The rainbow is continuous, and doesn't come with an arrow saying:

This is red

And again this means we have to pick three pick three primary colors. You have to pick your three primary colors to say what "red", "green", and "blue" are. And again you have many different defintions of Red,Green,Blue to choose from:

  • CIE 1931
  • ROMM RGB
  • Adobe Wide Gamut RGB
  • DCI-P3
  • NTSC (1953)
  • Apple RGB
  • sRGB
  • Japanese NTSC
  • PAL/SECAM
  • Adobe RGB 98
  • scRGB

I'll pick for you. I'll pick these three colors:

  • Red: xyY = (0.6400, 0.3300, 0.2126)
  • Green: xyY = (0.3000, 0.6000, 0.7152)
  • Blue: xyY = (0.1500, 0.0600, 0.0722)

Those were also the primaries chosen for by an international committee in 1996.

They created a standard that said everyone should use:

  • Whitepoint: D65 daylight
  • Red: (0.6400, 0.3300, 0.2126)
  • Green: (0.3000, 0.6000, 0.7152)
  • Blue: (0.1500, 0.0600, 0.0722)

And they called that standard sRGB.

The final push

Now that we have chosen our

  • white-point
  • three primaries

we can now convert you XYZ color into RGB:

  • RGB = (1.47450, -178.21694, 345.59392)

Unfortunately there are some problems with that RGB value:

  • your monitor cannot display negative green (-178.21694); that means it's a color outside what your monitor can display.
  • your monitor cannot display more blue than 255 (345.59392); the monitor only only be as blue as the blue is - it can't get any bluer. That means it's a color outside what your monitor can display.

So we have to round:

  • XYZ: (0.342957, 0.106256, 1.900700)
  • xyz: (0.145945, 0.045217, 0.808838)
  • xyY: (0.145945, 0.045217, 0.045217)
  • Lab: (38.94259, 119.14058, -146.08508) (d65)
  • RGB: (1, 0, 255) (sRGB)

And now we have the closest approximation sRGB of wavelength 455 nm of light:

enter image description here

  • Better to suggest the 1931 CIE 2° standard observer chart, as the governs the majority of RGB cases. See also, Colour-Science.org for the CMFS and a plethora of other useful functions. – troy_s Oct 23 at 6:09

Patapom has it almost right: for each wavelength you calculate the CIE XYZ values, then convert those to (say) sRGB using standard formulas (if you're lucky you'll find code you can just use to do this conversion). So the key step is getting the XYZ values. Fortunately, for single-wavelength light this is easy: the XYZ color matching functions are simply tables listing the XYZ values for a given wavelength. So just look it up. If you had light with a more complicated spectrum, maybe a black body, then you'd have to average the XYZ responses times the amount of each wavelength in the light.

VBA code is derived from Approximate "RGB values for Visible Wavelengths" by Dan Bruton (astro@tamu.edu). Link to his original Fortran code: http://www.physics.sfasu.edu/astro/color/spectra.html Spectra program: http://www.efg2.com/Lab/ScienceAndEngineering/Spectra.htm

Sub Wavelength_To_RGB()

'Purpose: Loop thru the wavelengths in the visible spectrum of light
'         and output the RGB values and colors to a worksheet.
'         Wavelength range: 380nm and 780nm

Dim j As Long, CellRow As Long
Dim R As Double, G As Double, B As Double
Dim iR As Integer, iG As Integer, iB As Integer
Dim WL As Double
Dim Gamma As Double
Dim SSS As Double


Gamma = 0.8
CellRow = 1

For j = 380 To 780

  WL = j

  Select Case WL

  Case 380 To 440
      R = -(WL - 440#) / (440# - 380#)
      G = 0#
      B = 1#
  Case 440 To 490
      R = 0#
      G = ((WL - 440#) / (490# - 440#))
      B = 1#
  Case 490 To 510
      R = 0#
      G = 1#
      B = (-(WL - 510#) / (510# - 490#))
  Case 510 To 580
      R = ((WL - 510#) / (580# - 510#))
      G = 1#
      B = 0#
  Case 580 To 645
      R = 1#
      G = (-(WL - 645#) / (645# - 580#))
      B = 0#
  Case 645 To 780
      R = 1#
      G = 0#
      B = 0#
  Case Else
      R = 0#
      G = 0#
      B = 0#
  End Select

  'LET THE INTENSITY SSS FALL OFF NEAR THE VISION LIMITS
  If WL > 700 Then
     SSS = 0.3 + 0.7 * (780# - WL) / (780# - 700#)
  ElseIf WL < 420 Then
     SSS = 0.3 + 0.7 * (WL - 380#) / (420# - 380#)
  Else
     SSS = 1#
  End If

  'GAMMA ADJUST
  R = (SSS * R) ^ Gamma
  G = (SSS * G) ^ Gamma
  B = (SSS * B) ^ Gamma

  'Multiply by 255
  R = R * 255
  G = G * 255
  B = B * 255

  'Change RGB data type from Double to Integer.
  iR = CInt(R)
  iG = CInt(G)
  iB = CInt(B)

  'Output to worksheet
  Cells(CellRow, 1).Interior.Color = RGB(iR, iG, iB)
  Cells(CellRow, 2) = WL
  Cells(CellRow, 3) = "(" & iR & "," & iG & "," & iB & ")"
  CellRow = CellRow + 1

Next j


End Sub

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.