3

I have a little CSS problem.

In my html I have something like this:

<div class='box-div'>
  <div>Entry 1</div>
  <div class='hide'>Entry 2</div>
</div>

In my CSS:

.box-div div {
  display: inline-block;
}

.hide {
  display: none;
}

I want the second nested div to be hidden, but the first rule overrides the second one. How can this be solved?

  • 1
    If absolutely necessary (and for a hide class that seems pretty necessary) you can always add !important to your style rule: display: none !important;. Watch out with them, as they complicate matters a lot if you rely on it. – somethinghere Dec 4 '15 at 12:13
  • 2
    Don't use !important ! – Christoph Dec 4 '15 at 12:15
  • 1
    @Christoph Why is everyone stubbornly saying that? Don't use !important unless the situation is right for it. By increasing specificity you lose the power of a class that is simply meant to hide everything that has it as a class, no matter what else. I know that you should avoid !important if you can but here it makes perfect sense. It is another tool in our toolbox that does have at least some use. – somethinghere Dec 4 '15 at 12:22
  • 1
    It can lead to complications though later on in the code. Much better to have your css formatted and written at the same level (this is much better practice). – lharby Dec 4 '15 at 12:33
  • 2
    @somethinghere Because i think it's not a good idea, tell css newcomers that they should use !important for this kind of problems. – Christoph Dec 4 '15 at 12:44
5

Increase the strength of yours to make it stronger than the previous rule:

.box-div .hide {
  display: none;
}

or

div.hide{
   display: none;
}
  • 1
    I guess this does defeat the purpose of having a general purpose hide class. – somethinghere Dec 4 '15 at 12:14
  • OP could have it named different, but in this case/question thats the only correct answer, increasing specifity – Mark Dec 4 '15 at 12:16
  • 2
    I don't like !important. !important is the root of all overtime. – AVAVT Dec 4 '15 at 12:17
  • 2
    @Mark for Fs sake, you seem intent on being right on an ideological basis right? This is exactly why !important exists. It is not to create headaches, but for a general purpose class like .hide it is usefull as I might want to use it on headers, images, divs, super deeply nested things, etc... The reason it is right here is that increasing specificity is stupid as if you want to hide anything on your site you will have to keep adding every element and give it a .hide class, and that's just working overtime to solve a problem that already has a solution. – somethinghere Dec 4 '15 at 12:19
  • Thank you guys I got it. – Dragos Dec 4 '15 at 12:22
3

There are different ways to do the same.

1

.box-div {
  display: inline-block;
}

.hide {
  display: none;
}

2

.box-div div{
  display: inline-block;
}

div.hide {
  display: none;
}

3

.box-div div{
  display: inline-block;
}

div.hide {
  display: none;
}

4

.box-div div {
    display: inline-block;
}

.hide {
    display: none !important;
}
2
.hide.hide  {
  display: none;
}

You can strengthen your specificity by repeating it :)

1

It's very easy

HTML:

<div class='box-div'>
  <div>Entry 1</div>
   <div class='hide'>Entry 2</div>
</div>

CSS:

.box-div div {
  display: inline-block;
}

.box-div > div.hide {
  display: none;
}

Try this.

1

Personally, using a single class of .hidden would be a good solution to hide an element on the page regardless of how it is nested. I would want this class to work anywhere.

So I think it might be better to create a class for dispaly:inline-block which can be reused.

You could specify that the first div inside .box-div always has inline-block as a property, but this is very restrictive.

My solution:

.ib {
  display: inline-block;
}

.hide {
  display: none;
}

<div class='box-div'>
  <div class="ib">Entry 1</div>
  <div class='hide'>Entry 2</div>
</div>
  • I agree but it does not solve the specificty issue. For example, if I have a div#myId { display: block; } but with your .hide class, the hide class would be surpressed by the higher specificity id definition. Thats actually literally the OPs problem. – somethinghere Dec 4 '15 at 12:47
  • But you do not need to declare display block for a block element. @somethinghere – lharby Dec 4 '15 at 14:08
  • @Iharby that's true, but it was an example, you could also decide you want an inline-block, and that you do need to declare. Then your rule breaks, which is exactly the issue the OP is having - his .hide class' display property is overwritten by a more specific definition. – somethinghere Dec 4 '15 at 14:10
  • In fairness I am trying to think about the way to do this with the least code and as semantically as possible. – lharby Dec 4 '15 at 14:10
  • 1
    I feel sorry for the OP now all these contrasting views :/ – lharby Dec 4 '15 at 14:12

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