4

I'd like to know all distinct extensions of files tracked by git in a given repo, in order to create appropriate .gitattributes file.

Example output expected:

bat
gitignore
gradle
html
jar
java
js
json
md
png
properties
py
svg
webp
xml
yml

What command can I use for that?

4
git ls-tree -r HEAD --name-only | perl -ne 'print $1 if m/\.([^.\/]+)$/' | sort -u 

When you declare it as an alias, you have to escape $1:

alias gitFileExtensions="git ls-tree -r HEAD --name-only | perl -ne 'print \$1 if m/\.([^.\/]+)$/' | sort -u"

This is better than naive find, because:

  • it excludes untracked (gitignored) files
  • it excludes .git directory which contains usually hundreds/thousands of files and hence slows down the search

(inspired by How can I find all of the distinct file extensions in a folder hierarchy?)

  • 1
    Any reason you used double quotes around the perl part? Also maybe it'd be worth using a hash rather than piping to sort - you could add && !$a{$1}++ (with single quotes around the whole command) to only print the first occurrence of each result. – Tom Fenech Dec 4 '15 at 14:36
  • If I use single quotes, it prints SCALAR(0xa031e3c)SCALAR(0xa031e3c).... I have to remove the escape before $1 for it to work back. But then when I declare an alias, I have to add the escape back. Updated. – jakub.g Dec 4 '15 at 15:23
  • Yeah, $ needs escaping from the shell inside double quotes. Better to just use a function in my opinion. – Tom Fenech Dec 4 '15 at 15:28
  • ad !$a{$1}++ I tested on a huge git repo (Chrome's blink) and the speed difference is negligible in practice (0.8s vs 1.0s on my machine). I think I'll leave sort for readability :) – jakub.g Dec 4 '15 at 15:34

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