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It seems like there are eight variants of binary search (given a sorted list in ascending order):

  1. Largest number less than target (but leftmost of duplicates)

  2. Largest number less than target (but rightmost of duplicates)

  3. Largest number less than or equal to target (but leftmost of duplicates)

  4. Largest number less than or equal to target (but rightmost of duplicates)

  5. Smallest number greater than target (but leftmost of duplicates)

  6. Smallest number greater than target (but rightmost of duplicates)

  7. Smallest number greater than or equal to target (but leftmost of duplicates)

  8. Smallest number greater than or equal to target (but rightmost of duplicates)

How do I know how to correctly and logically set up the correct type of binary search for these? Every time I try, it seems like the logic tends to fail when lists get really small or when weird edge cases show up, which makes me think that I am going about the logic incorrectly.

Is there a better way to think about this kind of problem logically so that binary search can be set up better?

You always hear about how a high percentage of programmers can't code binary search correctly but then I'm not at all surprised to find that there's no exhaustive literature on how to correctly set up these 8 cases.

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    As you can see from the list, there are only 2 things that can differ: how you compare numbers (<, <=, >, >=) and which one of the duplicates you choose (first,last). Your implementation needs to reflect these two decisions and you should be fine. – biziclop Dec 4 '15 at 15:39
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    What does "smallest of duplicates" mean? Left-est? Top-est? – AakashM Dec 4 '15 at 15:39
  • @AakashM I'd assume OP meant to say first/last of the duplicates. – biziclop Dec 4 '15 at 15:39
  • @biziclop Yes, first vs. last. I'll try to change that – The 29th Saltshaker Dec 4 '15 at 15:40
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    @biziclop Depending on the variant, sometimes I see people change bounds with mid-1 or mid+1, but sometimes just mid. Sometimes I see people return lo, but sometimes hi, and sometimes mid. Sometimes I see people take a midrange with (lo+hi)/2, but sometimes (lo+hi+1)/2. There are so many inconsistencies and confusing versions of the same code. I just want to better understand the core logic so I can get a consistent framework that will work across all variants. – The 29th Saltshaker Dec 4 '15 at 15:44
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The mental model I use for binary search is the following: Let's assume we have a monotonically increasing function f: [a, b] -> {0,1} and we want to find the smallest number i from [a, b] with f(i) = 1, or b if no such number exists. The following algorithm will compute that result:

lo = a, hi = b
while lo < hi:
    # invariant: lo <= i <= hi
    mid = (lo + hi)/2  # or lo + (hi - lo) / 2 to avoid overflows
    if f(mid): 
        hi = mid
    else: 
        lo = mid + 1

In the end, lo = hi = i.

Interestingly, this code will never examine f(b), so it's fine if f is only defined on [a,b-1]. If f(b-1) = 0, then the code will report b as the answer. You can cover all the cases you mentioned using this, by just using the correct function f. For example:

(7) Smallest number greater than or equal to target (but leftmost of duplicates)

Let's say you have an array of size n.

Use a = 0, b = n, f(i) = array[i] >= target

(1) Largest number less than target (but rightmost of duplicates)

Use a = -1, b = n - 1, f(i) = (array[i+1] >= target).

Or alternatively, use solution for (7) and subtract 1. It should be clear that we just shifted everything by 1 here.

(2) Largest number less than target (but leftmost of duplicates)

This requires two searches if I'm not mistaken. You can use the solution for case (1) (say index i) and then use a = 0, b = i, f(j) = array[j] == array[i] to find the leftmost duplicate.

etc.

I don't think I ever made a mistake with binary search since I've started using this pattern.

  • So you never do hi = mid-1, which is something I see in a lot of code, correct? Are you saying n is the size of the list, or the size-1 (index of last item)? – The 29th Saltshaker Dec 4 '15 at 16:13
  • @user54089 I rephrased the question to make this more clear. The snippet hi = mid - 1 is usually used together with mid = (lo + hi + 1)/2, to find the last i with f(i) = 0. But that's the same problem as finding the first i with f(i+1) = 1, like in the first example. You just have to shift your bounds by 1 as well. – Niklas B. Dec 4 '15 at 16:22
  • What about this idea (trying to understand): If a search returns the leftmost index of duplicates, then is it valid to instead search for target+1 instead and then subtract 1 from that index? Does this kind of logic work for all cases? – The 29th Saltshaker Dec 4 '15 at 17:59
  • That depends. If you're searching for the first element with a certain property, then in the case of equal elements you obviously get the leftmost one. Getting the rightmost one requires a second search I feel like. The reverse applies to the case where you are looking for the last element with some property (as in my example) – Niklas B. Dec 4 '15 at 19:02

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