10

I am using Dynamic Linq to perform some queries (sorry but it's my only option). As a result, I am getting an IQueryable instead of an IQueryable<T>. In my case, I want an IQueryable<Thing> where Thing is a concrete type.

My query is as such:

public IQueryable<Thing> Foo(MyContext db)
{
    var rootQuery = db.People.Where(x => x.City != null && x.State != null);
    var groupedQuery = rootQuery.GroupBy("new ( it.City, it.State )", "it", new []{"City", "State"});
    var finalLogicalQuery = groupedQuery.Select("new ( Count() as TotalNumber, Key.City as City, Key.State as State )");
    var executionDeferredResults = finalLogicalQuery.Take(10); // IQueryable

    IQueryable<Thing> executionDeferredTypedThings = ??; // <--- Help here!!!!

    return executionDeferredTypedThings;
}

My Thing.cs:

public class Thing
{
    public int TotalNumber { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
}

Yes, I know the exact above thing can be done without Dynamic Linq but I have some variableness going on that I've simplified out of here. I can get it to work with my variableness if my return type is simply IQueryable but I can't figure out how to convert to IQueryable<Thing> while keeping it execution-deferred and while also keeping Entity Framework happy. I do have the dynamic Select always returning something (with the correct data) that looks like a Thing. But I simply can't figure how to return the IQueryable<Thing> and could use some help there. Thanks!!

Failed Attempt 1

Based on Rex M's suggestion, I am now trying to use AutoMapper to solve this problem (although I am not committed to this approach and am willing to try other approaches). For the AutoMapper approach, I am doing it as such:

IQueryable<Thing> executionDeferredTypedThings = executionDeferredResults.ProjectTo<Thing>(); // <--- Help here!!!!

But this results in an InvalidOperationException:

Missing map from DynamicClass2 to Thing. Create using Mapper.CreateMap.

The thing is, while I have defined Thing, I have not defined DynamicClass2 and as such, I cannot map it.

Failed Attempt 2

IQueryable<Thing> executionDeferredTypedThings = db.People.Provider.CreateQuery<Thing>(executionDeferredResults.Expression);

This gives an InvalidCastException and seems to be the same underlying problem that the above AutoMapper fail hits:

Unable to cast object of type 'System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.DbQuery'1[DynamicClass2]' to type 'System.Linq.IQueryable'1[MyDtos.Thing]'.

  • Does DLinq let you project a strongly typed object? .Take(10).Select(x => new Thing() { })? Sorry, I haven't used it before. – kamranicus Dec 8 '15 at 20:31
  • If so, I'm not sure how to do this. Especially in my case where I conditionally want it to either be set to a default (null or 0 in most cases) unless it's a column I'm grouping by. So a pseudocode of that would look something like this: .Take(10).Select(x => new Thing{City = Key.City ?? null)), if that makes sense. I don't think that's really the right path to take for this because I'm doing conditional grouping. – Jaxidian Dec 8 '15 at 20:34
  • By the way, have you tried IQueryable.Cast ? – hazimdikenli Dec 9 '15 at 15:16
  • @hazimdikenli: That gives me an InvalidOperationException: Unable to cast the type 'DynamicClass2' to type 'MyDtos.Thing'. LINQ to Entities only supports casting EDM primitive or enumeration types. – Jaxidian Dec 9 '15 at 16:31
  • Do you really need all this? I mean, you are not receiving the information as strings, right? From what you wrote, I assume you build GroupBy and Select strings dynamically from something else just to let Dynamic Linq do the plumbing part. But all that have an overhead, so I'm wondering if some strongly typed group/select helpers wouldn't do that better. – Ivan Stoev Dec 11 '15 at 19:51
1
+100

If I understand correctly, the following extension method should do the job for you

public static class DynamicQueryableEx
{
    public static IQueryable<TResult> Select<TResult>(this IQueryable source, string selector, params object[] values)
    {
        if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
        if (selector == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("selector");
        var dynamicLambda = System.Linq.Dynamic.DynamicExpression.ParseLambda(source.ElementType, null, selector, values);
        var memberInit = dynamicLambda.Body as MemberInitExpression;
        if (memberInit == null) throw new NotSupportedException();
        var resultType = typeof(TResult);
        var bindings = memberInit.Bindings.Cast<MemberAssignment>()
            .Select(mb => Expression.Bind(
                (MemberInfo)resultType.GetProperty(mb.Member.Name) ?? resultType.GetField(mb.Member.Name),
                mb.Expression));
        var body = Expression.MemberInit(Expression.New(resultType), bindings);
        var lambda = Expression.Lambda(body, dynamicLambda.Parameters);
        return source.Provider.CreateQuery<TResult>(
            Expression.Call(
                typeof(Queryable), "Select",
                new Type[] { source.ElementType, lambda.Body.Type },
                source.Expression, Expression.Quote(lambda)));
    }
}

(Side note: Frankly I have no idea what values argument is for, but added it to match the corresponding DynamicQueryable.Select method signature.)

So your example will become something like this

public IQueryable<Thing> Foo(MyContext db)
{
    var rootQuery = db.People.Where(x => x.City != null && x.State != null);
    var groupedQuery = rootQuery.GroupBy("new ( it.City, it.State )", "it", new []{"City", "State"});
    var finalLogicalQuery = groupedQuery.Select<Thing>("new ( Count() as TotalNumber, Key.City as City, Key.State as State )");  // IQueryable<Thing>
    var executionDeferredTypedThings = finalLogicalQuery.Take(10);
    return executionDeferredTypedThings;
}

How it works

The idea is quite simple.

The Select method implementation inside the DynamicQueryable looks something like this

public static IQueryable Select(this IQueryable source, string selector, params object[] values)
{
    if (source == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (selector == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("selector");
    LambdaExpression lambda = DynamicExpression.ParseLambda(source.ElementType, null, selector, values);
    return source.Provider.CreateQuery(
        Expression.Call(
            typeof(Queryable), "Select",
            new Type[] { source.ElementType, lambda.Body.Type },
            source.Expression, Expression.Quote(lambda)));
}

What it does is to dynamically create a selector expression and bind it to the source Select method. We take exactly the same approach, but after modifying the selector expression created by the DynamicExpression.ParseLambda call.

The only requirement is that the projection is using "new (...)" syntax and the names and types of the projected properties match, which I think fits in your use case.

The returned expression is something like this

(source) => new TargetClass
{
    TargetProperty1 = Expression1(source),
    TargetProperty2 = Expression2(source),
    ...
}

where TargetClass is a dynamically generated class.

All we want is to keep the source part and just replace that target class/properties with the desired class/properties.

As for the implementation, first the property assignments are converted with

var bindings = memberInit.Bindings.Cast<MemberAssignment>()
    .Select(mb => Expression.Bind(
        (MemberInfo)resultType.GetProperty(mb.Member.Name) ?? resultType.GetField(mb.Member.Name),
        mb.Expression));

and then the new DynamicClassXXX { ... } is replaced with with

var body = Expression.MemberInit(Expression.New(resultType), bindings);
| improve this answer | |
  • I'm just looking at this from my phone right now but will that complex Select statement work with Entity Framework in the database? Either way I'll get to try this tomorrow when I get to my workstation. – Jaxidian Dec 13 '15 at 6:19
  • @Jaxidian I believe so. Basically this is the code of the Dynamic Linq Select implementation with few lines added to replace some parts of the generated new { .. }. – Ivan Stoev Dec 13 '15 at 6:52
  • Initial tests are good! I'm handing this off to another developer to further verify this for me. I hope to close this here in a few hours. – Jaxidian Dec 14 '15 at 15:56
  • This solution ended up being exactly what was needed! We were able to adopt this code to work perfectly with what we needed to do. Thanks a ton, Ivan!! – Jaxidian Dec 14 '15 at 20:25
  • 1
    I just wanted to follow-up and say that this solution has worked very well for us. I had to tweak a few things for our purposes but I would have never gotten there without your help. Thanks again!! – Jaxidian Mar 14 '16 at 11:48
4

You can use AutoMapper's Queryable Extensions to produce an IQueryable which wraps the underlying IQueryable, thus preserving the original IQueryable's IQueryProvider and the deferred execution, but adds in a mapping/translating component to the pipeline to convert from one type to another.

There's also AutoMapper's UseAsDataSource which makes some common query extension scenarios easier.

| improve this answer | |
  • I see how to do this when both the source and destination classes are concrete classes. I'm not sure how to do this, though, when my Dynamic Linq is providing an unknown (to me) class type. If I try it with no mapping, I get the missing map error, as expected. The exact message: Missing map from DynamicClass2 to Thing. Create using Mapper.CreateMap<DynamicClass2, Thing>. While Thing is defined by me, the DynamicClass2 class is not something I define nor can I reference. They should both have the same properties but I don't know how to map that. – Jaxidian Dec 7 '15 at 15:37
  • I was never able to find a way to utilize AutoMapper to perform this translation successfully. – Jaxidian Dec 15 '15 at 16:16
0

Would something like this be of benefit to you?

public static IQueryable<TEntity> GetQuery<TEntity>(this DbContext db, bool includeReferences = false) where TEntity : class
    {
        try
        {
            if (db == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            var key = typeof(TEntity).Name;
            var metaWorkspace = db.ToObjectContext().MetadataWorkspace;
            var workspaceItems = metaWorkspace.GetItems<EntityType>(DataSpace.OSpace);
            var workspaceItem = workspaceItems.First(f => f.FullName.Contains(key));
            var navProperties = workspaceItem.NavigationProperties;

            return !includeReferences
                    ? db.Set<TEntity>()
                    : navProperties.Aggregate((IQueryable<TEntity>)db.Set<TEntity>(), (current, navProperty) => current.Include(navProperty.Name));
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Invalid Entity Type supplied for Lookup", ex);
        }
    }

You may want to take a look into the Generic Search project on Github located here: https://github.com/danielpalme/GenericSearch

| improve this answer | |
  • I'm afraid I don't understand what you're suggesting I do with this. There's no obvious way I see to utilize this code to help me. – Jaxidian Dec 10 '15 at 18:33
  • The Github project I mentioned uses custom expression trees and generics to query data and then generate search filters/paging/etc, The custom expression trees and generics will allow you to utilize the entity framework models and DbContexts in a generic sense without requiring knowledge of the schema beforehand. This would eliminate a need for dynamic linq and would allow you to use linq expressions and generics to query your data without a third party solution – Anthony Hart Dec 11 '15 at 1:31
  • Instead of using db.People.Whatever . . . you could use db.GetQuery<YourModel>() and use lambda expressions – Anthony Hart Dec 11 '15 at 1:34
  • I cannot use Generics because of my dynamic grouping. Sometimes I group by just City. Sometimes just State. Sometimes by LastName. Sometimes by Age. Sometimes by some of the above. Sometimes by all of the above. And more. The moment I start using generics in my expression trees, is either the moment dynamic grouping does not work or is the moment that I have to have 250 different conditional statements building each one up. As I mentioned in my question, my code is more complex than above. The above code is just a simplified reproduction of the problem. – Jaxidian Dec 11 '15 at 12:35
-1

There is no need for Dynamic Linq on this one.

var groupedQuery = from p in db.People
    where p.City != null && p.State != null
    group p by new {p.City, p.State}
    into gp
    select new Thing {
        TotalNumber = gp.Count(),
        City = gp.Key.City,
        State = gp.Key.State
    };

IQueryable<Thing> retQuery = groupedQuery.AsQueryable(); 
retQuery= retQuery.Take(10);
return retQuery;
| improve this answer | |
  • This is standard Linq To Entities. You do not need to use Dynamic Linq. If you need to apply a filter to people data set before taking the sum/count, you can pass that in as an Expression, and apply it in your query. – hazimdikenli Dec 9 '15 at 14:57
  • As I said in the original post, I have simplified some stuff out. I do need Dynamic Linq because I have a changing set of columns that I'm grouping by. I have ~25 different columns and if I don't use Dynamic Linq then I have to have some kind of conditional logic handling all possible combinations. That's a lot! And not an option. – Jaxidian Dec 9 '15 at 16:29

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