0

I have been trying to figure out this problem for a day or so, and I'm a bit confused with what's going on.

Essentially I have this method in order to convert a BGR Integer to RGB and create a Color out of it

      Color c2 = new Color((BGRColorNumber & 0xFF),
    ((BGRColorNumber >> 8) & 0xFF),
    ((BGRColorNumber >> 16) & 0xFF));

The color codes can be found here http://www.endprod.com/colors/

This works perfectly, but I am now trying to do this as an RGBA integer instead of RGB. I'm a bit confused exactly how Alpha fits into an RGB integer. It seems that if you have just RGB or BGR or whatever you can just make alpha 1.0/255 it seems, or is there more to it than that?

Here is the code I have been working with

public class test 
{

public static void main (String[] args)

{

    test t = new test();


    System.out.println(t.asIntRGBA(4823790));

}

    public int asIntRGBA(int BGRColorNumber)
{



    int rgba = 
              (((int) (BGRColorNumber         & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 16)
            | (((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 8)  & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 8 )
            | (((int) (BGRColorNumber >> 16)  & 0xFF) & 0xFF)
            | (((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 24) & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 24);

    Color c = new Color(rgba);

  Color c2 = new Color((BGRColorNumber & 0xFF),
    ((BGRColorNumber >> 8) & 0xFF),
    ((BGRColorNumber >> 16) & 0xFF));


  Color c3 = new Color(15637065);
  System.out.println((((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 24) & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 24) + " : " + c.getAlpha());
    System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c.getRed(), c.getGreen(), c.getBlue(), c.getAlpha()));
    System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c2.getRed(), c2.getGreen(), c2.getBlue(), c2.getAlpha()));
      System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c3.getRed(), c3.getGreen(), c3.getBlue(), c3.getAlpha()));
    return (rgba);
}

}

Here is my output

0 : 255

"#ee9a49ff"

"#ee9a49ff"

"#ee9a49ff"

15637065

So it works if I convert it to a color, and then output RGBA, but I figured why waste an Object creation and then getting the values when I can just do the colorInteger and Bitwise shift operation itself?

When doing the operation on the Alpha channel, it gives me 00/0, but when using Color.getAlpha(); I'm given ff/255....?

I also am not 100% sure what the << # is for, but it seems that you place the values of >> # into << #. So if I'm getting for blue that's in the red spot, and putting it into the blue spot, the same goes for the red.

In this case it seems that Alpha is in the highest position of 24, so I'm assuming this is initially ABGR????

When I switch to

        int rgba = 
              (((int) (BGRColorNumber         & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 24)
            | (((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 8)  & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 16)
            | (((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 16)  & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 8)
            | (((int)  (BGRColorNumber >> 24) & 0xFF) & 0xFF);

System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c.getRed(), c.getGreen(), c.getBlue(), c.getAlpha()));

my output for this is "#9a4900ff" instead of "#ee9a49ff"

However if I do

System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x",  ((rgba >> 24) & 0xFF),  ((rgba >> 16) & 0xFF),  ((rgba >> 8) & 0xFF), ((rgba >> 0) & 0xFF)));

I get "#ee9a4900" which is basically normal, except for the 00 bug with the Alpha, except it's bugging out trf now....??????? 00 instead of ee and Alpha is ff now instead of 00?

So I'm confused what exactly I'm doing wrong...? Any advice is appreciated!

Thanks!


EDIT: I realized that maybe it is because there is only RGB places from 0 to 16, and 24 itself doesn't exist which is why I'm getting 00 for anything that I'm shifting into the 24 with "<<24?"

Maybe I'll just put a 255/ff into the Alpha spot of 24 and call it a day. If the value is being 00, then I just need to make it not be that :).

I still do not understand why Color.getAlpha() returned ff, and not 00 though...?


EDIT 2:

So I ended up figuring out the issue.

Essentially I didn't have anything in position 24, and only 0-23 was being used up. This meant I was given a 0 for the value of the last 8 24-31.

I also realized the reason the color was giving me ff/255 for Alpha, was because I had not told the Color I had an Alpha value, thus it was giving it the default of ff/255.

By doing Color c = new Color (#, true);

I was able to turn on the Alpha value.

Here is how I solved my problem.

public class test 

{

public static void main (String[] args)
{

    test t = new test();


    System.out.println(t.asIntRGBA(4823790));

}

    public int asIntRGBA(int BGRColorNumber)
{



    int rgba = 
              (((int) (BGRColorNumber         & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 24)
            | (((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 8)  & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 16 )
            | (((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 16)  & 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 8)
            | ((int) (252 & 0xFF) & 0xFF);

    Color c = new Color(rgba, true);
   // Color c3 = Color.TRANSLUCENT;

  Color c2 = new Color((BGRColorNumber & 0xFF),
    ((BGRColorNumber >> 8) & 0xFF),
    ((BGRColorNumber >> 16) & 0xFF), 252);


  Color c3 = new Color(-51471799, true);
  System.out.println(((rgba >> 24) & 0xFF) + " | " +  c.getRed() +  " | " + c.getGreen() + " | " + c.getBlue() + " | " + c.getAlpha());
  //System.out.println(();
    System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x",((rgba >> 24) & 0xFF), ((rgba >> 16) & 0xFF), ((rgba >> 8) & 0xFF), ((rgba) & 0xFF)));
    System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c2.getRed(), c2.getGreen(), c2.getBlue(), c2.getAlpha()));
      System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c3.getRed(), c3.getGreen(), c3.getBlue(), c3.getAlpha()));
    return (rgba);
}

}

I changed getting a value with >> 24 to just putting a value (in this case 252), to test. Technically they will all be 255.

This gives me the correct values and corresponds to the correct Hex value according to the above page..

However I am having an issue with

  System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c.getRed(), c.getGreen(), c.getBlue(), c.getAlpha()));

being correct

Correct output:

"#ee9a49fc"

Color's output:

"#9a49fcee"

if I take the int value I got from rgba "-291878404" and plugged it into Color c3, I get the same values as Color c. I'm not sure what is wrong, but I am having an issue getting everything to be the same.

rgba

0

So I had a bit of trouble, but I ended up figuring out the issue.

Essentially I can only use Bits 0-23 since Bits 24-31 haven't been given any data.

So first I have to add Alpha to bits 24-31, and then I have to bit-shift everything into proper RGBA order, from ARGB.

If I tried to shift everything into RGBA order I would have issues since there was nothing in 24, and for some reason the shifting operations didn't like what was going on, so I just do the integer Operation twice.

public class test {

public static void main (String[] args) {

    test t = new test();


    t.asIntRGBA(4823790);

}

public int asIntRGBA(int BGRColorNumber)
{

    /*  
     *  First set of bit-wise shifts take the BGR value and swaps it into RGB values:
     *  Bits 24-31 - Alpha (Added in through this operation)
     *  Bits 16-23 - Red  (Originally Bits 0-7)
     *  Bits  8-15 - Green
     *  Bits   0-7 - Blue (Originally Bits 16-23)
     *  
     *  Seeing as we want Red as 24-31, and Alpha as 0-7, we need to do another bit-wise routine.
     *  We first have to add bit data to 24-31, before being able to shift it around.
     *  If you try to shift bits over in one routine it causes jumbling of bit data that isn't correct.
     *
     */

    /* 

    *  The Bit-Wise shift of (value >> #) is taking the value at Bit #.

    *  While the Bit-Wise sift of (x << #) takes the data of x, and puts it into Bit #.

    */

    int rgba = (((int) ((BGRColorNumber      )& 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 16)
            | (((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 8 )& 0xFF) & 0xFF) << 8)
            | (((int) ((BGRColorNumber >> 16)& 0xFF) & 0xFF)    )
            | (((int) (25 & 0xFF) << 24));



   /*Once an Alpha value is stored in 24-31, you can now swap everything where they should be.

    * Since blue and red were swapped we now use (>> 16, not (>> 0/blank)).
    * As you can see we also swapped (<< 16 for << 24),
    * since now we are taking the value in Bits 16-23
    *                 and shifting them to Bits 24-31.

    * After this Bit-Wise shift we now have    

    *  Bits 24-31 - Red   (Originally Bits 16-23)
    *  Bits 16-23 - Green (Originally Bits 8-15)
    *  Bits  8-15 - Blue  (Originally Bits 0-7)
    *  Bits   0-7 - Alpha (Originally Bits 24-31)

    */
    int rgba2 = (((int) (rgba >> 16) & 0xFF) << 24)
            | (((int) (rgba >> 8 ) & 0xFF) << 16)
            | (((int) (rgba      ) & 0xFF) << 8)
            | (((int) (rgba >> 24) & 0xFF));



    Color c = new Color(rgba, true);

    Color c2 = new Color((BGRColorNumber & 0xFF),
                        ((BGRColorNumber >> 8) & 0xFF),
                        ((BGRColorNumber >> 16) & 0xFF), 252);


    Color c3 = new Color(435067465, true);
    System.out.println(rgba);
    System.out.println(((rgba2 >> 24) & 0xFF) + " | " +  c.getRed() +  " | " + c.getGreen() + " | " + c.getBlue() + " | " + c.getAlpha());
  //System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x%02x",((rgba >> 24) & 0xFF), c.getRed(), c.getGreen(), c.getBlue(), c.getAlpha()));


  //System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x",((rgba >> 24) & 0xFF), ((rgba >> 16) & 0xFF), ((rgba >> 8) & 0xFF), ((rgba) & 0xFF)));
   //System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c2.getRed(), c2.getGreen(), c2.getBlue(), c2.getAlpha()));
    System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x",((rgba >> 16) & 0xFF), ((rgba >> 8) & 0xFF), ((rgba >> 0) & 0xFF), ((rgba >> 24 ) & 0xFF)));
    System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x",((rgba2 >> 24) & 0xFF), ((rgba2 >> 16) & 0xFF), ((rgba2 >> 8) & 0xFF), ((rgba2 >> 0 ) & 0xFF)));
    System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c.getRed(), c.getGreen(), c.getBlue(), c.getAlpha()));
    System.out.println(String.format("#%02x%02x%02x%02x", c3.getRed(), c3.getGreen(), c3.getBlue(), c3.getAlpha()));

    return (rgba);
}

}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.