5

I have the following code that attempts to populate a Map from a List in a parallel fashion by going through the Java Stream API:

class NameId {...}

public class TestStream
{
    static public void main(String[] args)
    {
        List<NameId > niList = new ArrayList<>();
        niList.add(new NameId ("Alice", "123456"));
        niList.add(new NameId ("Bob", "223456"));
        niList.add(new NameId ("Carl", "323456"));

        Stream<NameId> niStream = niList.parallelStream();
        Map<String, String> niMap = niStream.collect(Collectors.toMap(NameId::getName, NameId::getId));
    }
}

How do I know if the map is populated using multiple threads, i.e. in parallel? Do I need to call Collectors.toConcurrentMap instead of Collectors.toMap? Is this a reasonable way to parallelize the population of a map? How do I know what the concrete map is backing the new niMap (e.g. is it HashMap)?

  • n being the number of core your processor have, n-1 thread will be created to operate on your parallel stream. You have 3 rows in your list so you'll most likely decrease performance. – Jean-François Savard Dec 5 '15 at 0:20
  • The streams framework deliberately hides the implementation (parallel or not) from you. If everything is done correctly, there will be no way to tell. – Louis Wasserman Dec 5 '15 at 0:28
2

From the Javadoc:

The returned Collector is not concurrent. For parallel stream pipelines, the combiner function operates by merging the keys from one map into another, which can be an expensive operation. If it is not required that results are inserted into the Map in encounter order, using toConcurrentMap(Function, Function) may offer better parallel performance.

So it sounds like toConcurrentMap will parallelize the inserts.

The backing map is, by default, a HashMap. It just calls the version of toMap which takes a Supplier<M> and passes HashMap::new. (source: the source)

2

How do I know if the map is populated using multiple threads, i.e. in parallel?

It is hard to tell. If your code is going surprisingly slowly it could be because you are trying to use multiple threads.

Do I need to call Collectors.toConcurrentMap instead of Collectors.toMap?

This would help make the parallel more efficient or put another way, a little less inefficient.

Is this a reasonable way to parallelize the population of a map?

You can do it as you suggest however you should note that the cost of starting a new thread is far more expensive than everything you are doing here so adding even one thread will slow it down a lot.

How do I know what the concrete map is backing the new niMap (e.g. is it HashMap)?

The documentation says you can't know for sure. The last time I checked toMap was using HashMap and groupingBy used LinkedHashMap but you can't assume it is any particular Map.

  • Wouldn't niMap.getClass tell you which Map is used ? – Jean-François Savard Dec 5 '15 at 0:16
  • 1
    @Jean-FrançoisSavard Yes, but it could be a different implementation between updates of Java or in theory depending on how you called it. i.e. if you pass no objects an emptyMap(), or one it could be a singletonMap() You can't even assume it's mutable. – Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '15 at 0:17
  • When groupingBy used LinkedHashMap? I never saw this. – Tagir Valeev Dec 6 '15 at 11:18
  • I only saw this recently myself. – Peter Lawrey Dec 6 '15 at 22:02
1

You can use both toConcurrentMap for sequential stream and toMap for parallel stream. The difference is

  • toConcurrentMap() is usually faster for parallel stream than for sequential stream
  • toMap() is usually faster for sequential stream than for parallel stream

If you don't know where your stream came from and want to make it faster in both cases, you may write like this:

Map<String, String> niMap = niStream.collect(
    niStream.isParallel() ? 
        Collectors.toConcurrentMap(NameId::getName, NameId::getId) :
        Collectors.toMap(NameId::getName, NameId::getId)
);

The difference is that toConcurrentMap() is a CONCURRENT collector which means that the concurrent data structure is used (ConcurrentHashMap in current implementation) which can be populated simultaneously from different threads. For sequential stream this adds some unnecessary overhead, but for parallel stream it's faster than using toMap() as in toMap() case separate non-concurrent Map instances will be created for every parallel thread, then these Maps are merged together which is not very fast for large maps.

Note that my StreamEx library which enhances standard Stream API adds a toMap() method which uses concurrent collection for parallel stream and non-concurrent collection for the sequential one:

Map<String, String> niMap = StreamEx.of(niStream)
                      .toMap(NameId::getName, NameId::getId);

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