1

I tried using the .split function with null values to keep the array 20 big.

I should see:

String[] N = new String[20];
String M = "hello world tHIS is random 123123 text";
    N = M.split("\\s+", -1);
System.out.println(Arrays.asList(N));

With the output:

"hello, world, tHIS, is, random, 123123, text, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null"

But instead I get:

"hello world tHIS is random 123123 text"

How do I keep the array as 20 regardless of how long the M value is?

2
  • Iterate over and use substring. Or store them in a temp variable. – Emz Dec 5 '15 at 17:51
  • Is the -1 necessary? – OneCricketeer Dec 5 '15 at 17:55
0

You can just use the Arrays.copyOf method and set the length to 20. As the JavaDoc says its padding the array with nulls, just as you need it:

int length = 20;
String[] N = new String[length];
String M = "hello world tHIS is random 123123 text";
N = Arrays.copyOf(M.split("\\s+", -1), length);
System.out.println(Arrays.asList(N));

Output:

[hello, world, tHIS, is, random, 123123, text, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null]

1
  • could save 20 as a variable, then use it twice – OneCricketeer Dec 5 '15 at 17:56
0

You are reassigning N to M. If you want to keep all the null values, you'll need to save the split string separately and loop over it to assign each index to N.

0

The .split methods creates a new array with the exact length, and you save its reference. You should resize the resulting array instead. (It does not really resize the array, but creates a copy of it with the correct length, and saves it into the same variable as before):

String M = "hello world tHIS is random 123123 text";
String[] N = M.split("\\s+", -1);
N = Arrays.copyOf(N, 20);
System.out.println(Arrays.asList(N));
0

You can use a StringTokenizer for this purpose :

StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(M);
for (int i = 0; i < N.length && st.hasMoreTokens(); ++i) {
    N[i] = st.nextToken();
}

Although the the documentation says :

StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code

It seems to be a good match for your use case as you avoid copying the result of split.

2
  • The StringTokenizer documentation says that it is a legacy class whose use is discouraged in new code. – RealSkeptic Dec 5 '15 at 18:02
  • @RealSkeptic yes it does. I have commented on that on my answer. Since it doesn't say "forbidden" and it happens to be good for this particular case, it is worth considering. – Manos Nikolaidis Dec 5 '15 at 18:04

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