1

I tried using the .split function with null values to keep the array 20 big.

I should see:

String[] N = new String[20];
String M = "hello world tHIS is random 123123 text";
    N = M.split("\\s+", -1);
System.out.println(Arrays.asList(N));

With the output:

"hello, world, tHIS, is, random, 123123, text, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null"

But instead I get:

"hello world tHIS is random 123123 text"

How do I keep the array as 20 regardless of how long the M value is?

2
  • Iterate over and use substring. Or store them in a temp variable.
    – Emz
    Dec 5, 2015 at 17:51
  • Is the -1 necessary? Dec 5, 2015 at 17:55

4 Answers 4

0

You can just use the Arrays.copyOf method and set the length to 20. As the JavaDoc says its padding the array with nulls, just as you need it:

int length = 20;
String[] N = new String[length];
String M = "hello world tHIS is random 123123 text";
N = Arrays.copyOf(M.split("\\s+", -1), length);
System.out.println(Arrays.asList(N));

Output:

[hello, world, tHIS, is, random, 123123, text, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null]

1
  • could save 20 as a variable, then use it twice Dec 5, 2015 at 17:56
0

You are reassigning N to M. If you want to keep all the null values, you'll need to save the split string separately and loop over it to assign each index to N.

0

The .split methods creates a new array with the exact length, and you save its reference. You should resize the resulting array instead. (It does not really resize the array, but creates a copy of it with the correct length, and saves it into the same variable as before):

String M = "hello world tHIS is random 123123 text";
String[] N = M.split("\\s+", -1);
N = Arrays.copyOf(N, 20);
System.out.println(Arrays.asList(N));
0

You can use a StringTokenizer for this purpose :

StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(M);
for (int i = 0; i < N.length && st.hasMoreTokens(); ++i) {
    N[i] = st.nextToken();
}

Although the the documentation says :

StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code

It seems to be a good match for your use case as you avoid copying the result of split.

2
  • The StringTokenizer documentation says that it is a legacy class whose use is discouraged in new code. Dec 5, 2015 at 18:02
  • @RealSkeptic yes it does. I have commented on that on my answer. Since it doesn't say "forbidden" and it happens to be good for this particular case, it is worth considering. Dec 5, 2015 at 18:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.