-1

I'm new in Perl. I want to calculate days (e.g. 5 days) after input.

Steps I need to cover:
1. start_date: 08.12.2015
2. add 5 days
3. end date: ?

My idea is to convert the start date into a timestamp. Then I add 5*84.400 seconds. After that, I want to re-convert the end timestamp.

I read the Time::Local module docs, but I did not understand the logic yet.

Is this the right way to handle date calculations?

4
  • 1
    Not every day has 84,400 seconds.
    – ikegami
    Dec 7, 2015 at 0:24
  • For my calcs - 84.4K is ok
    – ClubCola
    Dec 7, 2015 at 7:10
  • You're OK with getting an answer that's not even the right date? Odd, and hardly the case for everyone reading these questions and answers.
    – ikegami
    Dec 7, 2015 at 8:48
  • Most days have rather more than 84,400 seconds :-)
    – Dave Cross
    Dec 7, 2015 at 10:34

3 Answers 3

5

You can do it using DateTime and DateTime::Format::Strptime. Like this:

use strict;
use DateTime;
use DateTime::Format::Strptime;

my $strp = DateTime::Format::Strptime->new(
    pattern => '%d.%m.%Y'
);

my $date = '08.12.2015';
my $dt = $strp->parse_datetime($date);
printf "%s -> %s\n", $date, $dt->add(days => 5)->strftime("%d.%m.%Y");
2
  • 1
    It works for me. Tx for the edit and the code. You just made my day!
    – ClubCola
    Dec 6, 2015 at 22:20
  • No problem. I guess that's why this site was made for - developers making each others' day :D Dec 6, 2015 at 22:24
4

Using Time::Piece

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use v5.10;

use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;

my $date_string = '08.12.2015';
my $date_format = '%m.%d.%Y';

my $tp = Time::Piece->strptime( $date_string, $date_format );

$tp += 5 * ONE_DAY;

say $tp->strftime($date_format);

Outputs:

08.17.2015
1
  • Works also for me. Tx to you
    – ClubCola
    Dec 6, 2015 at 22:26
0

Or another way, in vanilla perl (no use of packages needed), with help from Unix date:

$ date -d 08/12/2015
Wed, Aug 12, 2015 12:00:00 AM

$ date -d 08/12/2015 +%s
1439352000

$ date -d 08/12/2015 +%s|perl -ne 'print scalar localtime $_ + 5*24*60*60'
Mon Aug 17 00:00:00 2015
1
  • Not every day has 24*60*60 seconds. This won't always give the right answer.
    – ikegami
    Dec 7, 2015 at 0:25

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