5

We are using Solr to store documents with keywords; each keyword is associated with a span within the document.

The keywords were produced by some fancy analytics and/or manual work prior to loading them into Solr. A keyword can be repeated multiple times in a document. On the other hand, different instances of the same string in a single document can be connected with different keywords.

For example, this document

Bill studied The Bill of Rights last summer.

could be accompanied by the following keywords (with offsets in parentheses):

William Brown (0:4)
legal term (13:31)  
summer 2011 (32:43)

(Obviously in other documents, Bill could refer to Bill Clinton or Bill Gates. Similarly, last summer will refer to different years in different documents. We do have all this information for all the documents.)

I know the document can have a field, say KEYWORD, which will store William Brown. Then when I search for William Brown I will get the above document. That part is easy.

But I have no idea how to store the info that William Brown corresponds to the text span 0:4 so I can highlight the first Bill, but not the second.

I thought I could use TermVectors, but I am not sure if/how I can store custom offsets. I would think this is a fairly common scenario ...

EDIT: edited to make clear that Bill can refer to different people/things in different documents.

EDIT2: edited to make clear that a document can contain homonyms (identical strings with different meanings).

3
+50

Two Q Monte

Solution Pros:

  • Annotations logically stored with source docs
  • No knowledge of highlighter implementation or custom Java highlighter development required
  • Since all customization happens outside of Solr, this solution should be forward-compatible to future Solr versions.

Solution Cons:

  • Requires two queries to be run
  • Requires code in your search client to merge results from one query into the other.

With Solr 4.8+ you can nest child documents (annotations) underneath each primary document (text)...

curl http://localhost:8983/solr/update/json?softCommit=true -H 'Content-type:application/json' -d '
[
  {
    "id": "123",
    "text" : "Bill studied The Bill of Rights last summer.",
    "content_type": "source",
    "_childDocuments_": [
      {
        "id": "123-1",
        "content_type": "source_annotation",
        "annotation": "William Brown",
        "start_offset": 0,
        "end_offset": 4
      },
      {
        "id": "123-2",
        "content_type": "source_annotation",
        "annotation": "legal term",
        "start_offset": 13,
        "end_offset": 31
      },
      {
        "id": "123-3",
        "content_type": "source_annotation",
        "annotation": "summer 2011",
        "start_offset": 32,
        "end_offset": 43
      }
    ]
  }
]

... using block join to query the annotations.

1) Annotation Query: http://localhost:8983/solr/query?fl=id,start_offset,end_offset&q={!child of=content_type:source}annotation:"William Brown"

"response":{"numFound":1,"start":0,
    "docs":[
      {
            "id": "123-1",
            "content_type": "source_annotation",
            "annotation": "William Brown",
            "start_offset": 0,
            "end_offset": 4
      }
    ]
  }

Store these results in your code so that you can fold in the annotation offsets after the next query returns.

2) Source Query + Highlighting: http://localhost:8983/solr/query?hl=true&hl.fl=text&fq=content_type:source&q=text:"William Brown" OR id:123

(id:123 discovered in Annotation Query gets ORed into second query)

"response":{"numFound":1,"start":0,
    "docs":[
      {
            "id": "123",
            "content_type": "source",
            "text": "Bill studied The Bill of Rights last summer."
      }
    ],
    "highlighting":{}
  }

Note: In this example there is no highlighting information returned because the search terms didn't match any content_type:source documents. However we have the explicit annotations and offsets from the first query!

Your client code then needs to take the content_type:source_annotation results from the first query and manually insert highlighting markers into the content_type:source results from the second query.


More block join info on Yonik's blog here.

  • Does it make sense (to speedup queries) to add the raw keywords to the documents directly as well? For example, [ { "id": "123", "text" : "Bill studied The Bill of Rights last summer.", "keywords" : ["William Brown", "legal term", "summer 2011"], "content_type": "source", "_childDocuments_": [...] } ] Then search by keywords but request child document info once highlighting? – Jirka Dec 17 '15 at 14:41
  • Of course, you don't need to use block join... You could simply have annotations as a separate type or index. But having both parent (source) and child (source_annotation) in a "block" enables more sophisticated queries while minimizing network overhead in a clustered environment. – Peter Dixon-Moses Dec 17 '15 at 14:42
  • So I would use the keywords field when I need fast simple queries (say to display suggestions in the search box etc). The more sophisticated queries (incl. those when I need to do highlighting) I would do join. – Jirka Dec 17 '15 at 14:48
  • One more thing: why do you call it Two Q Monte ? – Jirka Dec 17 '15 at 14:49
  • No reason other than the two queries involved. – Peter Dixon-Moses Dec 17 '15 at 14:50
3

By default Solr stores the start/end position of each token once is tokenized, for instance using the StandardTokenizer. This info is encoded on the underline index. The use case that you described here sounds a lot like the SynonymFilterFactory.

When you define a synonym using the SynonymFilterFactory stating for instance that: foo => baz foo is equivalent to bar, the bar term is added to the token stream generated when the text is tokenized, and it will have the same offset information than the original token. So for instance if your text is: "foo is awesome", the term foo will have the following offset information (start=0,end=3) a new token bar(start=0,end=3) will be added to your index (assuming that you're using the SynonymFilterFactory at index time):

   text:   foo    is    awesome
   start:  0      4     7
   end:    3      6     13

Once the SynonymFilterFactory is applied:

           bar
   text:   foo    is    awesome
   start:  0      4     7
   end:    3      6     13

So if you fire a query using foo, the document will match, but if you use bar as your query the document will also match since a bar token is added by the SynonymFilterFactory

In your particular case, you're trying to accomplish multi-term synonyms, which is kind of a difficult problem, you may need something more than the default synonym filter of Solr. Check this post from the guys at OpenSourceConnections and this other post from Lucidworks (the company behind Solr/Lucene). This two posts should provide additional information and the caveats of each approach.

Do you need to fetch the stored offsets for some later processing?

  • I thought synonyms are stable for all documents. But things like Bill will refer to different people in different document (similarly yesterday, etc).. – Jirka Dec 11 '15 at 16:03
  • How would you differentiate between several occurrences of Bill in the same doc or in different documents for that matter? – Jorge Luis Dec 11 '15 at 21:46
  • That information is produced by an analysis module processing the documents prior loading them into Solr. So if the document is Bill studied The Bill of Rights, it is accompanied with this metadata [William Brown (0:4), legal term (13:21) ]. And we do not want to highlight the latter Bill when searching for William Brown. – Jirka Dec 12 '15 at 10:30
  • I think that encoding your "term-synonym" as a payload attached to the actual term (and hence that inherits the offset information) and a custom highlighter could be the way to go. Basically you index your document with the term and the "synonym" as payload: Bill[William Brown] studied The Bill of Rights, the custom highlighter checks if the payload is present and use it instead of the original term (to highlight). A custom synonym implementation could work and add the synonym just to the term with the payload instead of all occurrences of the word solving the search problem. – Jorge Luis Dec 14 '15 at 9:38

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