55

While solving some programming puzzle, I wanted to see how long it took me to write a solution to the problem. To do so, I thought it'd be a good idea to compare the file creation date with the latest modification date.

In the terminal (OSX), I tried the following command and was surprised to see the same date three times in a row:

stat my_file.py
16777220 10280844 -rw-r--r-- 1 username staff 0 7214 \
"Dec  5 08:32:39 2015"  \
"Dec  5 08:32:39 2015"  \
"Dec  5 08:32:39 2015"  \
"Dec  5 08:32:39 2015" 4096 16 0 my_file.py

The way I created then modified the file:

touch my_file.py
vim my_file.py   # <- modify some content
stat my_file.py

Any idea on how to get these two dates from the command line?

Clarification: I do not want to time the execution time of the script.

EDIT : The issue was with vim changing the creation date on save, the accepted answer still answers the question in depth for those who are interested.

5
  • If you want to time a command then why not time command?
    – trojanfoe
    Dec 6, 2015 at 21:41
  • That's not what the question is about. I'm trying to get the creation and last modification date of the script. Not measure the execution time.
    – Mr_Pouet
    Dec 6, 2015 at 21:44
  • ... in order to "see how long it took me to solve the problem".
    – trojanfoe
    Dec 6, 2015 at 21:45
  • ^ Changed to "how long it took me to write a solution to the problem".
    – Mr_Pouet
    Dec 6, 2015 at 21:46
  • @Mr_Pouet Is this what you want?: stat -f "%B %N" my_file.py and stat -c "%y %N" my_file.py ?
    – P.P
    Dec 6, 2015 at 21:48

2 Answers 2

80

stat reports the standard Unix dates, last access time, last modification time, and inode change time (which is often mistaken for creation time). Mac OS X also maintains the file creation time, and it's accessible using the GetFileInfo command:

$ GetFileInfo -d .bash_profile
10/08/2015 09:26:35

Here's a more complete example:

$ ls -l my_file.py
ls: my_file.py: No such file or directory
$ touch my_file.py
$ stat -x my_file.py
  File: "my_file.py"
  Size: 0            FileType: Regular File
  Mode: (0644/-rw-r--r--)         Uid: (  501/     blm)  Gid: (   20/   staff)
Device: 1,5   Inode: 26863832    Links: 1
Access: Sun Dec  6 13:47:24 2015
Modify: Sun Dec  6 13:47:24 2015
Change: Sun Dec  6 13:47:24 2015
$ GetFileInfo my_file.py
file: "/Users/blm/my_file.py"
type: "\0\0\0\0"
creator: "\0\0\0\0"
attributes: avbstclinmedz
created: 12/06/2015 13:47:24
modified: 12/06/2015 13:47:24
$ echo hello >my_file.py
$ stat -x my_file.py
  File: "my_file.py"
  Size: 6            FileType: Regular File
  Mode: (0644/-rw-r--r--)         Uid: (  501/     blm)  Gid: (   20/   staff)
Device: 1,5   Inode: 26863832    Links: 1
Access: Sun Dec  6 13:47:24 2015
Modify: Sun Dec  6 13:47:35 2015
Change: Sun Dec  6 13:47:35 2015
$ GetFileInfo my_file.py
file: "/Users/blm/my_file.py"
type: "\0\0\0\0"
creator: "\0\0\0\0"
attributes: avbstclinmedz
created: 12/06/2015 13:47:24
modified: 12/06/2015 13:47:35
$ cat my_file.py
hello
$ stat -x my_file.py
  File: "my_file.py"
  Size: 6            FileType: Regular File
  Mode: (0644/-rw-r--r--)         Uid: (  501/     blm)  Gid: (   20/   staff)
Device: 1,5   Inode: 26863832    Links: 1
Access: Sun Dec  6 13:47:54 2015
Modify: Sun Dec  6 13:47:35 2015
Change: Sun Dec  6 13:47:35 2015
$ GetFileInfo my_file.py
file: "/Users/blm/my_file.py"
type: "\0\0\0\0"
creator: "\0\0\0\0"
attributes: avbstclinmedz
created: 12/06/2015 13:47:24
modified: 12/06/2015 13:47:35

Note that using vim to test this may be misleading because vim will write your modified file to a new temporary file, then rename the old one and the new one, so the creation time will be updated to when the file was written. See this post for a workaround I came up with for that.

7
  • 3
    Oh that's totally why... you are right! vim was the culprit... Thanks :)
    – Mr_Pouet
    Dec 6, 2015 at 21:53
  • @Volomike So they removed it then put it back? I've got Snow Leopard (10.6) and Yosemite (10.10) machines and it's available on both of those (you may have to have Xcode installed for it to be available, I can't remember for sure and don't have any systems where I don't have Xcode installed :-) ).
    – blm
    Jun 15, 2016 at 17:29
  • 3
    Apparently GetFileInfo ist deprecated since Xcode 6. At least, man GetFileInfo says so and also the Xcode release notes (search for 'GetFileInfo' on the page). Couldn't find out if there's any replacement, though, and it still works in Sierra. Sep 17, 2017 at 11:04
  • 3
    @anothernode I think mdls is the replacement, although it seems to consult the metadata store, not the file itself, so if the metadata store is out of sync or hasn't picked up changes to the file yet, it seems like it may give incorrect results.
    – blm
    Sep 17, 2017 at 16:43
  • 7
    Actually stat on Mac OSX can show the Creation/Birth time. You just can't use stat -x. Plain old stat <file> will show 4 dates in one line: atime, mtime, ctime, Btime. Or you can do prettier formatting, see stackoverflow.com/a/47343029
    – wisbucky
    Nov 17, 2017 at 3:58
41

As you already identified, the real culprit was that vim resets all 4 datetime stamps.

But to answer your original question, here is a stat formatting for Mac OSX that will clearly show the 4 datetime stamps (including Creation/Birth and Modify):

# Access (atime)
stat -f "%Sa" file.txt
# Modify (mtime)
stat -f "%Sm" file.txt
# Change (ctime)
stat -f "%Sc" file.txt
# Birth  (Btime)
stat -f "%SB" file.txt

All together in one command:

stat -f "Access (atime): %Sa%nModify (mtime): %Sm%nChange (ctime): %Sc%nBirth  (Btime): %SB" file.txt
    
Access (atime): Nov 16 19:44:55 2017
Modify (mtime): Nov 16 19:44:25 2017
Change (ctime): Nov 16 19:44:48 2017
Birth  (Btime): Nov 16 19:44:05 2017
3
  • 4
    stat -f "%SB" file.txt will show the file's birth time. You are really cool.
    – DawnSong
    Jun 13, 2018 at 3:34
  • So I think insert alias btime='stat -f "%SB"' into ~/.bash_profile will simplify your answer a lot.
    – DawnSong
    Jun 13, 2018 at 3:38
  • 3
    stat -f %B file.txt will show the file's birth time as a Unix Timestamp (epoch). This also works for all files & directories within a single directory by using an asterisk file/directory/*
    – sudo soul
    Jul 13, 2020 at 0:38

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