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void operation2(char **p, int n, char *sir) {
    int i, move, k, xlen, ylen;
    char *x, *y, *q, separatori[] = " \'\",!?";
    x = strtok(sir, " ");
    y = strtok(NULL, " ");
    xlen = strlen(x);
    ylen = strlen(y);
    move = ylen - xlen;
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        k = 0;
        while (strstr(p[i] + k, x)) {
            q = strstr(p[i] + k, x);
            if ((strchr(separatori, *(q - 1)) || q == p[i]) &&
                (*(q + xlen) == '\0' || strchr(separatori, *(q + xlen)))) {
                if (move > 0 && k == 0)
                    p[i] = realloc(p[i], (strlen(p[i]) + move * counter(p[i], x) + 1) * sizeof(char));
                q = strstr(p[i] + k, x);
                memmove(q + xlen + move, q + xlen, strlen(q + xlen) + 1);
                memcpy(q, y, ylen);
                k = strlen(p[i]) - strlen(q) + ylen;
                if (move < 0)
                    p[i] = realloc(p[i], (strlen(p[i]) + move + 1) * sizeof(char));
            } else
                k = k + xlen;
        }
        puts(p[i]);
    }
}

The code aims to find and replace a word (x) with a second one (y) in a text dynamically allocated in **p. They come in a string (sir) and are separated. move stores the difference between the words that are obtained. n represents the number of lines in the text.

The word x must not be within another word hence the need to check for the separators.

If the conditions are met then the string is reallocated depending if the move is positive or negative. If it's positive the string will be longer and can be reallocated for all the apparitions of the word x inside of it. counter is a function that counts the apparitions in the string. When move is negative the string must be diminished so the reallocation is done after the operations take place.

The replace is done with memmove and memcpy.

k is the position after the apparitions of x.

During a test there was the need to replace "o" with "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA".

This is the reference Reference

And this is what I get Result

When replacing "o" in the middle of the string an error occurs and the pointer to the next line is lost, pointing to the ending part of the previous line. The 1 represents the value of the counter for the line that follows

Does realloc use memory that was already allocated and by doing so the next pointer is lost?

EDIT: Here is the allocation of the array:

int n, i;
scanf("%d", &n);
char **p, *aux;
p = malloc(n * sizeof(char *));
aux = malloc(12000 * sizeof(char));
getchar();
for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    fgets(aux, 12000, stdin);
    p[i] = malloc((strlen(aux) + 1) * sizeof(char));
    strcpy(p[i], aux);
    p[i][strlen(p[i]) - 1] = '\0';
}
free(aux);
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  • 2
    Ugh.. I would have used a char-by-char state machine instead of those nasty library calls. It would then be possible to debug it without nightmares. – Martin James Dec 7 '15 at 23:15
  • 1
    It does not look like the null character is accounted for in allocation nor copying. – chux - Reinstate Monica Dec 7 '15 at 23:16
  • 1
    I mean, 'if((strchr(separatori,*(q - 1)) || q == p[i]) && (*(q + strlen(x)) == '\0' || strchr(separatori, *(q + strlen(x)))))' takes too much mental effort to untangle and verify:( – Martin James Dec 7 '15 at 23:16
  • 1
    There a re LOT of strlen(x) calls:( – Martin James Dec 7 '15 at 23:17
  • 1
    @MartinJames But q, p, and x are self-explanatory! It could probably be deciphered in less than an hour. – Millie Smith Dec 7 '15 at 23:20
2

Your code is very confusing because of too many side effects, redundant calls to strlen...

The main issue is you do not allocate enough space for your strings: you forget the extra byte needed for the '\0' terminator.

You make this mistake in the main routine when you parse the file.

You make it again when you reallocate the line.

You also forget to include the null byte when you memmove the contents of the line.

Fix these issues first. There might be other ones, but you need to simplify your code to see them. Read all the comments, there are many hints.

EDIT: You fixed your code in place, which may confuse other readers of this question, but you still have a mistake in the second call to realloc:

p[i] = realloc(p[i], (strlen(p[i]) + move + 1) * sizeof(char));

is incorrect because you already shortened the line, therefore strlen(p[i]) is the new length. Simply write:

p[i] = realloc(p[i], strlen(p[i]) + 1);

EDIT: Here is simpler version of operation2 with fixes for most remarks in comments. I am not using count because since you did not post the code, I cannot assert that is does the right thing.

void operation2(char **p, int n, char *sir) {
    int i, move, k, xlen, ylen;
    static const char separatori[] = " \'\",!?";
    char *x, *y, *q;

    x = strtok(sir, " ");
    y = strtok(NULL, " ");
    xlen = strlen(x);
    ylen = strlen(y);
    move = ylen - xlen;
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        k = 0;
        while ((q = strstr(p[i] + k, x)) != NULL) {
            k = q - p[i];
            if ((q == p[i] || strchr(separatori, q[-1])) &&
                (q[xlen] == '\0' || strchr(separatori, q[xlen]))) {
                if (move > 0) {
                    p[i] = realloc(p[i], strlen(p[i]) + move + 1);
                    q = p[i] + k;
                }
                memmove(q + ylen, q + xlen, strlen(q + xlen) + 1);
                memcpy(q, y, ylen);
                k += ylen;
                if (move < 0) {
                    p[i] = realloc(p[i], strlen(p[i]) + 1);
                }
            } else {
                k += xlen;
            }
        }
        puts(p[i]);
    }
}
4
  • I removed the strlen calls for x and y. Also allocated the extra byte for '\0' in malloc and realloc. The effect still persist. This error did not happen if the replacement took place at the beginning of the line. As it can be seen in the pictures – Barbu Tudor Dec 7 '15 at 23:46
  • @BarbuTudor: There might be a bug in the count function. I posted a simpler version of operation2(). Check if this fixes the problem. – chqrlie Dec 8 '15 at 10:07
  • Seems this solved the problem. Could it have been the fact that I didn't use { } for the if branches? Or what do you suppose that caused the error? – Barbu Tudor Dec 8 '15 at 20:55
  • @BarbuTudor: as I wrote in my answer, I suspect there is a bug in the count function. The braces do not seem at fault here. – chqrlie Dec 8 '15 at 21:30
0

As far as the C Standard is concerned, the behavior of realloc in all cases where it succeeds is equivalent to copying the memory block to some arbitrary location, calling free upon it, calling malloc to create a new block of the requested size, and returning a pointer to the new block (in cases where the malloc wouldn't succeed, realloc is defined to return null without disturbing the original block). While many compilers usefully allowed a pointer to the old block to be compared with the new one, and would regard the difference between two pointers to the same object as being immutable and observable forever even after the lifetime of the object in question, the C Standard provides no means of querying whether a particular compiler supports such useful extensions.

As a result, if one wants code to be compatible with aggressive compilers, one must refrain from having any pointers point within an object which is going to be realloc'ed unless one can guarantee that such pointers will never even be examined after a successful realloc takes place.

3
  • Everything you write is true, but is not relevant here: the OP does not keep pointers in the reallocated block. He recomputes q from p[i] for each iteration. – chqrlie Dec 7 '15 at 23:22
  • @chqrlie: I see my point of confusion; I thought some pointers into the p[i] string were used afterward; q isn't, but I'm not quite clear what's going on with x and y. – supercat Dec 7 '15 at 23:28
  • x and y are the word to search for and the word to replace with. They are fragments of the sir argument which gets modified by strtok. This is very cumbersome, like the rest of this function. – chqrlie Dec 7 '15 at 23:33

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