I am putting together an Rmarkdown PDF document with the following YAML settings:

---
output: 
  pdf_document:
    fig_caption: true 
    fig_crop: true
    toc_depth: 3
  header-includes:
  - \usepackage{hyperref}
 ---

Within the body of the document I've inserted a few PNG images, using the following syntax

Paragraph 1..........

![Caption](path/image.png)

Paragraph 2....

And when the document is rendered, the image appears as expected within the text, between Paragraph 1 and Paragraph 2. However, I am getting some unpredictable results where the rendered image appears after Paragraph 2 in some cases and I can't manage to solve it.

When tackling similar issues, I've used \FloatBarrier (from the placeins package) to control positioning. I'm not the most experienced knitr rmarkdown LaTeX user, but I've had success with that before.

Basically, the images "float"; you can control what the can't float past by inserting a barrier. That description is crude, but you might find the technique effective.

  • 1
    \FloatBarrier is correct to confine floating, but I don't think it's what the OP is looking for. He expects the figure not to float at all. Unfortunately, this is not possible when writing RMD, see this answer by Yihui. Moreover, you should add that \FloatBarrier requires the placeins package. – CL. Dec 8 '15 at 9:29
  • @user2706569, So, at least the way I envisioned the solution, what I've asked is not possible? – Ryan Erwin Dec 8 '15 at 17:41
  • Well, you can use \FloatBarrier after the image which prevents the figure from appearing after the barrier. However, the "clean LaTeX" solution would be to use the H position from the float package. But this is not possible when writing markdown. Why do you write markdown when you want PDF output? Quoting Yihu (link above): "If you choose Markdown for its simplicity, you should not expect too much power from it, even with powerful tools like pandoc. Bottom line: Markdown is not LaTeX. It was designed for HTML instead of LaTeX." – CL. Dec 8 '15 at 17:47
  • You use it because you're writing R code, and want to create a dynamic report. Right? Like I said in answer, I'm no expert in any of these things; I just happened to have resolved a similar issue for myself. In my mind, "why don't you just write it in LaTeX?" is a pretty intense request. Notice the difference between what you're asking "why use markdown when you want pdf?" and what @YiHui is suggesting "don't expect much". That difference is huge, and key. – rbatt Dec 9 '15 at 6:36
  • @user2706569 see above (sorry for double comment) – rbatt Dec 9 '15 at 6:41

I have run into the same problem. It appears if you wrap the image in "paragraph" tags, the image will be in-line with the text.

Paragraph 1...

<p>
![](image.png)
</p>

Paragraph 2...
  • This might work for HTML output but won't for PDF. – user3603486 Apr 24 at 10:52
  • It does work for PDF. I was knitting to pdf and I got the correct result after adding the <p> tag. – troh Apr 24 at 13:40
  • Hmm... well, maybe something weird is happening in pandoc. But <p> is HTML, not TeX, so this is a pretty odd hack. – user3603486 Apr 25 at 10:01
  • It is strange, but I can confirm it works – obewanjacobi Nov 9 at 21:05

One option is to add

\newpage

to act in a similar way as the Floatbarrier. It is not to elegant but seems to work.

For greater clarity consider the example from above:

Paragraph 1..........

![Caption](path/image.png)

Paragraph 2....

To avoid the image to move in front of the second paragraph, you could do the following:

Paragraph 1..........

![Caption](path/image.png)

\newpage

Paragraph 2....
  • Can you provide an example of how to use newpage with the code example provided in the question? – Tom Aranda Dec 4 '17 at 22:38

There is no correct answer to this.

  1. Try adding fig.show='hold' to keep your images where they should be
  2. The paragraphs might be skipped because Latex will try and fit the text/images with least space.

I sorted my issue out using (1) and to "work with" (2), you can use \pagebreak in an appropriate position depending on what is before and after paragraphs 1 and 2.

This can be done only after seeing the pdf result, by better fitting of the image in question into potentially a next page (more space). Of course, it would also mean adding the page break elsewhere (e.g before or after any of the p1, p2 or the image).

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.