9

Consider the following code on a one's complement architecture:

int zero = 0;
int negzero = -0;
std::cout<<(negzero < zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(negzero <= zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(negzero == zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(~negzero)<<(~zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(1 << negzero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(1 >> negzero)<<std::endl;
  • What output would the code produce?
  • What lines are defined by the standard, what lines are implementation dependent, and what lines are undefined behaviour?
  • I believe that there's no reason for compiler to generate anything other that 0 when you do "-0". Can't speak for all compilers and standards, but if you look at the assembly which GCC and Clang generate, negzero variable is 0, so you can do pretty much do everything you can do with zero variable. See for yourself: goo.gl/bMiUUs – Elias Daler Dec 8 '15 at 6:22
  • @EliasDaler It should probably not be compiler dependent, rather architecture dependent. Your example is for a architecture that uses 2-complement which hasn't distinct negative zero. For architecture that has it's makes perfect sense to actually generate negative zeros if the language permits. – skyking Dec 8 '15 at 7:19
  • 1
    You example has to use ints? Because probably all of us have a one's complement architecture when we talk about floating point with our IEEE-754 compliant processors. If you change the type of your variables from int to double, the last three lines would be illegal (because the operations of bitwise negation and bit shifting require integral arguments), but the first three would provide some way for you to experiment with. Besides, math.h's functions/macros signbit() and copybit() takes zero's signs into account. – Paulo1205 Dec 8 '15 at 8:19
  • "negative zero" is a technical term that, in one's complement, refers to the all-1's bit pattern. Not the expression -0 (which gives positive zero) – M.M Dec 8 '15 at 9:43
3

Based on my interpretation of the standard:

The C++ standard in §3.9.1/p3 Fundamental types [basic.fundamental] actually throws the ball in the C standard:

The signed and unsigned integer types shall satisfy the constraints given in the C standard, section 5.2.4.2.1.

Now if we go to ISO/IEC 9899:2011 section 5.2.4.2.1 it gives as a forward reference to §6.2.6.2/p2 Integer types (Emphasis Mine):

If the sign bit is zero, it shall not affect the resulting value. If the sign bit is one, the value shall be modified in one of the following ways:

  • the corresponding value with sign bit 0 is negated (sign and magnitude);

  • the sign bit has the value −(2^M) (two’s complement);

  • the sign bit has the value −(2^M − 1) (ones’ complement).

Which of these applies is implementation-defined, as is whether the value with sign bit 1 and all value bits zero (for the first two), or with sign bit and all value bits 1 (for ones’ complement), is a trap representation or a normal value. In the case of sign and magnitude and ones’ complement, if this representation is a normal value it is called a negative zero.

Consequently, the existence of negative zero is implementation defined.

If we proceed further in paragraph 3:

If the implementation supports negative zeros, they shall be generated only by:

  • the &, |, ^, ~, <<, and >> operators with operands that produce such a value;

  • the +, -, *, /, and % operators where one operand is a negative zero and the result is zero;

  • compound assignment operators based on the above cases.

It is unspecified whether these cases actually generate a negative zero or a normal zero, and whether a negative zero becomes a normal zero when stored in an object.

Consequently, it is unspecified whether the related cases that you displayed are going to generate a negative zero at all.

Now proceeding in paragraph 4:

If the implementation does not support negative zeros, the behavior of the &, |, ^, ~, <<, and >> operators with operands that would produce such a value is undefined.

Consequently, whether the related operations result in undefined behaviour, depends on whether the implementation supports negative zeros.

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  • No, it's very well defined. It should not produce negative zero in the example. – skyking Dec 8 '15 at 8:20
  • In the expression -0, no operand is a negative zero, and it doesn't use any of the bit-operators. Therefore, shouldn't negzero contain NO negative zero? – dyp Dec 8 '15 at 8:48
  • So the OP made a mistake at how to get a negative zero. That doesn't render the rest of his question void. – DevSolar Dec 8 '15 at 8:50
  • @dyp No. It's the unary minus applied to 0, and 0 is probably not negative zero (and if it were it would be surprising and also surprising that minus negative zero becomes negative zero again). – skyking Dec 8 '15 at 8:51
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    I'm not convinced that the forward reference in the C standard means that the C++ standard incorporated the portion of the C standard so referenced. – T.C. Dec 8 '15 at 8:55
3

First of all, your first premise is wrong:

int negzero = -0;

should produce a normal zero on any conformant architecture.

References for that were given in @101010's answer:

3.9.1 Fundamental types [basic.fundamental] §3:

... The signed and unsigned integer types shall satisfy the constraints given in the C standard, section 5.2.4.2.1.

Later in C reference: 5.2.4.2.1 Sizes of integer types

... Forward references: representations of types (6.2.6)

and (still C): 6.2.6 Representations of types / 6.2.6.2 Integer types § 3

If the implementation supports negative zeros, they shall be generated only by:

  • the &, |, ^, ~, <<, and >> operators with arguments that produce such a value;

  • the +, -, *, /, and % operators where one argument is a negative zero and the result is zero;

  • compound assignment operators based on the above cases.

So negzero = -0 is not such a construct and shall not produce a negative 0.

For following lines, I will assume that the negative 0 was produced in a bitwise manner, on an implementation that supports it.

C++ standard does not speak at all of negative zeros, and C standard just say of them that their existence is implementation dependant. I could not find any paragraph explicitly saying whether a negative zero should or not be equal to a normal zero for relational or equality operator.

So I will just cite in C reference : 6.5.8 Relational operators §6

Each of the operators < (less than), > (greater than), <= (less than or equal to), and >= (greater than or equal to) shall yield 1 if the specified relation is true and 0 if it is false.92) The result has type int.

and in C++ 5.9 Relational operators [expr.rel] §5

If both operands (after conversions) are of arithmetic or enumeration type, each of the operators shall yield true if the specified relationship is true and false if it is false.

My interpretation of standard is that an implementation may allow an alternate representation of the integer value 0 (negative zero) but it is still a representation of the value 0 and it should perform accordingly in any arithmetic expression, because C 6.2.6.2 Integer types § 3 says:

negative zeros[...] shall be generated only by [...] the +, -, *, /, and % operators where one argument is a negative zero and the result is zero

That means that if the result is not 0, a negative 0 should perform as a normal zero.

So these two lines at least are perfectly defined and should produce 1:

std::cout<<(1 << negzero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(1 >> negzero)<<std::endl;

This line is clearly defined to be implementation dependant:

std::cout<<(~negzero)<<(~zero)<<std::endl;

because an implementation could have padding bits. If there are no padding bits, on a one's complement architecture ~zero is negzero, so ~negzero should produce a 0 but I could not find in standard if a negative zero should display as 0 or as -0. A negative floating point 0 should be displayed with a minus sign, but nothing seems explicit for an integer negative value.

For the last 3 line involving relational and equality operators, there is nothing explicit in standard, so I would say it is implementation defined

TL/DR:

Implementation-dependent:

std::cout<<(negzero < zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(negzero <= zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(negzero == zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(~negzero)<<(~zero)<<std::endl;

Perfectly defined and should produce 1:

std::cout<<(1 << negzero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(1 >> negzero)<<std::endl;
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-2

First of all one's complement architectures (or even distinguish negative zero) are rather rare, and there's a reason for that. It's basically easier to (hardware-wise) add two's complement than one's complement.

The code you've posted doesn't seem to have undefined behavior or even implementation defined behavior, it should probably not result in negative zero (or it shouldn't be distinguished from normal zero).

Negative zeros should not be that easy to produce (and if you manage to do that it's implementation defined behavior at best). If it's a ones-complement architecture they would be produced by ~0 (bit-wise inversion) rather than -0.

The C++ standard is rather vague about the actual representation and requirements on the behavior of basic types (which means that the specification only deals with the actual meaning of the number). What this means is that you basically are out of luck in relating internal representation of the number and it's actual value. So even if you did this right and used ~0 (or whatever way is proper for the implementation) the standard still doesn't seem to bother with the representation as the value of negative zero is still zero.

#define zero (0)
#define negzero (~0)
std::cout<<(negzero < zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(negzero <= zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(negzero == zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(~negzero)<<(~zero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(1 << negzero)<<std::endl;
std::cout<<(1 >> negzero)<<std::endl;

the three first lines should produce the same output as if negzero was defined the same as zero. The third line should output two zeros (as the standard requires that 0 to be rendered as 0 without sign-sign). The two last should output ones.

There are some hints (on how to produce negative zeros) that can be found in the C standard which actually mentions negative zero, but I don't think there's any mentions about they should compare less than normal zero. The C-standard suggests that negative zero might not survive storage in object (that's why I avoided that in the above example).

The way C and C++ are related it's reasonable to think that a negative zero would be produced in the same way in C++ as in C, and the standard seem to allow for that. While the C++ standard allows for other ways (via undefined behavior), but no other seem to be available via defined behavior. So it's rather certain that if a C++ implementation is to be able to produce negative zeros in an reasonable way it would be the same as for a similar C implementation.

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  • See stackoverflow.com/a/29974568 (and the rest of the thread) on why C and C++ don't necessarilly agree on all the finer points. Btw, I did not downvote your answer, but would heartily upvote any complete one fully backed by the applicable standards references. – dxiv Dec 8 '15 at 8:26
  • @dxiv I emphasized that reference to C is only hints. Implementations of C/C++ tend to be quite aligned in behavior suggesting that the way to produce negative zeros could be the same. The C++ standard is allowing for such a behavior. In addition there seem to be no other reasonable way to produce negative zeros in the C++ standard. – skyking Dec 8 '15 at 8:32
  • skyking, what is the use of referring to a standard if then you bury it under weasel words? "... tend to be quite aligned in behavior, suggesting that ... could..." – hmijail mourns resignees Mar 22 '16 at 19:05
  • @hmijail Because C++ is not C, there's no requirement of a C++ implementation to derive it's behavior from the C standard even in cases where the C++ standard allows for such a behavior. However when you got an implementation that supports both C and C++ it's often the case that the C++ implementation behaves like the C implementation where the standard allows that. – skyking Mar 23 '16 at 6:19
  • I should clarify my point. I didn't downvote, but fully understand it, because weasel words should be red flags in a question about standards. And you are using them in spades. Again in your last comment: "... it's often the case ...". Things either are in a standard, or aren't; and defining when the standard is ambiguous is useful in itself. But being ambiguous about what might or might not be in the standard is useless, or worse, because you can end up convincing someone (yourself?) about something that is not in the standard. False security is worse than knowing that you are unsafe. – hmijail mourns resignees Mar 23 '16 at 8:29

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