7

I'm looking for what best practice I should use when it comes to testing with Golang using local files.

By using local files, I mean that in order to test functionality, the application needs some local files, as the application reads from these files frequently.

I'm not sure if I should write temporary files myself just before running the tests using the ioutil package tempdir and tempfile functions, or create a test folder like so;

testing/...test_files_here
main.go
main_test.go

and then read from the contents inside

testing/...

Thanks

  • 12
    A folder named testdata is usually used for this purpose as it is ignored by the go tool (see go help packages) – Volker Dec 8 '15 at 12:21
  • Ah yes I see it. "Directory and file names that begin with "." or "_" are ignored by the go tool, as are directories named "testdata" Didn't spot that. Thank you – Miller Dec 8 '15 at 12:27
  • 2
    Admittedly, this is the lazy approach, but I put my testdata right next to the *_test.go files: Easy to access, easy to find and I do not mind to have them around. Another option would be to use //go:generate and go-bindata before creating a dist. – Markus W Mahlberg Dec 8 '15 at 22:20
2

This is my current test setup:

app/
   main.go
   main_test.go
   main_testdata

   package1/
     package1.go 
     package1_test.go 
     package1_testdata1

   package2/
     package2.go 
     package2_test.go 
     package2_testdata1

All the test data that is specific to a single package, is placed within the directory of that package. Common test data that will be used by multiple packages are either placed in the application root or in $HOME.

This set up works for me. Its easy to change the data and test, without having to do extra typing:

vim package1_test_data1; go test app/package1

7

A folder named testdata is usually used for this purpose as it is ignored by the go tool (see go help packages).

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