2

From a text file I load each line into a variable ($line). Each line has a general form, but is not consistent, e.g.

[Foo] - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt £34.99
[BARBAR] ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis £255.25
[BAZZ] - deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. - £500

For each line I want a string which

  • Does not have the square brackets
  • Does not contain leading spaces or non alpha numeric characters e.g. ' - '

To further complicate things I'd like to return the price as a different variable.

A couple of examples of the above data:

$var1 = 'Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt';
$var2 = '£99.99';

$var1 = 'ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis';
$var2 = '£255.25';

$var1 = 'deserunt mollit anim id est laborum';
$var2 = '£500';

I have literally no idea where to begin with what is (to me) a really complicated regex.

Edit, edge cases...

Turns out that way into the text file there's some edge cases my description didn't cover, for example:

[BARBAR] ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis £255.25 (5% off)
[BAZZ] - deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. - £500 (%10 less)

Ideally I'd like to store the value (e.g. '10% less','5% off') in a variable called $discount, if they exist.

  • 1
    Rule 1 of dealing with complex regexes: Don't, use separate ones. – Sobrique Dec 8 '15 at 14:15
  • @Sobrique I understand, thanks – Dr.Avalanche Dec 8 '15 at 14:18
5

I keep seeing examples of people trying to cram far too much into a single regex

I would do it like this

  • Remove bracketed substring followed by any number of non-word characters from the start of the string

  • Remove any number of non-word characters followed by a price, and optional whitespace from the end of the string, capturing the price

  • Assign the capture to $price if one was found

Handling the prefix and the suffix separately makes it much easier to write a clear solution, which looks like this. Unfortunately the mess of brackets and backslashes that describe the prefix can't be improved, unless you want to use \[ [^][]* \] which I don't think is significantly better

use strict;
use warnings 'all';
use feature 'say';

while ( <DATA> ) {
    chomp;
    s/ ^ \[ [^\[\]]* \] \W* //x;

    my $price;
    $price = $1 if s/ \W* (£[\d.]+)? \s* \z //x;

    say $_;
    say $price if $price;
}


__DATA__
[Foo] - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt £34.99
[BARBAR] ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis £255.25
[BAZZ] - deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. - £500

output

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt
£34.99
ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis
£255.25
deserunt mollit anim id est laborum
£500
  • This looks like a very good solution, point taken about cramming too much into a single regex. Thanks – Dr.Avalanche Dec 8 '15 at 14:00
  • 2
    I've seen this trend too. I'm really not sure why - I mean, I suppose a 'power' regex seems pretty potent, but it... does exactly the thing that gives perl a bit of a bad rep. Adds complexity, reduces clarity, but without actually gaining much efficiency for all it's concise. – Sobrique Dec 8 '15 at 14:17
  • @Sobrique, please take a look at my edited question, there's an edge case I've just found. – Dr.Avalanche Dec 8 '15 at 15:02
  • 1
    If the discount is always bracketed like that, it should be trivial to adapt this answer. – Sobrique Dec 8 '15 at 15:07
  • @Sobrique my regex fu is weak, my brain today is weaker, I'm still trying to figure out how the above works, never mind adapt it :) – Dr.Avalanche Dec 8 '15 at 15:11
1
#!/usr/bin/env perl -w

use strict;

while (<>)
{
    chomp;
    if (/^\[[^\]]+\]\W+(.*?)(?:\W+(£\d+(?:\.\d{2})?))?$/)
    {
        print "line: $1\n";
        print "price: $2\n" if $2;
    }
}

Output:

line: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt
price: £34.99
line: ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis
price: £255.25
line: deserunt mollit anim id est laborum
price: £500
  • 2
    You should use warnings 'all' in preference to -w on the command liune or shebang line – Borodin Dec 8 '15 at 13:45
  • You should also use chomp instead of chop, and use style choices that aid other people rather than yourself, which mostly means using perlstyle – Borodin Dec 8 '15 at 15:43
  • @Borodin, changed the chop to chomp, however I don't quite see what style changes you are alluding to. The only thing that I see is the position of the opening curly brackets, but that's really a matter of taste (I just hate trailing brackets), and I doubt that would be a problem for anyone. Anything else? – jcaron Dec 8 '15 at 15:56

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