10

I have a specific problem. I have a table which contains invalid values. I need to replace the invalid values (here 0) with the previous value which is bigger than 0.

The difficulty is, it is not appropiate for me to use an Update or an insert(Cursor and update would do it).Well my only way is to use a Select statement.

When I use the lag(col1, 1) - function with when case, I get only one column with the correct value.

select col1, col2 realcol2,  
(case 
  when col2 = 0 then 
    lag(col2,1,1) over (partition by col1 order by col1 )
  else
   col2
  end ) col2,     
col3 realcol3,
(case 
  when col3 = 0 then 
    lag(col3,1,1) over (partition by col1 order by col1 )
  else
   col3
  end ) col3
from test_table 

Contents of TEST_TABLE:

---------------------------
 Col1 | Col2 | Col3 | Col4
---------------------------
  A   |  0   |  1   |  5
  B   |  0   |  4   |  0
  C   |  2   |  0   |  0
  D   |  0   |  0   |  0
  E   |  3   |  5   |  0
  F   |  0   |  3   |  0
  G   |  0   |  3   |  1
  A   |  0   |  1   |  5
  E   |  3   |  5   |  0

Expected query result:

---------------------------
 Col1 | Col2 | Col3 | Col4
---------------------------
  A   |  0   |  1   |  5
  B   |  0   |  4   |  5
  C   |  2   |  4   |  5
  D   |  2   |  4   |  5
  E   |  3   |  5   |  5
  F   |  3   |  3   |  5
  G   |  3   |  3   |  1
  A   |  3   |  1   |  5
  E   |  3   |  5   |  5
2
  • why is it not appropriate to use a cursor? That would effective and efficient.
    – kevinskio
    Dec 8, 2015 at 16:12
  • 1
    How is ordering defined in your data? I.e. why are there trailing A and E values for Col1?
    – Lukas Eder
    Dec 8, 2015 at 16:14

3 Answers 3

8

I'm assuming an additional column col0 that contains an obvious ordering criteria for your data, as your col1 example data isn't really ordered correctly (repeated, trailing values of A and E).

I love the MODEL clause for these kinds of purposes. The following query yields the expected result:

WITH t(col0, col1, col2, col3, col4) AS (
  SELECT 1, 'A', 0, 1, 5 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 2, 'B', 0, 4, 0 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 3, 'C', 2, 0, 0 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 4, 'D', 0, 0, 0 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 5, 'E', 3, 5, 0 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 6, 'F', 0, 3, 0 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 7, 'G', 0, 3, 1 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 8, 'A', 0, 1, 5 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
  SELECT 9, 'E', 3, 5, 0 FROM DUAL
)
SELECT * FROM t
MODEL
  DIMENSION BY (row_number() OVER (ORDER BY col0) rn)
  MEASURES (col1, col2, col3, col4)
  RULES (
    col2[any] = DECODE(col2[cv(rn)], 0, NVL(col2[cv(rn) - 1], 0), col2[cv(rn)]),
    col3[any] = DECODE(col3[cv(rn)], 0, NVL(col3[cv(rn) - 1], 0), col3[cv(rn)]),
    col4[any] = DECODE(col4[cv(rn)], 0, NVL(col4[cv(rn) - 1], 0), col4[cv(rn)])
  )

Result:

RN   COL1  COL2  COL3  COL4
1    A     0     1     5
2    B     0     4     5
3    C     2     4     5
4    D     2     4     5
5    E     3     5     5
6    F     3     3     5
7    G     3     3     1
8    A     3     1     5
9    E     3     5     5

SQLFiddle

A note on the MODEL clause vs. window function-based approaches

While the above looks cool (or scary, depending on your point of view), you should certainly prefer using a window function based appraoch as exposed by the other elegant answers by nop77svk (using LAST_VALUE() IGNORE NULLS) or MT0 (using LAG() IGNORE NULLS). I've explained these answers more in detail in this blog post.

4
  • 1
    @nop77svk: Yes. It's like a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. As long as you don't produce cycles between cells in your rules, you're fine
    – Lukas Eder
    Dec 8, 2015 at 17:03
  • Heh. Perhaps I should attempt to tackle this problem here with MATCH_RECOGNIZE, too, to make things even wilder? :)
    – Lukas Eder
    Dec 8, 2015 at 17:07
  • You certainly should. :-) Dec 8, 2015 at 17:08
  • @nop77svk: Technically, that's the same thing
    – Lukas Eder
    Dec 8, 2015 at 19:20
5

Assuming you want the previous values as per your original data order (whatever that might be), then your query might look like:

with preserve_the_order$ as (
    select X.*,
        rownum as original_order$
    from test_table X
)
select X.col1,
    nvl(last_value(case when col2 > 0 then col2 end) ignore nulls over (order by original_order$ rows between unbounded preceding and current row), col2) as col2,
    nvl(last_value(case when col3 > 0 then col3 end) ignore nulls over (order by original_order$ rows between unbounded preceding and current row), col3) as col3,
    nvl(last_value(case when col4 > 0 then col4 end) ignore nulls over (order by original_order$ rows between unbounded preceding and current row), col4) as col4
from preserve_the_order$ X
order by original_order$
;

Result:

COL1       COL2       COL3       COL4
---- ---------- ---------- ----------
A             0          1          5
B             0          4          5
C             2          4          5
D             2          4          5
E             3          5          5
F             3          3          5
G             3          3          1
A             0          1          5
E             3          5          5
5
  • 1
    Interesting approach. I'm suspecting the OP wants the rule to be applied to all of COL2, COL3, and COL4. Also, this would produce NULL values for COL2's leading zeros... And you should remove COL1 from the window function's ORDER BY clause
    – Lukas Eder
    Dec 8, 2015 at 16:28
  • Yes, @LukasEder, thank you. Answer updated. And I love your MODEL approach even more, actually. I'm still getting into this powerful clause, don't know how to fully use it yet. :-) Dec 8, 2015 at 16:34
  • 1
    I prefer your approach - keep forgetting about LAST_VALUE. Very cunning combo with the frame clause. Here's some useful insight into MODEL. It's not really that hard, but I have to look up the syntax all the time, myself :)
    – Lukas Eder
    Dec 8, 2015 at 16:35
  • 1
    @LukasEder, done removing the col1. This one is really subject to different interpretations of what OP wants, that's why I've put it there originally. As for the syntax lookup - the same here for all those PIVOTs and UNPIVOTs. :-) Dec 8, 2015 at 16:37
  • Hah, yeah. This COL1 - COL4 table screams UNPIVOT, just because we can, right? ;)
    – Lukas Eder
    Dec 8, 2015 at 16:38
4
SELECT col1,
       CASE col2 WHEN 0 THEN NVL( LAG( CASE col2 WHEN 0 THEN NULL ELSE col2 END ) IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY NULL ), 0 ) ELSE col2 END AS col2,
       CASE col3 WHEN 0 THEN NVL( LAG( CASE col3 WHEN 0 THEN NULL ELSE col3 END ) IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY NULL ), 0 ) ELSE col3 END AS col3,
       CASE col4 WHEN 0 THEN NVL( LAG( CASE col4 WHEN 0 THEN NULL ELSE col4 END ) IGNORE NULLS OVER ( ORDER BY NULL ), 0 ) ELSE col4 END AS col4
FROM   table_name;

Result:

COL1       COL2       COL3       COL4
---- ---------- ---------- ----------
A             0          1          5 
B             0          4          5 
C             2          4          5 
D             2          4          5 
E             3          5          5 
F             3          3          5 
G             3          3          1 
A             3          1          5 
E             3          5          5

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