31

I was studying some programming and I found an exercise to write an algorithm finding "threesome numbers" (numbers that are divisible by exactly 3 numbers). I wrote this:

function threesomeNumber(N) {
    var found = 0;
    var i = 1;
    var numberOfDivisions = 1;
    while (found < N) {
        for (var j = 2; j <= i; j++) {
            if (i % j === 0) {
                numberOfDivisions++;
            }
        }
        if (numberOfDivisions === 3) {
            found++;
            console.log(found + " = " + i);
        }
        numberOfDivisions = 1;
        i++;
    }
}

The problem is it's running kinda slow and I was wondering if it can be done quicker. Does anybody know of a more optimized solution? I want it to find N consecutive threesome numbers.

9
  • 8
    I've been looking for a better solution for finding threesomes for quite a while now. My usual approach has only ever worked once, and in the middle of it I encountered a runtime error.
    – Chev
    Dec 8 '15 at 18:51
  • 17
    @Krzysztof, I suspect this question will gain a lot of votes from its title alone. Hint: in English, threesome does not actually mean numbers that are divisible by exactly 3 numbers. Dec 8 '15 at 18:52
  • 1
    @FrédéricHamidi Yes, but in mathematics it has a different meaning. You made a good point though. Dec 8 '15 at 18:59
  • 2
    I don't think it has this meaning in mathematics outside of this problem - citation please?
    – djechlin
    Dec 9 '15 at 4:47
  • 1
    If you take the definition of threesome as given by the code, there are not even two consecutive threesome numbers. If you don't count 1 as a divisor (done implicitly by numberOfDivisions = 1 and starting j at 2), then, for example 6 is threesome (divisors are 2, 3, and 6) and the first sequence of three consecutive threesome numbers starts at 33. Dec 9 '15 at 6:51
46

The only threesome numbers are squares of primes (divisors 1, p, p^2). Just do Erathostenes and return the squares.

Proof: If it has an odd number of divisors it is known to be a square. Since 1 and n^2 are always divisors of n^2, we may only have one more divisor, i.e. n. Any divisor of n would be another divisor of n^2, therefore n is prime.

Example (based on given code):

function threesomeNumber(N) {
var found = 0;
var i = 2;
var prime = true;
while (found < N) {
    // Naive prime test, highly inefficient
    for (var j = 2; j*j <= i; j++) {
        if (i % j === 0) {
            prime = false;
        }
    }
    if (prime) {
        found++;
        console.log(found + " = " + (i*i));
    }
    prime = true;
    i++;
  }
}
4
  • Why not products of two primes? Dec 9 '15 at 7:12
  • 2
    @PatrickCollins Then it will have four divisors instead of three: 1, two primes, and the product itself.
    – Ken Hung
    Dec 9 '15 at 7:57
  • @KenHung Ah, I wasn't thinking of the product itself. Thanks! Dec 9 '15 at 8:34
  • 1
    The "highly inefficient" comment on the primality test is somewhat of an understatement! But given that you have provided an excellent algorithmic solution and explicitly mentioned using a Sieve, +1 Dec 9 '15 at 9:09
15

You could implement an algorithm based on the sieve of Eratosthenes. The only change is that you don't mark the multiples of found primes, but the multiples of found numbers which have at least 3 divisors. The reason is that you can be sure that the multiples of these numbers have more than 3 divisors.

EDIT: Hermann's solution is the best for "threesomes". My idea is more general and applicable for "N-somes".

4

A more optimized solution is to find the first N Prime numbers and square them. The idea behind that is that prime numbers are divisible by only two numbers. So numbers divisible by only three numbers have an extra divider which must be its square root. It must be a prime so it doesn't add extra divider to the main number dividers.

function threesomeNumber(N){
    return firstPrimes(N).map(function(x){return x*x})
}

Where firstPrimes is a function that returns the first N primes.

1
  • It doesn't :) . I was finishing it when I saw his answer. I couldn't just throw it away.
    – MIE
    Dec 8 '15 at 19:13
2

Here's a simple one:

function threesomeNumber(N)
{
    var found = 0;
    var i = 1;
    var numberOfDivisions = 1;

    while(found < N)
    {
        for(var j = 2; j <= i; j++)
        {
            if(i % j === 0)
                numberOfDivisions++;

            // Stop trying if more that 3 Divisions are Found
            if(numberOfDivisions > 3)
               break;
        }

        if(numberOfDivisions === 3)
        {
            found++;
            console.log(found + " = " + i);
        }

        numberOfDivisions = 1;
        i++;
    }
}
4
  • 1
    This is not a right answer, I was asking for more optimized version and you gave the same solution I did in the first place. See accepted answer. Dec 8 '15 at 19:12
  • 1
    I added a break, which actually sped things up a bit.
    – Boom
    Dec 8 '15 at 19:15
  • 2
    @KrzysztofKraszewski this answer does offer a slight optimization over your original attempt: the conditional break. Dec 8 '15 at 19:16
  • 1
    Yes, but as you said: slight. Dec 8 '15 at 19:25
1

Here is one with time complexity= O(N^(1/2)*N^(1/4))

    public int exactly3Divisors(int N)
    {
        int count=0,flag=0;
        for(int i=2;i*i<=N;i++){
            for(int j=2;j*j<=i;j++){
                if(i%j==0){
                    flag=1;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if(flag==0){
                count++;
            }
            flag=0;
        }
        return count;
    }
0
int threesomeNumber(int N)
{
    //Your code here

    int num =0;
    bool prime = true;

    for(int i=2; i<=sqrt(N); i++)
    {
        for(int j=2; j<i; j++)
        {
            if(i % j == 0)
            {
                prime = false;
                break;
            }
        }

        if(prime)
        {
            num++;
        }
        prime = true;
    }
    return num;  
}
1
  • 1
    While this code may provide a solution to the question, it's better to add context as to why/how it works. This can help future users learn, and apply that knowledge to their own code. You are also likely to have positive feedback from users in the form of upvotes, when the code is explained.
    – borchvm
    May 8 '20 at 8:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.