42

In C, why is signed int faster than unsigned int? True, I know that this has been asked and answered multiple times on this website (links below). However, most people said that there is no difference. I have written code and accidentally found a significant performance difference.

Why would the "unsigned" version of my code be slower than the "signed" version (even when testing the same number)? (I have a x86-64 Intel processor).

Similar links

Compile Command: gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -O3 -Wl,-O3 -g0 -ggdb0 -s -fwhole-program -funroll-loops -pthread -pipe -ffunction-sections -fdata-sections -std=c11 -o ./test ./test.c && strip --strip-all --strip-unneeded --remove-section=.note --remove-section=.comment ./test


signed int version

NOTE: There is no difference if I explicitly declare signed int on all numbers.

int isprime(int num) {
    // Test if a signed int is prime
    int i;
    if (num % 2 == 0 || num % 3 == 0)
        return 0;
    else if (num % 5 == 0 || num % 7 == 0)
        return 0;
    else {
        for (i = 11; i < num; i += 2) {
            if (num % i == 0) {
                if (i != num)
                    return 0;
                else
                    return 1;
            }
        }
    }
    return 1;
}

unsigned int version

int isunsignedprime(unsigned int num) {
    // Test if an unsigned int is prime
    unsigned int i;
    if (num % (unsigned int)2 == (unsigned int)0 || num % (unsigned int)3 == (unsigned int)0)
        return 0;
    else if (num % (unsigned int)5 == (unsigned int)0 || num % (unsigned int)7 == (unsigned int)0)
        return 0;
    else {
        for (i = (unsigned int)11; i < num; i += (unsigned int)2) {
            if (num % i == (unsigned int)0) {
                if (i != num)
                    return 0;
                else
                    return 1;
            }
        }
    }
    return 1;
}

Test this in a file with the below code:

int main(void) {
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294967291));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294367293));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294967293));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294967241)); // slow
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294967251));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294965291));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294966291));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294963293));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294927293));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294961293));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294917293));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294167293));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294267293));
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294367293)); // slow
    printf("%d\n", isprime(294467293));
    return 0;
}

Results (time ./test):

Signed - real 0m0.949s
Unsigned - real 0m1.174s
25
  • 4
    It may just be due to the overhead of all of the explicit casting.
    – Cᴏʀʏ
    Dec 8, 2015 at 20:13
  • 14
    The first thing I'd do is compare the generated assembly code for both cases, and see if any additional instructions are being emitted in the unsigned case.
    – Tom Karzes
    Dec 8, 2015 at 20:19
  • 16
    When writing benchmarks I strongly suggest to increase the measurement time to at least 30s and to run the task executing the benchmark with highest priority possible. Otherwise your measured 20% difference may be cause by a great deal by the OS. Dec 8, 2015 at 20:22
  • 10
    @Cᴏʀʏ they're free casts anyway. They tell the compiler to change the type, but cost no code to implement.
    – user555045
    Dec 8, 2015 at 20:25
  • 7
    (unsigned int)3 can be more clearly written 3u
    – M.M
    Dec 8, 2015 at 21:03

6 Answers 6

39

Your question is genuinely intriguing as the unsigned version consistently produces code that is 10 to 20% slower. Yet there are multiple problems in the code:

  • Both functions return 0 for 2, 3, 5 and 7, which is incorrect.
  • The test if (i != num) return 0; else return 1; is completely useless as the loop body is only run for i < num. Such a test would be useful for the small prime tests but special casing them is not really useful.
  • the casts in the unsigned version are redundant.
  • benchmarking code that produces textual output to the terminal is unreliable, you should use the clock() function to time CPU intensive functions without any intervening I/O.
  • the algorithm for prime testing is utterly inefficient as the loop runs num / 2 times instead of sqrt(num).

Let's simplify the code and run some precise benchmarks:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int isprime_slow(int num) {
    if (num % 2 == 0)
        return num == 2;
    for (int i = 3; i < num; i += 2) {
        if (num % i == 0)
            return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

int unsigned_isprime_slow(unsigned int num) {
    if (num % 2 == 0)
        return num == 2;
    for (unsigned int i = 3; i < num; i += 2) {
        if (num % i == 0)
            return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

int isprime_fast(int num) {
    if (num % 2 == 0)
        return num == 2;
    for (int i = 3; i * i <= num; i += 2) {
        if (num % i == 0)
            return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

int unsigned_isprime_fast(unsigned int num) {
    if (num % 2 == 0)
        return num == 2;
    for (unsigned int i = 3; i * i <= num; i += 2) {
        if (num % i == 0)
            return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

int main(void) {
    int a[] = {
        294967291, 0, 294367293, 0, 294967293, 0, 294967241, 1, 294967251, 0,
        294965291, 0, 294966291, 0, 294963293, 0, 294927293, 1, 294961293, 0,
        294917293, 0, 294167293, 0, 294267293, 0, 294367293, 0, 294467293, 0,
    };
    struct testcase { int (*fun)(); const char *name; int t; } test[] = {
        { isprime_slow, "isprime_slow", 0 },
        { unsigned_isprime_slow, "unsigned_isprime_slow", 0 },
        { isprime_fast, "isprime_fast", 0 },
        { unsigned_isprime_fast, "unsigned_isprime_fast", 0 },
    };

    for (int n = 0; n < 4; n++) {
        clock_t t = clock();
        for (int i = 0; i < 30; i += 2) {
            if (test[n].fun(a[i]) != a[i + 1]) {
                printf("%s(%d) != %d\n", test[n].name, a[i], a[i + 1]);
            }
        }
        test[n].t = clock() - t;
    }
    // Using CLOCKS_PER_SEC to convert CPU time to milliseconds:
    // on Windows CLOCKS_PER_SEC is 1000,
    // on Linux and macOS, CLOCKS_PER_SEC is usually 1000000,
    // printf("CLOCKS_PER_SEC: %ld\n", (long)CLOCKS_PER_SEC);
    for (int n = 0; n < 4; n++) {
        double ms = test[n].t * 1000.0 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
        printf("%21s: %.3fms\n", test[n].name, ms);
    }
    return 0;
}

The code compiled with clang -O2 on OS/X produces this output:

         isprime_slow:  788.004ms
unsigned_isprime_slow:  965.381ms
         isprime_fast:    0.065ms
unsigned_isprime_fast:    0.089ms

These timings are consistent with the OP's observed behavior on a different system, but show the dramatic improvement caused by the more efficient iteration test: 10000 times faster!

Regarding the question Why is the function slower with unsigned?, let's look at the generated code (gcc 7.2 -O2):

isprime_slow(int):
        ...
.L5:
        movl    %edi, %eax
        cltd
        idivl   %ecx
        testl   %edx, %edx
        je      .L1
.L4:
        addl    $2, %ecx
        cmpl    %esi, %ecx
        jne     .L5
.L6:
        movl    $1, %edx
.L1:
        movl    %edx, %eax
        ret

unsigned_isprime_slow(unsigned int):
        ...
.L19:
        xorl    %edx, %edx
        movl    %edi, %eax
        divl    %ecx
        testl   %edx, %edx
        je      .L22
.L18:
        addl    $2, %ecx
        cmpl    %esi, %ecx
        jne     .L19
.L20:
        movl    $1, %eax
        ret
       ...
.L22:
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        ret

The inner loops are very similar, same number of instructions, similar instructions. Here are however some potential explanations:

  • cltd extends the sign of the eax register into the edx register, which may be causing an instruction delay because eax is modified by the immediately preceeding instruction movl %edi, %eax. Yet this would make the signed version slower than the unsigned one, not faster.
  • the loops' initial instructions might be misaligned for the unsigned version, but it is unlikely as changing the order in the source code has no effect on the timings.
  • Although the register contents are identical for the signed and unsigned division opcodes, it is possible that the idivl instruction take fewer cycles than the divl instruction. Indeed the signed division operates on one less bit of precision than the unsigned division, but the difference seems quite large for this small change.
  • I suspect more effort was put into the silicon implementation of idivl because signed divisions are more common that unsigned divisions (as measured by years of coding statistics at Intel).
  • as commented by rcgldr, looking at instruction tables for Intel process, for Ivy Bridge, DIV 32 bit takes 10 micro ops, 19 to 27 cycles, IDIV 9 micro ops, 19 to 26 cycles. The benchmark times are consistent with these timings. The extra micro-op may be due to the longer operands in DIV (64/32 bits) as opposed to IDIV (63/31 bits).

This surprising result should teach us a few lessons:

  • optimizing is a difficult art, be humble and procrastinate.
  • correctness is often broken by optimizations.
  • choosing a better algorithm beats optimization by a long shot.
  • always benchmark code, do not trust your instincts.
6
  • Why not precompute sqrt(m) rounded down (float cast to unsigned int, say, once and use that as the upper limit in the iteration? That's faster than testing i * i <= m Aug 31, 2017 at 22:16
  • 4
    @HennoBrandsma: it may be faster or not faster, only benchmarking can tell... Multiplication is quite fast on modern CPUs. There is also a precision issue for large values of num. Last and not least, I was trying to have very simple functions so the assembly code would stay simple too.
    – chqrlie
    Aug 31, 2017 at 22:22
  • This answer seems to have the most actual information, but it still doesn't clear things up for me. Aug 31, 2017 at 22:36
  • @MichaelBurr: I suspect more effort was put into the silicon implementation of idivl because signed divisions are more common that unsigned divisions (as measured by years of coding statistics at Intel), but I have no proof.
    – chqrlie
    Aug 31, 2017 at 22:42
  • 2
    Looking at instruction tables for Intel process, for Ivy Bridge, DIV 32 bit takes 10 micro ops, 19 to 27 cycles, IDIV 9 micro ops, 19 to 26 cycles. On WIndows XP (my only 32 bit OS), Intel 3770K 3.5 ghz, Visual Studio, the fast times are 0.048 ms for int, 0.065 ms for unsigned int.
    – rcgldr
    Aug 31, 2017 at 23:12
16

Because signed integer overflow is undefined, the compiler can make a lot of assumptions and optimizations on code involving signed integers. Unsigned integer overflow is defined to wrap around, so the compiler won't be able to optimize as much. See also http://blog.llvm.org/2011/05/what-every-c-programmer-should-know.html#signed_overflow and http://www.airs.com/blog/archives/120.

2
  • 4
    Your statements are correct, but looking at the code generated by x86 compilers, it does not seem to be a pertinent explanation.
    – chqrlie
    Aug 31, 2017 at 22:48
  • Your statements looks right but it seems to be answering the reverse question. So wrong at last.
    – iBug
    Sep 1, 2017 at 0:31
3

From Instruction specification on AMD/Intel we have (for K7):

Instruction Ops Latency Throughput
DIV r32/m32 32  24      23
IDIV r32    81  41      41
IDIV m32    89  41      41 

For i7, latency and throughput are the same for IDIVL and DIVL, a slight difference exists for the µops.

This may explain the difference as -O3 assembly codes only differ by signedness (DIVL vs IDIVL) on my machine.

4
  • 9
    Hold on, that's the wrong way around: this would make unsigned faster
    – user555045
    Dec 8, 2015 at 20:59
  • But this table says it should be faster for 32bit unsigned, which it wasn't (but of course OP probably doesn't have a K7 anymore)
    – user555045
    Dec 8, 2015 at 21:20
  • 2
    These may be worst case latency, for something like negative operands. Does your measured performance change when operands are negative?
    – Michael
    Dec 8, 2015 at 22:14
  • the unsigned version uses div which will have to be faster
    – phuclv
    Nov 26, 2016 at 17:19
0

I took the liberty to run the code provided by chqrlie on my Intel Coffee Lake i7-i8700k CPU.

in C: Results running on Windows (clock_t measures in ms),
Compiled with Clang with Visual Studio Code:
         isprime_slow: 652.000ms
unsigned_isprime_slow: 645.000ms
         isprime_fast: 0.000ms
unsigned_isprime_fast: 0.000ms

in C: Results running on Windows (clock_t measures in ms),
Compiled with Intel API with Visual Studio:
         isprime_slow: 534.000ms
unsigned_isprime_slow: 536.000ms
         isprime_fast: 0.000ms
unsigned_isprime_fast: 0.000ms

Result: unsigned is comparable fast.

in C: Results running on WSL (Ubuntu) under Windows,
Compiled with Clang with Visual Studio Code:
         isprime_slow: 538.425ms
unsigned_isprime_slow: 600.475ms
         isprime_fast: 0.041ms
unsigned_isprime_fast: 0.037ms

Result: unsigned is slower on Linux with Clang. This seems to be an issue with the Clang compiler as the signed code has comparable speed to windows compiler. Interestingly, the fast solution is even faster then the signed version, even with Clang.

To check, if the compiler is the issue, I have rewritten the Code in Rust. In Rust: Results running on Windows, rewritten in Rust: isprime_slow: 530.434ms unsigned_isprime_slow: 530.490ms isprime_fast: 0.045ms unsigned_isprime_fast: 0.038ms

In Rust: Results running on WSL, rewritten in Rust:
         isprime_slow: 523.833ms
unsigned_isprime_slow: 519.132ms
         isprime_fast: 0.040ms
unsigned_isprime_fast: 0.040ms

Now using a different compiler with an equally fast language the results match the Intel Compiler.

As such: The speed for unsigned and signed only has to do on how it was compiled.

Rust Code

use std::time::Instant;

struct Testcase {
    f: &'static dyn Fn(i32) -> bool,
    name: &'static str,
    duration_ms: f64,
}

impl Testcase {
    pub fn do_test(&self, number: i32) -> bool {
        (self.f)(number)
    }
}

fn is_prime_signed_slow_i32(number: i32) -> bool {
    let num = number;
    if num % 2 == 0 {
        return num == 2; // returns true for 2 which is a prime, else false
    }
    for i in (3..num).step_by(2) {
        if num % i == 0 {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

fn is_prime_signed_fast_while_i32(number: i32) -> bool {
    let num = number;
    if num % 2 == 0 {
        return num == 2;
    }
    let mut i: i32 = 3;
    while i * i <= num {
        if num % i == 0 {
            return false;
        }
        i += 2;
    }
    return true;
}

fn is_prime_unsigned_slow_u32(number: i32) -> bool {
    //println!("slow");
    let num = number as u32;
    if num % 2 == 0 {
        return num == 2;
    }
    for i in (3..num).step_by(2) {
        if num % i == 0 {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

fn is_prime_unsigned_fast_while_u32(number: i32) -> bool {
    // println!("while");
    let num = number as u32;
    if num % 2 == 0 {
        return num == 2;
    }
    let mut i: u32 = 3;
    while i * i <= num {
        if num % i == 0 {
            return false;
        }
        i += 2;
    }
    return true;
}

fn main() {
    println!("Testing Prime Number Check\n");

    let mut testcases = [
        Testcase {
            f: &is_prime_signed_slow_i32,
            name: "isprime_slow",
            duration_ms: 0.0,
        },
        Testcase {
            f: &is_prime_unsigned_slow_u32,
            name: "unsigned_isprime_slow",
            duration_ms: 0.0,
        },
        Testcase {
            f: &is_prime_signed_fast_while_i32,
            name: "isprime_fast",
            duration_ms: 0.0,
        },
        Testcase {
            f: &is_prime_unsigned_fast_while_u32,
            name: "unsigned_isprime_fast",
            duration_ms: 0.0,
        },
    ];

    let primes: [i32; 30] = [
        294967291, 0, 294367293, 0, 294967293, 0, 294967241, 1, 294967251, 0, 294965291, 0,
        294966291, 0, 294963293, 0, 294927293, 1, 294961293, 0, 294917293, 0, 294167293, 0,
        294267293, 0, 294367293, 0, 294467293, 0,
    ];

    // get max len testcase for formatting
    let mut max_len = 0;
    for t in &testcases {
        let len = t.name.len();
        if len > max_len {
            max_len = len;
        }
    }

    // run testcases
    for testcase in testcases.iter_mut() {
        let start = Instant::now();
        for i in (0..primes.len()).step_by(2) {
            let is_prime = testcase.do_test(primes[i]);
            if is_prime as i32 != primes[i + 1] {
                println!("Error in {} for prime id {i}: {}", testcase.name, primes[i]);
            }
        }
        testcase.duration_ms = start.elapsed().as_micros() as f64 / 1000.0;
        println!("{:>max_len$} = {:.3}ms", testcase.name, testcase.duration_ms);
    }

}
2
  • This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. - From Review
    – possum
    Jan 17 at 11:56
  • To the people deleting this answer. Please explain your reasoning. The original question asks why the code for unsigned is slower. This answers it. It is the compiler. Jan 19 at 17:04
-1

Alternative wiki candidate test that may/may not show a significant time difference.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

#define J 10
#define I 5

int main(void) {
  clock_t c1,c2,c3;
  for (int j=0; j<J; j++) {
    c1 = clock();
    for (int i=0; i<I; i++) {
      isprime(294967241);
      isprime(294367293);
    }
    c2 = clock();
    for (int i=0; i<I; i++) {
      isunsignedprime(294967241);
      isunsignedprime(294367293);
    }
    c3 = clock();
    printf("%d %d %d\n", (int)(c2-c1), (int)(c3-c2), (int)((c3-c2) - (c2-c1)));
    fflush(stdout);
  }
  return 0;
}

Sample output

2761 2746 -15
2777 2777 0
2761 2745 -16
2793 2808 15
2792 2730 -62
2746 2730 -16
2746 2730 -16
2776 2793 17
2823 2808 -15
2793 2823 30
1
  • Thank you for contributing to the Stack Overflow community. This may be a correct answer, but it’d be really useful to provide additional explanation of your code so developers can understand your reasoning. This is especially useful for new developers who aren’t as familiar with the syntax or struggling to understand the concepts. Would you kindly edit your answer to include additional details for the benefit of the community? Jan 15 at 0:24
-1

In fact in many cases unsigned is faster than signed for eample

  • In dividing by a power of 2
    unsigned int x=37;
    cout<<x/4;
  • In checking if a number if even
    unsigned int x=37;
    cout<<(x%2==0)?"even":"odd";
3
  • 1
    "in many cases unsigned is faster than signed" do you have evidence for this claim? Your examples only show how to use unsigned ints, but your answer does not show anything to do with performance and thus does not really answer the question. Sep 22, 2022 at 9:57
  • 1
    As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Sep 22, 2022 at 9:58
  • @ThomasFlinkow For bechmarking check this answer Sep 24, 2022 at 10:29

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